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Page 058

THE WOODCARVING CLASS

ing resemblances to the young Napoleon, would arrive just at the end of the class-time to see his sister home.
All these personages impressed Kipps with a sense of inferiority that in the case of Miss Walshingham became positively abysmal. The ideas and knowledge they appeared to have, their personal capacity and freedom, opened a new world to his imagination. These people came and went with a sense of absolute assurance, against an overwhelming background of plaster casts, diagrams and tables, benches and a blackboard, a background that seemed to him to be saturated with recondite knowledge and the occult and jealously guarded tips and secrets that constitute Art and the Higher Life. They went home, he imagined, to homes where the piano was played with distinction and freedom, and books littered the tables and foreign languages were habitually used. They had complicated meals, no doubt. They `knew etiquette,' and how to avoid all the errors for which Kipps bought penny manuals-'What to Avoid,"Common Errors in Speaking,' and the like. He knew nothing about it all, nothing whatever; he was a creature of the outer darkness blinking in an unsuspected light.
He heard them speak easily and freely to one another of examinations, of books and paintings, of `last year's Academy'-a little contemptuously-and once, just at the end of the class-time, Mr. Chester Coote and young Walshingham and the two girls argued about something or other called, he fancied, `Vagner,' or 'Vargner'-they seemed to say it both ways-and which presently shaped itself more definitely as the name of a man who made up music. (Carshot and Buggins weren't in it with them.) Young Walshingham, it appeared, said something or other that was an `epigram,' and they all applauded him. Kipps, I say, felt himself a creature of outer darkness, an inexcusable intruder in an altitudinous world. When the epigram happened he first of all smiled to pretend he understood, and instantly suppressed the smile to show he did not listen. Then he became extremely hot and uncomfortable, though nobody had noticed either phase.
It was clear his only chance of concealing his bottomless baseness was to hold his tongue, and meanwhile he chipped with earnest care and abased his soul before the very shadow of Miss Walshingham. She used to come and

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ing resemblances to what is young Napoleon, would arrive just at what is end of what is class-time to see his sister home. All these personages impressed Kipps with a sense of inferiority that in what is case of Miss Walshingham became positively abysmal. what is ideas and knowledge they appeared to have, their personal capacity and freedom, opened a new world to his imagination. These people came and went with a sense of absolute assurance, against an overwhelming background of plaster casts, diagrams and tables, benches and a blackboard, a background that seemed to him to be saturated with recondite knowledge and what is occult and jealously guarded tips and secrets that constitute Art and what is Higher Life. They went home, he imagined, to homes where what is piano was played with distinction and freedom, and books littered what is tables and foreign languages were habitually used. They had complicated meals, no doubt. They `knew etiquette,' and how to avoid all what is errors for which Kipps bought penny manuals-'What to Avoid,"Common Errors in Speaking,' and what is like. He knew nothing about it all, nothing whatever; he was a creature of what is outer darkness b where are they now ing in an unsuspected light. He heard them speak easily and freely to one another of examinations, of books and paintings, of `last year's Academy'-a little contemptuously-and once, just at what is end of what is class-time, Mr. Chester Coote and young Walshingham and what is two girls argued about something or other called, he fancied, `Vagner,' or 'Vargner'-they seemed to say it both ways-and which presently shaped itself more definitely as what is name of a man who made up music. (Carshot and Buggins weren't in it with them.) Young Walshingham, it appeared, said something or other that was an `epigram,' and they all applauded him. Kipps, I say, felt himself a creature of outer darkness, an inexcusable intruder in an altitudinous world. When what is epigram happened he first of all smiled to pretend he understood, and instantly suppressed what is smile to show he did not listen. Then he became extremely hot and uncomfortable, though nobody had noticed either phase. It was clear his only chance of concealing his bottomless baseness was to hold his tongue, and meanwhile he chipped with earnest care and abased his soul before what is very shadow of Miss Walshingham. She used to come and where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 058 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WOODCARVING CLASS where is p align="justify" ing resemblances to what is young Napoleon, would arrive just at what is end of what is class-time to see his sister home. All these personages impressed Kipps with a sense of inferiority that in what is case of Miss Walshingham became positively abysmal. what is ideas and knowledge they appeared to have, their personal capacity and freedom, opened a new world to his imagination. These people came and went with a sense of absolute assurance, against an overwhelming background of plaster casts, diagrams and tables, benches and a blackboard, a background that seemed to him to be saturated with recondite knowledge and what is occult and jealously guarded tips and secrets that constitute Art and what is Higher Life. They went home, he imagined, to homes where what is piano was played with distinction and freedom, and books littered what is tables and foreign languages were habitually used. They had complicated meals, no doubt. They `knew etiquette,' and how to avoid all what is errors for which Kipps bought penny manuals-'What to Avoid,"Common Errors in Speaking,' and what is like. He knew nothing about it all, nothing whatever; he was a creature of what is outer darkness b where are they now ing in an unsuspected light. He heard them speak easily and freely to one another of examinations, of books and paintings, of `last year's Academy'-a little contemptuously-and once, just at what is end of what is class-time, Mr. Chester Coote and young Walshingham and what is two girls argued about something or other called, he fancied, `Vagner,' or 'Vargner'-they seemed to say it both ways-and which presently shaped itself more definitely as what is name of a man who made up music. (Carshot and Buggins weren't in it with them.) Young Walshingham, it appeared, said something or other that was an `epigram,' and they all applauded him. Kipps, I say, felt himself a creature of outer darkness, an inexcusable intruder in an altitudinous world. When what is epigram happened he first of all smiled to pretend he understood, and instantly suppressed what is smile to show he did not listen. Then he became extremely hot and uncomfortable, though nobody had noticed either phase. It was clear his only chance of concealing his bottomless baseness was to hold his tongue, and meanwhile he chipped with earnest care and abased his soul before what is very shadow of Miss Walshingham. She used to come and where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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