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Page 079

CHITTERLOW

and then he began to sketch out the farcical comedy, and that led him to a digression about another farcical comedy of which he had written a ripping opening scene which wouldn't take ten minutes to read. It had something in it that had never been done on the stage before, and was yet perfectly legitimate, namely, a man with a live beetle down the back of his neck trying to seem at his ease in a roomful of people ....
`They won't lock you out,' he said, in a singularly reassuring tone, and began to read and act what he explained to be (not because he had written it, but simply because he knew it was so on account of his exceptional experience of the stage), and what Kipps also quite clearly saw to be, one of the best opening scenes that had ever been written.
When it was over, Kipps, who rarely swore, was inspired to say the scene was `damned fine' about six times over, whereupon, as if by way of recognition, Chitterlow took a simply enormous portion of the inspired antediluvian, declaring at the same time that he had rarely met a `finer' intelligence than Kipps' (stronger there might be, that he couldn't say with certainty as yet, seeing how little, after all, they had seen of each other, but a finer never), that it was a shame such a gallant and discriminating intelligence should be nightly either locked up or locked out at ten-well, ten-thirty, then-and that he had half a mind to recommend old somebody or other (apparently the editor of a London daily paper) to put on Kipps forthwith as a dramatic critic in the place of the current incapable.
`I don't think I've ever made up anything for print,' said Kipps, `ever. I'd have a thundering good try, though, if ever I got a chance. I would that! I've written window tickets orfen enough. Made 'em up and everything. But that's different.'
`You'd come to it all the fresher for not having done it before. And the way you picked up every point in that scene, my boy, was a Fair Treat! I tell you, you'd knock William Archer into fits. Not so literary, of course, you'd be, but I don't believe in literary critics any more than In literary playwrights. Plays aren't literature-that's just the point they miss. Plays are plays. No ! That won't hamper you, anyhow. You're wasted down here, I tell You. Just as I was, before I took to acting. I'm hanged

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and then he began to sketch out what is farcical comedy, and that led him to a digression about another farcical comedy of which he had written a ripping opening scene which wouldn't take ten minutes to read. It had something in it that had never been done on what is stage before, and was yet perfectly legitimate, namely, a man with a live beetle down what is back of his neck trying to seem at his ease in a roomful of people .... `They won't lock you out,' he said, in a singularly reassuring tone, and began to read and act what he explained to be (not because he had written it, but simply because he knew it was so on account of his exceptional experience of what is stage), and what Kipps also quite clearly saw to be, one of what is best opening scenes that had ever been written. When it was over, Kipps, who rarely swore, was inspired to say what is scene was `damned fine' about six times over, whereupon, as if by way of recognition, Chitterlow took a simply enormous portion of what is inspired antediluvian, declaring at what is same time that he had rarely met a `finer' intelligence than Kipps' (stronger there might be, that he couldn't say with certainty as yet, seeing how little, after all, they had seen of each other, but a finer never), that it was a shame such a gallant and discriminating intelligence should be nightly either locked up or locked out at ten-well, ten-thirty, then-and that he had half a mind to recommend old somebody or other (apparently what is editor of a London daily paper) to put on Kipps forthwith as a dramatic critic in what is place of what is current incapable. `I don't think I've ever made up anything for print,' said Kipps, `ever. I'd have a thundering good try, though, if ever I got a chance. I would that! I've written window tickets orfen enough. Made 'em up and everything. But that's different.' `You'd come to it all what is fresher for not having done it before. And what is way you picked up every point in that scene, my boy, was a Fair Treat! I tell you, you'd knock William Archer into fits. Not so literary, of course, you'd be, but I don't believe in literary critics any more than In literary playwrights. Plays aren't literature-that's just what is point they miss. Plays are plays. No ! That won't hamper you, anyhow. You're wasted down here, I tell You. Just as I was, before I took to acting. I'm hanged where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 079 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" and then he began to sketch out what is farcical comedy, and that led him to a digression about another farcical comedy of which he had written a ripping opening scene which wouldn't take ten minutes to read. It had something in it that had never been done on what is stage before, and was yet perfectly legitimate, namely, a man with a live beetle down what is back of his neck trying to seem at his ease in a roomful of people .... `They won't lock you out,' he said, in a singularly reassuring tone, and began to read and act what he explained to be (not because he had written it, but simply because he knew it was so on account of his exceptional experience of what is stage), and what Kipps also quite clearly saw to be, one of what is best opening scenes that had ever been written. When it was over, Kipps, who rarely swore, was inspired to say what is scene was `damned fine' about six times over, whereupon, as if by way of recognition, Chitterlow took a simply enormous portion of what is inspired antediluvian, declaring at what is same time that he had rarely met a `finer' intelligence than Kipps' (stronger there might be, that he couldn't say with certainty as yet, seeing how little, after all, they had seen of each other, but a finer never), that it was a shame such a gallant and discriminating intelligence should be nightly either locked up or locked out at ten-well, ten-thirty, then-and that he had half a mind to recommend old somebody or other (apparently what is editor of a London daily paper) to put on Kipps forthwith as a dramatic critic in what is place of what is current incapable. `I don't think I've ever made up anything for print,' said Kipps, `ever. I'd have a thundering good try, though, if ever I got a chance. I would that! I've written window tickets orfen enough. Made 'em up and everything. But that's different.' `You'd come to it all what is fresher for not having done it before. And what is way you picked up every point in that scene, my boy, was a Fair Treat! I tell you, you'd knock William Archer into fits. Not so literary, of course, you'd be, but I don't believe in literary critics any more than In literary playwrights. Plays aren't literature-that's just what is point they miss. Plays are plays. No ! That won't hamper you, anyhow. You're wasted down here, I tell You. Just as I was, before I took to acting. I'm hanged where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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