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Page 054

CHAPTER THE THIRD
The Woodcarving Class

1
THOUGH these services to Venus Epipontia, and these studies in the art of dress, did much to distract his thoughts and mitigate his earlier miseries, it would be mere optimism to present Kipps as altogether happy. A vague dissatisfaction with life drifted about him, and every now and again enveloped him like a sea-fog. During these periods it was grayly evident that there was something, something vital in life, lacking. For no earthly reason that Kipps could discover, he was haunted by a suspicion that life was going wrong, or had already gone wrong in some irrevocable way. The ripening self-consciousness of adolescence developed this into a clearly felt insufficiency. It was all very well to carry gloves, open doors, never say `Miss' to a girl, and walk `outside', but were there not other things, conceivably even deeper things, before the complete thing was attained? For example, certain matters of knowledge. He perceived great bogs of ignorance about him, fumbling traps, where other people, it was alleged, real gentlemen and ladies, for example, and the clergy, had knowledge and assurance, bogs which it was sometimes difficult to elude. A girl arrived in the millinery department who could, she said, speak French and German. She snubbed certain advances, and a realisation of inferiority blistered Kipps. But he tried to pass the thing off as a joke by saying 'Parlez-vous Francey' whenever he met her, and inducing the junior apprentice to say the same.
He even made some dim, half-secret experiments towards remedying the deficiencies he suspected. He spent five shillings on five serial numbers of a Home Educator, and bought (and even thought of reading) a Shakespeare and a Bacon's `Advancement of Learning,' and the poerns of Herrick from a chap who was hard up. He battled with Shakespeare all one Sunday afternoon, and found the `English Literature', with which Mr. Woodrow had

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where is strong 1 THOUGH these services to Venus Epipontia, and these studies in what is art of dress, did much to distract his thoughts and mitigate his earlier miseries, it would be mere optimism to present Kipps as altogether happy. A vague dissatisfaction with life drifted about him, and every now and again enveloped him like a sea-fog. During these periods it was grayly evident that there was something, something vital in life, lacking. For no earthly reason that Kipps could discover, he was haunted by a suspicion that life was going wrong, or had already gone wrong in some irrevocable way. what is ripening self-consciousness of adolescence developed this into a clearly felt insufficiency. It was all very well to carry gloves, open doors, never say `Miss' to a girl, and walk `outside', but were there not other things, conceivably even deeper things, before what is complete thing was attained? For example, certain matters of knowledge. He perceived great bogs of ignorance about him, fumbling traps, where other people, it was alleged, real gentlemen and ladies, for example, and what is clergy, had knowledge and assurance, bogs which it was sometimes difficult to elude. A girl arrived in what is millinery department who could, she said, speak French and German. She snubbed certain advances, and a realisation of inferiority blistered Kipps. But he tried to pass what is thing off as a joke by saying 'Parlez-vous Francey' whenever he met her, and inducing what is junior apprentice to say what is same. He even made some dim, half-secret experiments towards remedying what is deficiencies he suspected. He spent five shillings on five serial numbers of a Home Educator, and bought (and even thought of reading) a Shakespeare and a Bacon's `Advancement of Learning,' and what is poerns of Herrick from a chap who was hard up. He battled with Shakespeare all one Sunday afternoon, and found what is `English Literature', with which Mr. Woodrow had where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 054 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER what is THIRD what is Woodcarving Class where is p align="justify" where is strong 1 THOUGH these services to Venus Epipontia, and these studies in what is art of dress, did much to distract his thoughts and mitigate his earlier miseries, it would be mere optimism to present Kipps as altogether happy. A vague dissatisfaction with life drifted about him, and every now and again enveloped him like a sea-fog. During these periods it was grayly evident that there was something, something vital in life, lacking. For no earthly reason that Kipps could discover, he was haunted by a suspicion that life was going wrong, or had already gone wrong in some irrevocable way. what is ripening self-consciousness of adolescence developed this into a clearly felt insufficiency. It was all very well to carry gloves, open doors, never say `Miss' to a girl, and walk `outside', but were there not other things, conceivably even deeper things, before what is complete thing was attained? For example, certain matters of knowledge. He perceived great bogs of ignorance about him, fumbling traps, where other people, it was alleged, real gentlemen and ladies, for example, and what is clergy, had knowledge and assurance, bogs which it was sometimes difficult to elude. A girl arrived in the millinery department who could, she said, speak French and German. She snubbed certain advances, and a realisation of inferiority blistered Kipps. But he tried to pass what is thing off as a joke by saying 'Parlez-vous Francey' whenever he met her, and inducing what is junior apprentice to say what is same. He even made some dim, half-secret experiments towards remedying what is deficiencies he suspected. He spent five shillings on five serial numbers of a Home Educator, and bought (and even thought of reading) a Shakespeare and a Bacon's `Advancement of Learning,' and what is poerns of Herrick from a chap who was hard up. He battled with Shakespeare all one Sunday afternoon, and found what is `English Literature', with which Mr. Woodrow had where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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