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Page 080

CHITTERLOW

it I wouldn't like your opinion on these first two acts of thot tragedy I'm on to. I haven't told you about that. It wouldn't take me more than an hour to read.' ....

§ 3
Then, so far as he could subsequently remember, Kipps had `another,' and then it would seem that, suddenly regardless of the tragedy, he insisted that he `really must be getting on,' and from that point his memory became irregular. Certain things remained quite clearly, and as it is a matter of common knowledge that intoxicated people forget what happens to them, it follows that he was not intoxicated. Chitterlow came with him, partly to see him home and partly for a freshener before turning in. Kipps recalled afterwards very distinctly how in Little Fenchurch Street he discovered that he could not walk straight, and also that Chitterlow's needle and thread in his still unmended trouser leg was making an annoying little noise on the pavement behind him. He tried to pick up the needle suddenly by surprise, and somehow tripped and fell, and then Chitterlow, laughing uproariously, helped him up. `It wasn't a bicycle this time, old boy,' said Chitterlow, and that appeared to them both at the time as being a quite extraordinarily good joke indeed. They punched each other about on the strength of it.
For a time after that Kipps certainly pretended to be quite desperately drunk and unable to walk, and Chitterlow entered into the pretence and supported him. After that Kipps remembered being struck with the extremely laughable absurdity of going downhill to Tontine Street in order to go uphill again to the Emporium, and trying to get that idea into Chitterlow's head and being unable to do so on account of his own merriment and Chitterlow s evident intoxication; and his next memory after that was of the exterior of the Emporium, shut and darkened, and, as it were, frowning at him with all its stripes of yellow and green. The chilly way in which 'SHALFORD' glitter ed in the moonlight printed itself with particular vividness
on his mind. It appeared to Kipps that that establishment was closed to him for evermore. Those gilded letters, in spite of appearances, spelt FINIS for him and exile from Folkestone. He would never do wood-carving, never see

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE it I wouldn't like your opinion on these first two acts of thot tragedy I'm on to. I haven't told you about that. It wouldn't take me more than an hour to read.' .... § 3 Then, so far as he could subsequently remember, Kipps had `another,' and then it would seem that, suddenly regardless of what is tragedy, he insisted that he `really must be getting on,' and from that point his memory became irregular. Certain things remained quite clearly, and as it is a matter of common knowledge that intoxicated people forget what happens to them, it follows that he was not intoxicated. Chitterlow came with him, partly to see him home and partly for a freshener before turning in. Kipps recalled afterwards very distinctly how in Little Fenchurch Street he discovered that he could not walk straight, and also that Chitterlow's needle and thread in his still unmended trouser leg was making an annoying little noise on what is pavement behind him. He tried to pick up what is needle suddenly by surprise, and somehow tripped and fell, and then Chitterlow, laughing uproariously, helped him up. `It wasn't a bicycle this time, old boy,' said Chitterlow, and that appeared to them both at what is time as being a quite extraordinarily good joke indeed. They punched each other about on what is strength of it. For a time after that Kipps certainly pretended to be quite desperately drunk and unable to walk, and Chitterlow entered into what is pretence and supported him. After that Kipps remembered being struck with what is extremely laughable absurdity of going downhill to Tontine Street in order to go uphill again to what is Emporium, and trying to get that idea into Chitterlow's head and being unable to do so on account of his own merriment and Chitterlow s evident intoxication; and his next memory after that was of what is exterior of what is Emporium, shut and darkened, and, as it were, frowning at him with all its stripes of yellow and green. what is chilly way in which 'SHALFORD' glitter ed in what is moonlight printed itself with particular vividness on his mind. It appeared to Kipps that that establishment was closed to him for evermore. Those gilded letters, in spite of appearances, spelt FINIS for him and exile from Folkestone. He would never do wood-carving, never see where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 080 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" it I wouldn't like your opinion on these first two acts of thot tragedy I'm on to. I haven't told you about that. It wouldn't take me more than an hour to read.' .... where is strong § 3 Then, so far as he could subsequently remember, Kipps had `another,' and then it would seem that, suddenly regardless of what is tragedy, he insisted that he `really must be getting on,' and from that point his memory became irregular. Certain things remained quite clearly, and as it is a matter of common knowledge that intoxicated people forget what happens to them, it follows that he was not intoxicated. Chitterlow came with him, partly to see him home and partly for a freshener before turning in. Kipps recalled afterwards very distinctly how in Little Fenchurch Street he discovered that he could not walk straight, and also that Chitterlow's needle and thread in his still unmended trouser leg was making an annoying little noise on what is pavement behind him. He tried to pick up the needle suddenly by surprise, and somehow tripped and fell, and then Chitterlow, laughing uproariously, helped him up. `It wasn't a bicycle this time, old boy,' said Chitterlow, and that appeared to them both at what is time as being a quite extraordinarily good joke indeed. They punched each other about on what is strength of it. For a time after that Kipps certainly pretended to be quite desperately drunk and unable to walk, and Chitterlow entered into what is pretence and supported him. After that Kipps remembered being struck with what is extremely laughable absurdity of going downhill to Tontine Street in order to go uphill again to what is Emporium, and trying to get that idea into Chitterlow's head and being unable to do so on account of his own merriment and Chitterlow s evident intoxication; and his next memory after that was of what is exterior of what is Emporium, shut and darkened, and, as it were, frowning at him with all its stripes of yellow and green. what is chilly way in which 'SHALFORD' glitter ed in what is moonlight printed itself with particular vividness on his mind. It appeared to Kipps that that establishment was closed to him for evermore. Those gilded letters, in spite of appearances, spelt FINIS for him and exile from Folkestone. He would never do wood-carving, never see where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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