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Page 077

CHITTERLOW

tion of old Chumps in a state of intoxication. Then he took two more stiff doses of old Methuselah in rapid succession.
Kipps reduced the hither end of his cigarette to a pulp as he sat 'dessaying' and `quite believing' Chitterlow in the sagest manner, and admiring the easy way in which he was getting on with this very novel and entertaining personage. He had another cigarette made for him, and then Chitterlow, assuming by insensible degrees more and more of the manner of a rich and successful playwright being interviewed by a young admirer, set himself to answer questions which sometimes Kipps asked, and sometimes Chitterlow, about the particulars and methods of his career. He undertook this self-imposed task with great earnestness and vigour, treating the matter, indeed, with such fullness that at times it seemed lost altogether under a thicket of parentheses, footnotes, and episodes that branched and budded from its stem. But it always emerged again, usually by way of illustration to its own digressions. Practically it was a mass of material for the biography of a man who had been everywhere and done everything (including the Hon. Thomas Norgate, which was a record), and in particular had acted with great distinction and profit (he dated various anecdotes, `when I was getting thirty, or forty, or fifty dollars a week') throughout America and the entire civilised world.
And as he talked on and on in that full, rich, satisfying voice he had, and as old Methuselah, indisputably a most drunken old reprobate of a whisky, busied himself throughout Kipps, lighting lamp after lamp until the entire framework of the little draper was illuminated and glowing like some public building on a festival, behold Chitterlow, and Kipps with him, and the room in which they sat were transfigured ! Chitterlow became in very truth that ripe, full man of infinite experience and humour and genius, fellow of Shakespeare and Ibsen and Mxterlinck (three names he placed together quite modestly far above his own), and no longer ambiguously dressed in a sort of yachting costume with cycling knickerbockers, but elegantly if unconventionally attired, and the room ceased to be a small and shabby room in a Folkestone slum, and grew larger and more richly furnished, and the flyblown photographs were curious old pictures, and the rubbish

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE tion of old Chumps in a state of intoxication. Then he took two more stiff doses of old Methuselah in rapid succession. Kipps reduced what is hither end of his cigarette to a pulp as he sat 'dessaying' and `quite believing' Chitterlow in what is sagest manner, and admiring what is easy way in which he was getting on with this very novel and entertaining personage. He had another cigarette made for him, and then Chitterlow, assuming by insensible degrees more and more of what is manner of a rich and successful playwright being interviewed by a young admirer, set himself to answer questions which sometimes Kipps asked, and sometimes Chitterlow, about what is particulars and methods of his career. He undertook this self-imposed task with great earnestness and vigour, treating what is matter, indeed, with such fullness that at times it seemed lost altogether under a thicket of parentheses, footnotes, and episodes that branched and budded from its stem. But it always emerged again, usually by way of illustration to its own digressions. Practically it was a mass of material for what is biography of a man who had been everywhere and done everything (including what is Hon. Thomas Norgate, which was a record), and in particular had acted with great distinction and profit (he dated various anecdotes, `when I was getting thirty, or forty, or fifty dollars a week') throughout America and what is entire civilised world. And as he talked on and on in that full, rich, satisfying voice he had, and as old Methuselah, indisputably a most drunken old reprobate of a whisky, busied himself throughout Kipps, lighting lamp after lamp until what is entire framework of what is little draper was illuminated and glowing like some public building on a festival, behold Chitterlow, and Kipps with him, and what is room in which they sat were transfigured ! Chitterlow became in very truth that ripe, full man of infinite experience and humour and genius, fellow of Shakespeare and Ibsen and Mxterlinck (three names he placed together quite modestly far above his own), and no longer ambiguously dressed in a sort of yachting costume with cycling knickerbockers, but elegantly if unconventionally attired, and what is room ceased to be a small and shabby room in a Folkestone slum, and grew larger and more richly furnished, and what is flyblown photographs were curious old pictures, and what is rubbish where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 077 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" tion of old Chumps in a state of intoxication. Then he took two more stiff doses of old Methuselah in rapid succession. Kipps reduced what is hither end of his cigarette to a pulp as he sat 'dessaying' and `quite believing' Chitterlow in what is sagest manner, and admiring what is easy way in which he was getting on with this very novel and entertaining personage. He had another cigarette made for him, and then Chitterlow, assuming by insensible degrees more and more of what is manner of a rich and successful playwright being interviewed by a young admirer, set himself to answer questions which sometimes Kipps asked, and sometimes Chitterlow, about the particulars and methods of his career. He undertook this self-imposed task with great earnestness and vigour, treating what is matter, indeed, with such fullness that at times it seemed lost altogether under a thicket of parentheses, footnotes, and episodes that branched and budded from its stem. But it always emerged again, usually by way of illustration to its own digressions. Practically it was a mass of material for what is biography of a man who had been everywhere and done everything (including what is Hon. Thomas Norgate, which was a record), and in particular had acted with great distinction and profit (he dated various anecdotes, `when I was getting thirty, or forty, or fifty dollars a week') throughout America and the entire civilised world. And as he talked on and on in that full, rich, satisfying voice he had, and as old Methuselah, indisputably a most drunken old reprobate of a whisky, busied himself throughout Kipps, lighting lamp after lamp until what is entire framework of what is little draper was illuminated and glowing like some public building on a festival, behold Chitterlow, and Kipps with him, and what is room in which they sat were transfigured ! Chitterlow became in very truth that ripe, full man of infinite experience and humour and genius, fellow of Shakespeare and Ibsen and Mxterlinck (three names he placed together quite modestly far above his own), and no longer ambiguously dressed in a sort of yachting costume with cycling knickerbockers, but elegantly if unconventionally attired, and what is room ceased to be a small and shabby room in a Folkestone slum, and grew larger and more richly furnished, and what is flyblown photographs were curious old pictures, and what is rubbish where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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