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Page 065

THE WOODCARVING CLASS

as `simply lovely,' it seemed only right and proper that she should assist Kipps in his modest efforts to place himself in a state of absolute abandon upon her alter.
Under her sympathetic management the position of Kipps was presently defined quite clearly. He was unhappy in his position-misunderstood. He told her he `didn't seem to get on like' with customers, and she translated this for him as `too sensitive.' The discontent with his fate in life, the dreaful feeling that Education was slipping by him, troubles that time and usage were glazing over a little, revived to their old acuteness but not to their old hopelessness. As a basis for sympathy, indeed, they were even a source of pleasure.
And one day at dinner it happened that Carshot and Buggins fell talking of `these here writers,' and how Dickens had been a labeller of blacking, and Thackeray ,an artis' who couldn't sell a drawing,' and how Samuel Johnson had walked to London without any boots, having thrown away his only pair `out of pride.' `It's Luck,' said Buggins, `to a very large extent. They just happen to hit on something that catches on, and there vou are!'
`Nice easy life they have of it, too,' said Miss Mergle. `"'rite just an hour or so, and done for the day! Almost like gentlefolks.'
`There's more work in it than you'd think,' said Carshot, stooping to a mouthful.
`I wouldn't mind changing for all that,' said Buggins. `I'd like to see one of these here authors marking off with Jimmy.'
'I think they copy from each other a good deal,' said Miss Mergle.
`Even then (chup, chup, chup),' said Carshot, `there's writing it out in their own hands.'
They proceeded to enlarge upon the literary life, on its ease and dignity, on the social recognition accorded to those who led it, and on the ample gratifications their vanity achieved. `Pictures everywhere-never get a new suit without being photographed-almost like Royalty,' said Miss Mergle. And all this talk impressed the imagination of Kipps very greatly. Here was a class that seemed to bridge the gulf. On the one hand essentially Low, but by fictitious circumstances capable of entering upon these levels of social superiority to which all true Englishmen

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE as `simply lovely,' it seemed only right and proper that she should assist Kipps in his modest efforts to place himself in a state of absolute abandon upon her alter. Under her sympathetic management what is position of Kipps was presently defined quite clearly. He was unhappy in his position-misunderstood. He told her he `didn't seem to get on like' with customers, and she translated this for him as `too sensitive.' what is discontent with his fate in life, what is dreaful feeling that Education was slipping by him, troubles that time and usage were glazing over a little, revived to their old acuteness but not to their old hopelessness. As a basis for sympathy, indeed, they were even a source of pleasure. And one day at dinner it happened that Carshot and Buggins fell talking of `these here writers,' and how Dickens had been a labeller of blacking, and Thackeray ,an artis' who couldn't sell a drawing,' and how Samuel Johnson had walked to London without any boots, having thrown away his only pair `out of pride.' `It's Luck,' said Buggins, `to a very large extent. They just happen to hit on something that catches on, and there vou are!' `Nice easy life they have of it, too,' said Miss Mergle. `"'rite just an hour or so, and done for what is day! Almost like gentlefolks.' `There's more work in it than you'd think,' said Carshot, stooping to a mouthful. `I wouldn't mind changing for all that,' said Buggins. `I'd like to see one of these here authors marking off with Jimmy.' 'I think they copy from each other a good deal,' said Miss Mergle. `Even then (chup, chup, chup),' said Carshot, `there's writing it out in their own hands.' They proceeded to enlarge upon what is literary life, on its ease and dignity, on what is social recognition accorded to those who led it, and on what is ample gratifications their vanity achieved. `Pictures everywhere-never get a new suit without being photographed-almost like Royalty,' said Miss Mergle. And all this talk impressed what is imagination of Kipps very greatly. Here was a class that seemed to bridge what is gulf. On what is one hand essentially Low, but by fictitious circumstances capable of entering upon these levels of social superiority to which all true Englishmen where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 065 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WOODCARVING CLASS where is p align="justify" as `simply lovely,' it seemed only right and proper that she should assist Kipps in his modest efforts to place himself in a state of absolute abandon upon her alter. Under her sympathetic management what is position of Kipps was presently defined quite clearly. He was unhappy in his position-misunderstood. He told her he `didn't seem to get on like' with customers, and she translated this for him as `too sensitive.' what is discontent with his fate in life, what is dreaful feeling that Education was slipping by him, troubles that time and usage were glazing over a little, revived to their old acuteness but not to their old hopelessness. As a basis for sympathy, indeed, they were even a source of pleasure. And one day at dinner it happened that Carshot and Buggins fell talking of `these here writers,' and how Dickens had been a labeller of blacking, and Thackeray ,an artis' who couldn't sell a drawing,' and how Samuel Johnson had walked to London without any boots, having thrown away his only pair `out of pride.' `It's Luck,' said Buggins, `to a very large extent. They just happen to hit on something that catches on, and there vou are!' `Nice easy life they have of it, too,' said Miss Mergle. `"'rite just an hour or so, and done for what is day! Almost like gentlefolks.' `There's more work in it than you'd think,' said Carshot, stooping to a mouthful. `I wouldn't mind changing for all that,' said Buggins. `I'd like to see one of these here authors marking off with Jimmy.' 'I think they copy from each other a good deal,' said Miss Mergle. `Even then (chup, chup, chup),' said Carshot, `there's writing it out in their own hands.' They proceeded to enlarge upon what is literary life, on its ease and dignity, on what is social recognition accorded to those who led it, and on what is ample gratifications their vanity achieved. `Pictures everywhere-never get a new suit without being photographed-almost like Royalty,' said Miss Mergle. And all this talk impressed the imagination of Kipps very greatly. Here was a class that seemed to bridge what is gulf. On what is one hand essentially Low, but by fictitious circumstances capable of entering upon these levels of social superiority to which all true Englishmen where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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