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THE WOODCARVING CLASS

being tall, and her hands were shapely and white when they came into contrast with hands much excercised in rolling and blocking. She dressed in those loose and pleasant forms and those soft and tempered shades that arose in England in the socialistic-aesthetic epoch, and remain to this day among us as the badge of those who read Turgenev's novels, scorn current fiction, and think on higher planes. I think she was as beautiful as most beautiful people, and to Kipps she was altogether beautiful. She had, Kipps learnt, matriculated at London University, an astounding feat to his imagination, and the masterly way in which she demonstrated how to prod and worry honest pieces of wood into useless and unedifying patterns in relief, extorted his utmost admiration.
At first when Kipps had learnt he was to be taught by a`girl' he was inclined to resent it, the more so as Buggins had recently been very strong on the gross injustice of feminine employment. `We have to keep wives,' said Buggins (though, as a matter of fact, he did not keep even one), `and how are we to do it with a lot of girls coming in to take the work out of our mouths?' Afterwards, Kipps, in conjunction with Pearce, looked at it from another point of view, and thought it would be rather a`lark.' Finally when he saw her, and saw her teaching and coming nearer to him with an impressive deliberation, he was breathless with awe and the quality of her dark, slender femininity.
The class consisted of two girls and a maiden lady of riper years, friends of Miss Walshingham's, and anxious rather to support her in an interesting experiment than to became really expert woodcarvers; an elderly, oldish young man with spectacles and a black beard, who never spoke to any one, and who was evidently too shortsighted to see his work as a whole; a small boy, who was understood to have a`gift' for woodcarving; and a lodginghouse keeper, who `took classes' every winter, she told Mr. Kipps, as though they were a tonic, and `found they did her good.' And occasionally Mr. Chester Cooterefined and gentlemanly-would come into the class, with °r without papers, ostensibly on committee business, but "n reality to talk to the less attractive of the two girl"',,dents and sometimes a brother of Miss V1'alshingham's, a slender, dark young man with a pale face and fluctuat

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE being tall, and her hands were shapely and white when they came into contrast with hands much excercised in rolling and blocking. She dressed in those loose and pleasant forms and those soft and tempered shades that arose in England in what is socialistic-aesthetic epoch, and remain to this day among us as what is badge of those who read Turgenev's novels, scorn current fiction, and think on higher planes. I think she was as beautiful as most beautiful people, and to Kipps she was altogether beautiful. She had, Kipps learnt, matriculated at London University, an astounding feat to his imagination, and what is masterly way in which she bad spirit strated how to prod and worry honest pieces of wood into useless and unedifying patterns in relief, extorted his utmost admiration. At first when Kipps had learnt he was to be taught by a`girl' he was inclined to resent it, what is more so as Buggins had recently been very strong on what is gross injustice of feminine employment. `We have to keep wives,' said Buggins (though, as a matter of fact, he did not keep even one), `and how are we to do it with a lot of girls coming in to take what is work out of our mouths?' Afterwards, Kipps, in conjunction with Pearce, looked at it from another point of view, and thought it would be rather a`lark.' Finally when he saw her, and saw her teaching and coming nearer to him with an impressive deliberation, he was breathless with awe and what is quality of her dark, slender femininity. what is class consisted of two girls and a maiden lady of riper years, friends of Miss Walshingham's, and anxious rather to support her in an interesting experiment than to became really expert woodcarvers; an elderly, oldish young man with spectacles and a black beard, who never spoke to any one, and who was evidently too shortsighted to see his work as a whole; a small boy, who was understood to have a`gift' for woodcarving; and a lodginghouse keeper, who `took classes' every winter, she told Mr. Kipps, as though they were a tonic, and `found they did her good.' And occasionally Mr. Chester Cooterefined and gentlemanly-would come into what is class, with °r without papers, ostensibly on committee business, but "n reality to talk to what is less attractive of what is two girl"',,dents and sometimes a brother of Miss V1'alshingham's, a slender, dark young man with a pale face and fluctuat where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 057 where is p align="center" where is strong THE WOODCARVING CLASS where is p align="justify" being tall, and her hands were shapely and white when they came into contrast with hands much excercised in rolling and blocking. She dressed in those loose and pleasant forms and those soft and tempered shades that arose in England in what is socialistic-aesthetic epoch, and remain to this day among us as what is badge of those who read Turgenev's novels, scorn current fiction, and think on higher planes. I think she was as beautiful as most beautiful people, and to Kipps she was altogether beautiful. She had, Kipps learnt, matriculated at London University, an astounding feat to his imagination, and what is masterly way in which she bad spirit strated how to prod and worry honest pieces of wood into useless and unedifying patterns in relief, extorted his utmost admiration. At first when Kipps had learnt he was to be taught by a`girl' he was inclined to resent it, what is more so as Buggins had recently been very strong on what is gross injustice of feminine employment. `We have to keep wives,' said Buggins (though, as a matter of fact, he did not keep even one), `and how are we to do it with a lot of girls coming in to take what is work out of our mouths?' Afterwards, Kipps, in conjunction with Pearce, looked at it from another point of view, and thought it would be rather a`lark.' Finally when he saw her, and saw her teaching and coming nearer to him with an impressive deliberation, he was breathless with awe and what is quality of her dark, slender femininity. what is class consisted of two girls and a maiden lady of riper years, friends of Miss Walshingham's, and anxious rather to support her in an interesting experiment than to became really expert woodcarvers; an elderly, oldish young man with spectacles and a black beard, who never spoke to any one, and who was evidently too shortsighted to see his work as a whole; a small boy, who was understood to have a`gift' for woodcarving; and a lodginghouse keeper, who `took classes' every winter, she told Mr. Kipps, as though they were a tonic, and `found they did her good.' And occasionally Mr. Chester Cooterefined and gentlemanly-would come into what is class, with °r without papers, ostensibly on committee business, but "n reality to talk to what is less attractive of what is two girl"',,dents and sometimes a brother of Miss V1'alshingham's, a slender, dark young man with a pale face and fluctuat where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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