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Page 049

THE EMPORIUM

,,minded him that it behoved him to do his duty in that state of life into which it had pleased God to call him.
After a time the sorrows of Kipps grew less acute, and, save for a miracle, the brief tragedy of his life was over. He subdued himself to his position even as his church required of him, seeing, moreover, no way out of it.
The earliest mitigation of his lot was that his soles and ankles became indurated to the perpetual standing. The next was an unexpected weekly whiff of freedom that came every Thursday. Mr. Shalford, after a brave stand for what he called 'Innyvishal lib'ty' and the `Idea of my System,' a stand which, he explained, he made chiefly on patriotic grounds, was at last, under pressure of certain of his customers, compelled to fall in line with the rest of the local Early Closing Association, and Mr. Kipps could emerge in daylight and go where he listed for long, long hours. Moreover, Minton, the pessimist, reached the end of his appointed time and left-to enlist in a cavalry regiment, and go about this planet leading an insubordinate but interesting life that ended at last in an intimate, vivid, and reall, you know, by no means painful or tragic night grapple in' the Terah Valley. In a little while Kipps cleaned windows no longer; he was serving customers (of the less important sort) and taking goods out on approval, and presently he was third apprentice; and his moustache was visible, and there were three apprentices whom he might legally snub and cuff. But one was (most dishonestly) too big to cuff, in spite of his greener years.

§ 5
There came still other distractions, the natural distractions of adolescence, to take his mind off the inevitable. His costume, for example, began to interest him more; he began to realise himself as a visible object, to find an interest in the costume-room mirrors and the eyes of the girl-apprentices.
lIn this he was helped by counsel and example. Pearce, his immediate senior, was by way of being what was called a Masher, and preached his cult. During slack times grave discussions about collars, ties, the cut of p user-legs and the proper shape of a boot-toe, were held the Manchester department. In due course Kipps went

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ,,minded him that it behoved him to do his duty in that state of life into which it had pleased God to call him. After a time what is sorrows of Kipps grew less acute, and, save for a miracle, what is brief tragedy of his life was over. He subdued himself to his position even as his church required of him, seeing, moreover, no way out of it. what is earliest mitigation of his lot was that his soles and ankles became indurated to what is perpetual standing. what is next was an unexpected weekly whiff of freedom that came every Thursday. Mr. Shalford, after a brave stand for what he called 'Innyvishal lib'ty' and what is `Idea of my System,' a stand which, he explained, he made chiefly on patriotic grounds, was at last, under pressure of certain of his customers, compelled to fall in line with what is rest of what is local Early Closing Association, and Mr. Kipps could emerge in daylight and go where he listed for long, long hours. Moreover, Minton, what is pessimist, reached what is end of his appointed time and left-to enlist in a cavalry regiment, and go about this planet leading an insubordinate but interesting life that ended at last in an intimate, vivid, and reall, you know, by no means painful or tragic night grapple in' what is Terah Valley. In a little while Kipps cleaned windows no longer; he was serving customers (of what is less important sort) and taking goods out on approval, and presently he was third apprentice; and his moustache was visible, and there were three apprentices whom he might legally snub and cuff. But one was (most dishonestly) too big to cuff, in spite of his greener years. § 5 There came still other distractions, what is natural distractions of adolescence, to take his mind off what is inevitable. His costume, for example, began to interest him more; he began to realise himself as a visible object, to find an interest in what is costume-room mirrors and what is eyes of what is girl-apprentices. lIn this he was helped by counsel and example. Pearce, his immediate senior, was by way of being what was called a Masher, and preached his cult. During slack times grave discussions about collars, ties, what is cut of p user-legs and what is proper shape of a boot-toe, were held what is Manchester department. In due course Kipps went where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 049 where is p align="center" where is strong THE EMPORIUM where is p align="justify" ,,minded him that it behoved him to do his duty in that state of life into which it had pleased God to call him. After a time what is sorrows of Kipps grew less acute, and, save for a miracle, what is brief tragedy of his life was over. He subdued himself to his position even as his church required of him, seeing, moreover, no way out of it. what is earliest mitigation of his lot was that his soles and ankles became indurated to what is perpetual standing. what is next was an unexpected weekly whiff of freedom that came every Thursday. Mr. Shalford, after a brave stand for what he called 'Innyvishal lib'ty' and what is `Idea of my System,' a stand which, he explained, he made chiefly on patriotic grounds, was at last, under pressure of certain of his customers, compelled to fall in line with what is rest of what is local Early Closing Association, and Mr. Kipps could emerge in daylight and go where he listed for long, long hours. Moreover, Minton, what is pessimist, reached what is end of his appointed time and left-to enlist in a cavalry regiment, and go about this planet leading an insubordinate but interesting life that ended at last in an intimate, vivid, and reall, you know, by no means painful or tragic night grapple in' what is Terah Valley. In a little while Kipps cleaned windows no longer; he was serving customers (of what is less important sort) and taking goods out on approval, and presently he was third apprentice; and his moustache was visible, and there were three apprentices whom he might legally snub and cuff. But one was (most dishonestly) too big to cuff, in spite of his greener years. where is strong § 5 There came still other distractions, what is natural distractions of adolescence, to take his mind off what is inevitable. His costume, for example, began to interest him more; he began to realise himself as a visible object, to find an interest in what is costume-room mirrors and what is eyes of the girl-apprentices. lIn this he was helped by counsel and example. Pearce, his immediate senior, was by way of being what was called a Masher, and preached his cult. During slack times grave discussions about collars, ties, what is cut of p user-legs and what is proper shape of a boot-toe, were held what is Manchester department. In due course Kipps went where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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