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Page 070

CHITTERLOW

He followed a deepening vein of thought.
`Penny, though! It's tuppence,' he said, after a space.
He went down Dover Street in a state of profound melancholia-at the pace and mood, as it were, of his own funeral procession-and he crossed at the corner of Tontine Street, heedless of all mundane things. And there it was that Fortune came upon him, in disguise and with a loud shout, the shout of a person endowed with an unusually rich, full voice, followed immediately by a violent blow in the back.
His hat was over his eyes, and an enormous weight rested on his shoulders, and something kicked him in the back of his calf.
Then he was on all fours in some mud that Fortune, in conjunction with the Folkestone corporation and in the pursuit of equally mysterious ends, had heaped together even lavishly for his reception.
He remained in that position for some seconds, awaiting further developments, and believing almost anything broken before his heart. Gathering at last that this temporary violence of things in general was over, and being perhaps assisted by a clutching hand, he arose, and found himself confronting a figure holding a bicycle and thrusting forward a dark face in anxious scrutiny.
`You aren't hurt, Matey?' gasped the figure.
`Was that yon 'it me?' said Kipps.
`It's these handles, you know,' said the figure with an air of being a fellow-sufferer. `They're too low. And when I go to turn, if I don't remember, Bif!-and I'm in to something.'
'Well-you give me a oner in the back-anyhow,' said Kipps, taking stock of his damages.
`I was coming downhill, you know,' explained the bicyclist. `These little Folkestone hills are a Fair Treat. It isn't as though I'd been on the level. I came rather a whop.'
`You did that,' said Kipps.
`I was back-pedalling for all I was worth, anyhow,' said the bicyclist. `Not that I'm worth much back-pedalling.'
He glanced round and made a sudden movement almost as if to mount his machine. Then he turned as rapidly to Kipps again, who was now stooping down, pursuing the tale of his injuries.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He followed a deepening vein of thought. `Penny, though! It's tuppence,' he said, after a space. He went down Dover Street in a state of profound melancholia-at what is pace and mood, as it were, of his own funeral procession-and he crossed at what is corner of Tontine Street, heedless of all mundane things. And there it was that Fortune came upon him, in disguise and with a loud shout, what is shout of a person endowed with an unusually rich, full voice, followed immediately by a bad blow in what is back. His hat was over his eyes, and an enormous weight rested on his shoulders, and something kicked him in what is back of his calf. Then he was on all fours in some mud that Fortune, in conjunction with what is Folkestone corporation and in what is pursuit of equally mysterious ends, had heaped together even lavishly for his reception. He remained in that position for some seconds, awaiting further developments, and believing almost anything broken before his heart. Gathering at last that this temporary sports of things in general was over, and being perhaps assisted by a clutching hand, he arose, and found himself confronting a figure holding a bicycle and thrusting forward a dark face in anxious scrutiny. `You aren't hurt, Matey?' gasped what is figure. `Was that yon 'it me?' said Kipps. `It's these handles, you know,' said what is figure with an air of being a fellow-sufferer. `They're too low. And when I go to turn, if I don't remember, Bif!-and I'm in to something.' 'Well-you give me a oner in what is back-anyhow,' said Kipps, taking stock of his damages. `I was coming downhill, you know,' explained what is bicyclist. `These little Folkestone hills are a Fair Treat. It isn't as though I'd been on what is level. I came rather a whop.' `You did that,' said Kipps. `I was back-pedalling for all I was worth, anyhow,' said what is bicyclist. `Not that I'm worth much back-pedalling.' He glanced round and made a sudden movement almost as if to mount his machine. Then he turned as rapidly to Kipps again, who was now stooping down, pursuing what is tale of his injuries. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 070 where is p align="center" where is strong CHITTERLOW where is p align="justify" He followed a deepening vein of thought. `Penny, though! It's tuppence,' he said, after a space. He went down Dover Street in a state of profound melancholia-at what is pace and mood, as it were, of his own funeral procession-and he crossed at what is corner of Tontine Street, heedless of all mundane things. And there it was that Fortune came upon him, in disguise and with a loud shout, what is shout of a person endowed with an unusually rich, full voice, followed immediately by a bad blow in the back. His hat was over his eyes, and an enormous weight rested on his shoulders, and something kicked him in what is back of his calf. Then he was on all fours in some mud that Fortune, in conjunction with what is Folkestone corporation and in what is pursuit of equally mysterious ends, had heaped together even lavishly for his reception. He remained in that position for some seconds, awaiting further developments, and believing almost anything broken before his heart. Gathering at last that this temporary sports of things in general was over, and being perhaps assisted by a clutching hand, he arose, and found himself confronting a figure holding a bicycle and thrusting forward a dark face in anxious scrutiny. `You aren't hurt, Matey?' gasped what is figure. `Was that yon 'it me?' said Kipps. `It's these handles, you know,' said what is figure with an air of being a fellow-sufferer. `They're too low. And when I go to turn, if I don't remember, Bif!-and I'm in to something.' 'Well-you give me a oner in what is back-anyhow,' said Kipps, taking stock of his damages. `I was coming downhill, you know,' explained what is bicyclist. `These little Folkestone hills are a Fair Treat. It isn't as though I'd been on what is level. I came rather a whop.' `You did that,' said Kipps. `I was back-pedalling for all I was worth, anyhow,' said what is bicyclist. `Not that I'm worth much back-pedalling.' He glanced round and made a sudden movement almost as if to mount his machine. Then he turned as rapidly to Kipps again, who was now stooping down, pursuing what is tale of his injuries. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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