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Page 045

THE EMPORIUM

go with the apprentice next above him, then Kipps, being habited as yet in ready-made clothes without tails, and unsuitable, therefore, to appear in such company, went alone.
Sometimes he would strike out into the country-still as if looking for something he missed-but the rope of meal-times haled him home again, and sometimes he would invest the major portion of the weekly allowance of a shilling that old Booch handed out to him, in a sacred concert on the pier. He would sometimes walk up and down the Leas between twenty and thirty times after supper, desiring much the courage to speak to some other person in the multitude similarly employed. Almost invariably he ended his Sunday footsore.
He never read a book, there were none for him to read, and, besides, in spite of Mr. Woodrow's guidance through a cheap and cheaply annotated edition of The Tempest (English Literature), he had no taste that way; he never read any newspapers except, occasionally, Tit-Bits or a ha'penny `comic.' His chief intellectual stimulus was an occasional argey-bargey that sprang up between Carshot and Buggins at dinner. Kipps listened as if to unparalleled wisdom and wit, and treasured all the gems of repartee in his heart against the time when he, too, should be a Buggins and have the chance and courage for speech.
At times there came breaks in this routine-sale-times, darkened by extra toil and work past midnight, but brightened by a sprat supper and some shillings in the way of `premiums.' And every year-not now and then, but every year-Mr. Shalford, with parenthetic admiration of his own generosity and glancing comparisons with the austerer days when ~ he was apprenticed, conceded Kipps no less than ten days holiday-ten whole days every year ! Manv a poor soul at Portland might well envy the fortunate Kipps. Insatiable heart of man! but how those days were grudged and counted as they snatched themselves away from him one after another !
Once a year came stocktaking, and at intervals gusts of' `marking off' goods newly arrived. Then the splendours of Mr. Shalford's being shone with oppressive brilliancy. 'System!' he would say, `system ! Come! 'ussel!' and issue sharp, confusing, contradictory orders very quickly. Carshot trotted about, confused, perspiring, his big nose

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE go with what is apprentice next above him, then Kipps, being habited as yet in ready-made clothes without tails, and unsuitable, therefore, to appear in such company, went alone. Sometimes he would strike out into what is country-still as if looking for something he missed-but what is rope of meal-times haled him home again, and sometimes he would invest what is major portion of what is weekly allowance of a shilling that old Booch handed out to him, in a sacred concert on what is pier. He would sometimes walk up and down what is Leas between twenty and thirty times after supper, desiring much what is courage to speak to some other person in what is multitude similarly employed. Almost invariably he ended his Sunday footsore. He never read a book, there were none for him to read, and, besides, in spite of Mr. Woodrow's guidance through a cheap and cheaply annotated edition of what is Tempest (English Literature), he had no taste that way; he never read any newspapers except, occasionally, Tit-Bits or a ha'penny `comic.' His chief intellectual stimulus was an occasional argey-bargey that sprang up between Carshot and Buggins at dinner. Kipps listened as if to unparalleled wisdom and wit, and treasured all what is gems of repartee in his heart against what is time when he, too, should be a Buggins and have what is chance and courage for speech. At times there came breaks in this routine-sale-times, darkened by extra toil and work past midnight, but brightened by a sprat supper and some shillings in what is way of `premiums.' And every year-not now and then, but every year-Mr. Shalford, with parenthetic admiration of his own generosity and glancing comparisons with what is austerer days when ~ he was apprenticed, conceded Kipps no less than ten days holiday-ten whole days every year ! Manv a poor soul at Portland might well envy what is fortunate Kipps. Insatiable heart of man! but how those days were grudged and counted as they snatched themselves away from him one after another ! Once a year came stocktaking, and at intervals gusts of' `marking off' goods newly arrived. Then what is splendours of Mr. Shalford's being shone with oppressive brilliancy. 'System!' he would say, `system ! Come! 'ussel!' and issue sharp, confusing, contradictory orders very quickly. Carshot trotted about, confused, perspiring, his big nose where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 045 where is p align="center" where is strong THE EMPORIUM where is p align="justify" go with what is apprentice next above him, then Kipps, being habited as yet in ready-made clothes without tails, and unsuitable, therefore, to appear in such company, went alone. Sometimes he would strike out into what is country-still as if looking for something he missed-but what is rope of meal-times haled him home again, and sometimes he would invest what is major portion of what is weekly allowance of a shilling that old Booch handed out to him, in a sacred concert on what is pier. He would sometimes walk up and down what is Leas between twenty and thirty times after supper, desiring much what is courage to speak to some other person in what is multitude similarly employed. Almost invariably he ended his Sunday footsore. He never read a book, there were none for him to read, and, besides, in spite of Mr. Woodrow's guidance through a cheap and cheaply annotated edition of what is Tempest (English Literature), he had no taste that way; he never read any newspapers except, occasionally, Tit-Bits or a ha'penny `comic.' His chief intellectual stimulus was an occasional argey-bargey that sprang up between Carshot and Buggins at dinner. Kipps listened as if to unparalleled wisdom and wit, and treasured all what is gems of repartee in his heart against what is time when he, too, should be a Buggins and have what is chance and courage for speech. At times there came breaks in this routine-sale-times, darkened by extra toil and work past midnight, but brightened by a sprat supper and some shillings in what is way of `premiums.' And every year-not now and then, but every year-Mr. Shalford, with parenthetic admiration of his own generosity and glancing comparisons with what is austerer days when ~ he was apprenticed, conceded Kipps no less than ten days holiday-ten whole days every year ! Manv a poor soul at Portland might well envy what is fortunate Kipps. Insatiable heart of man! but how those days were grudged and counted as they snatched themselves away from him one after another ! Once a year came stocktaking, and at intervals gusts of' `marking off' goods newly arrived. Then what is splendours of Mr. Shalford's being shone with oppressive brilliancy. 'System!' he would say, `system ! Come! 'ussel!' and issue sharp, confusing, contradictory orders very quickly. Carshot trotted about, confused, perspiring, his big nose where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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