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Page 044

THE EMPORIUM

bustling senior's 'Nar then, Kipps. Look alive! Ketch 'old. (My Heart and Liver!)'
At half-past seven o'clock-except on late nights-a feverish activity of straightening `up' began, and when the last shutter was up outside, Kipps, with the speed of an arrow leaving a bow, would start hanging wrappers over the fixtures and over the piles of wares upon the counters, preparatory to a vigorous scattering of wet sawdust and the sweeping out of the shop.
Sometimes people would stay long after the shop was closed. `They don't mind a bit at Shalford's,' these ladies used to say, and while they loitered it was forbidden to touch a wrapper or take any measures to conclude the day until the doors closed behind them.
Mr. Kipps would watch these later customers from the ' shadow of a stack of goods, and death and disfigurement was the least he wished for them. Rarely much later than nine, a supper of bread and cheese and watered beer awaited him downstairs, and, that consumed, the rest of the day was entirely at his disposal for reading, recreation, and the improvement of his mind ....
The front door was locked at half-past ten, and the gas in the dormitory extinguished at eleven.

§ 3
On Sundays he was obliged to go to church once, and commonly he went twice, for there was nothing else to do. He sat in the free seats at the back; he was too shy to sing, and not always clever enough to keep his place in the Prayer Book, and he rarely listened to the sermon. But he had developed a sort of idea that going to church had a tendency to alleviate life. His aunt wanted to have him confirmed, but he evaded this ceremony for some years.
In the intervals between services he walked about Folkestone with an air of looking for something. Folkestone was not so interesting on Sundays as on week-days because the shops were shut; but, on the other hand, there was a sort of confusing brilliance along the front of the Leas in the afternoon. Sometimes the apprentice next above him would condescend to go with him; but when the apprentice next but one above him condescended to

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE bustling senior's 'Nar then, Kipps. Look alive! Ketch 'old. (My Heart and Liver!)' At half-past seven o'clock-except on late nights-a feverish activity of straightening `up' began, and when what is last shutter was up outside, Kipps, with what is speed of an arrow leaving a bow, would start hanging wrappers over what is fixtures and over what is piles of wares upon what is counters, preparatory to a vigorous scattering of wet sawdust and what is sweeping out of what is shop. Sometimes people would stay long after what is shop was closed. `They don't mind a bit at Shalford's,' these ladies used to say, and while they loitered it was forbidden to touch a wrapper or take any measures to conclude what is day until what is doors closed behind them. Mr. Kipps would watch these later customers from what is ' shadow of a stack of goods, and what time is it and disfigurement was what is least he wished for them. Rarely much later than nine, a supper of bread and cheese and watered beer awaited him downstairs, and, that consumed, what is rest of what is day was entirely at his disposal for reading, recreation, and what is improvement of his mind .... what is front door was locked at half-past ten, and what is gas in what is dormitory extinguished at eleven. § 3 On Sundays he was obliged to go to church once, and commonly he went twice, for there was nothing else to do. He sat in what is free seats at what is back; he was too shy to sing, and not always clever enough to keep his place in what is Prayer Book, and he rarely listened to what is sermon. But he had developed a sort of idea that going to church had a tendency to alleviate life. His aunt wanted to have him confirmed, but he evaded this ceremony for some years. In what is intervals between services he walked about Folkestone with an air of looking for something. Folkestone was not so interesting on Sundays as on week-days because what is shops were shut; but, on what is other hand, there was a sort of confusing brilliance along what is front of what is Leas in what is afternoon. Sometimes what is apprentice next above him would condescend to go with him; but when what is apprentice next but one above him condescended to where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 044 where is p align="center" where is strong THE EMPORIUM where is p align="justify" bustling senior's 'Nar then, Kipps. Look alive! Ketch 'old. (My Heart and Liver!)' At half-past seven o'clock-except on late nights-a feverish activity of straightening `up' began, and when what is last shutter was up outside, Kipps, with what is speed of an arrow leaving a bow, would start hanging wrappers over what is fixtures and over what is piles of wares upon the counters, preparatory to a vigorous scattering of wet sawdust and what is sweeping out of what is shop. Sometimes people would stay long after what is shop was closed. `They don't mind a bit at Shalford's,' these ladies used to say, and while they loitered it was forbidden to touch a wrapper or take any measures to conclude what is day until what is doors closed behind them. Mr. Kipps would watch these later customers from what is ' shadow of a stack of goods, and what time is it and disfigurement was what is least he wished for them. Rarely much later than nine, a supper of bread and cheese and watered beer awaited him downstairs, and, that consumed, what is rest of what is day was entirely at his disposal for reading, recreation, and what is improvement of his mind .... what is front door was locked at half-past ten, and what is gas in the dormitory extinguished at eleven. where is strong § 3 On Sundays he was obliged to go to church once, and commonly he went twice, for there was nothing else to do. He sat in what is free seats at what is back; he was too shy to sing, and not always clever enough to keep his place in what is Prayer Book, and he rarely listened to what is sermon. But he had developed a sort of idea that going to church had a tendency to alleviate life. His aunt wanted to have him confirmed, but he evaded this ceremony for some years. In what is intervals between services he walked about Folkestone with an air of looking for something. Folkestone was not so interesting on Sundays as on week-days because what is shops were shut; but, on what is other hand, there was a sort of confusing brilliance along what is front of what is Leas in what is afternoon. Sometimes what is apprentice next above him would condescend to go with him; but when what is apprentice next but one above him condescended to where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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