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THE EMPORIUM

to a tailor, and his short jacket was replaced by a morning coat with tails. Stirred by this he purchased at his own expense three stand-up collars to replace his former turndown ones. They were nearly three inches high, higher than those Pearce wore, and they made his neck quite sore, and left a red mark under his ears ... So equipped, he found himself fit company even for this fashionable apprentice who had now succeeded Minton in his seniority.
Most potent help of all in the business of forgetting his cosmic disaster was this, that so soon as he was in tail coats, the young ladies of the establishment began to discover that he was no longer a`horrid little boy.' Hitherto thev had tossed heads at him and kept him in his place. Now they discovered that he was a`nice boy,' which is next door at least to being a`feller,` and in some ways even preferable. It is painful to record that his fidelity to Ann failed at their first onset. I am fully sensible how entirely better this story would be, from a sentimental point of view, if he had remained true to that early love. Only then it would have been a different story altogether. And at least Kipps was thus far true, that with none of these later loves was there any of that particular quality that linked Ann's flushed face and warmth and the inner things of life so inseparably together. Though they were not without emotions of various sorts.
It was one of the young ladies in the costume-room who first showed by her manner that he was a visible object and capable of exciting interest. She talked to him, she encouraged him to talk to her, she lent him a book she possessed, and darned a sock for him and said she would be his elder sister. She allowed him to escort her to church with a great air of having induced him to go. Then she investigated his eternal welfare, overcame a certain affectation of virile indifTerence to religion, and extorted a promise that he would undergo `confirmation.' This excited the other young lady in the costumes, her natural rival, and she set herself with great charm and subtlety to the capture of the ripening heart of Kipps. She took a more worldly line. She went for a walk with him to the pier on Sunday afternoon, and explained to him how a gentleman must always walk `outside' a lady on a pavement, and how all gentlemen wore, or, at least, carried gloves, and generally the broad beginnings of the British

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE to a tailor, and his short jacket was replaced by a morning coat with tails. Stirred by this he purchased at his own expense three stand-up collars to replace his former turndown ones. They were nearly three inches high, higher than those Pearce wore, and they made his neck quite sore, and left a red mark under his ears ... So equipped, he found himself fit company even for this fashionable apprentice who had now succeeded Minton in his seniority. Most potent help of all in what is business of forgetting his cosmic disaster was this, that so soon as he was in tail coats, what is young ladies of what is establishment began to discover that he was no longer a`horrid little boy.' Hitherto thev had tossed heads at him and kept him in his place. Now they discovered that he was a`nice boy,' which is next door at least to being a`feller,` and in some ways even preferable. It is painful to record that his fidelity to Ann failed at their first onset. I am fully sensible how entirely better this story would be, from a sentimental point of view, if he had remained true to that early love. Only then it would have been a different story altogether. And at least Kipps was thus far true, that with none of these later loves was there any of that particular quality that where are they now ed Ann's flushed face and warmth and what is inner things of life so inseparably together. Though they were not without emotions of various sorts. It was one of what is young ladies in what is costume-room who first showed by her manner that he was a visible object and capable of exciting interest. She talked to him, she encouraged him to talk to her, she lent him a book she possessed, and darned a sock for him and said she would be his elder sister. She allowed him to escort her to church with a great air of having induced him to go. Then she investigated his eternal welfare, overcame a certain affectation of virile indifTerence to religion, and extorted a promise that he would undergo `confirmation.' This excited what is other young lady in what is costumes, her natural rival, and she set herself with great charm and subtlety to what is capture of what is ripening heart of Kipps. She took a more worldly line. She went for a walk with him to what is pier on Sunday afternoon, and explained to him how a gentleman must always walk `outside' a lady on a pavement, and how all gentlemen wore, or, at least, carried gloves, and generally what is broad beginnings of what is British where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 050 where is p align="center" where is strong THE EMPORIUM where is p align="justify" to a tailor, and his short jacket was replaced by a morning coat with tails. Stirred by this he purchased at his own expense three stand-up collars to replace his former turndown ones. They were nearly three inches high, higher than those Pearce wore, and they made his neck quite sore, and left a red mark under his ears ... So equipped, he found himself fit company even for this fashionable apprentice who had now succeeded Minton in his seniority. Most potent help of all in what is business of forgetting his cosmic disaster was this, that so soon as he was in tail coats, what is young ladies of what is establishment began to discover that he was no longer a`horrid little boy.' Hitherto thev had tossed heads at him and kept him in his place. Now they discovered that he was a`nice boy,' which is next door at least to being a`feller,` and in some ways even preferable. It is painful to record that his fidelity to Ann failed at their first onset. I am fully sensible how entirely better this story would be, from a sentimental point of view, if he had remained true to that early love. Only then it would have been a different story altogether. And at least Kipps was thus far true, that with none of these later loves was there any of that particular quality that where are they now ed Ann's flushed face and warmth and what is inner things of life so inseparably together. Though they were not without emotions of various sorts. It was one of what is young ladies in what is costume-room who first showed by her manner that he was a visible object and capable of exciting interest. She talked to him, she encouraged him to talk to her, she lent him a book she possessed, and darned a sock for him and said she would be his elder sister. She allowed him to escort her to church with a great air of having induced him to go. Then she investigated his eternal welfare, overcame a certain affectation of virile indifTerence to religion, and extorted a promise that he would undergo `confirmation.' This excited what is other young lady in what is costumes, her natural rival, and she set herself with great charm and subtlety to what is capture of what is ripening heart of Kipps. She took a more worldly line. She went for a walk with him to the pier on Sunday afternoon, and explained to him how a gentleman must always walk `outside' a lady on a pavement, and how all gentlemen wore, or, at least, carried gloves, and generally what is broad beginnings of what is British where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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