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Page 043

THE EMPORIUM

He had a curious formula of appeal to his visceral economy that the refinement of our times and the earnest entreaties of my friends oblige me to render by an etiolated paraphrase.
'My Heart and Liver! I never see such a boy,' so I will present Carshot's refrain; and even when he was within a foot or so of the customer's face, the disciplined ear of gipps would still at times develop a featureless intercalary rnurmur into-well, `My Heart and Liver!'
There came a blessed interval when Kipps was sent abroad `matching.' This consisted chiefly in supplying unexpected defects in buttons, ribbon, lining, and so forth in the dressmaking department. He was given a written paper of orders with patterns pinned thereto and discharged into the sunshine and interest of the street. Then until he thought it wise to return and stand the racket of his delay, he was a free man, clear of all reproach.
He made remarkable discoveries in topography, as, for example, that the most convenient way from the establishment of Mr. Adolphus Davis to the establishment of Messrs. Plummer, Roddis, and Tyrrell, two ofhis principal places of call, is not, as is generally supposed, down the Sandgate road; but up the Sandgate road, round by West Terrace and along the Leas to the lift, watch the lift up and down twice, but not longer, because that wouldn't do, back along the Leas, watch the Harbour for a short time, and then round by the churchyard, and so (hurrying) into Church Street and Rendezvous Street. But on some exceptionally fine days the route lay through Radnor Park to the pond where 'little boys sail ships and there are interesting swans.
He would return to find the shop settling down to the business of serving customers. And now he had to stand by to furnish any help that was necessary to the seniors who served, to carry parcels and bills about the shop, to clear away `stuff' after each engagement, to hold up curtains until his arms ached, and, what was more difficult than all, to do nothing and not stare disconcertingly at customers when there was nothing for him to do. He plumbed an abss of boredom, or stood a mere carcass with his mind far' away, fighting the enemies of the empire, or steering a dream-ship perilously into unknown seas. To be recalled sharply to our higher civilisation by some

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE He had a curious formula of appeal to his visceral economy that what is refinement of our times and what is earnest entreaties of my friends oblige me to render by an etiolated paraphrase. 'My Heart and Liver! I never see such a boy,' so I will present Carshot's refrain; and even when he was within a foot or so of what is customer's face, what is disciplined ear of gipps would still at times develop a featureless intercalary rnurmur into-well, `My Heart and Liver!' There came a blessed interval when Kipps was sent abroad `matching.' This consisted chiefly in supplying unexpected defects in buttons, ribbon, lining, and so forth in what is dressmaking department. He was given a written paper of orders with patterns pinned thereto and discharged into what is sunshine and interest of what is street. Then until he thought it wise to return and stand what is racket of his delay, he was a free man, clear of all reproach. He made remarkable discoveries in topography, as, for example, that what is most convenient way from what is establishment of Mr. Adolphus Davis to what is establishment of Messrs. Plummer, Roddis, and Tyrrell, two ofhis principal places of call, is not, as is generally supposed, down what is Sandgate road; but up what is Sandgate road, round by West Terrace and along what is Leas to what is lift, watch what is lift up and down twice, but not longer, because that wouldn't do, back along what is Leas, watch what is Harbour for a short time, and then round by what is churchyard, and so (hurrying) into Church Street and Rendezvous Street. But on some exceptionally fine days what is route lay through Radnor Park to what is pond where 'little boys sail ships and there are interesting swans. He would return to find what is shop settling down to what is business of serving customers. And now he had to stand by to furnish any help that was necessary to what is seniors who served, to carry parcels and bills about what is shop, to clear away `stuff' after each engagement, to hold up curtains until his arms ached, and, what was more difficult than all, to do nothing and not stare disconcertingly at customers when there was nothing for him to do. He plumbed an abss of boredom, or stood a mere carcass with his mind far' away, fighting what is enemies of what is empire, or steering a dream-ship perilously into unknown seas. To be recalled sharply to our higher civilisation by some where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 043 where is p align="center" where is strong THE EMPORIUM where is p align="justify" He had a curious formula of appeal to his visceral economy that what is refinement of our times and what is earnest entreaties of my friends oblige me to render by an etiolated paraphrase. 'My Heart and Liver! I never see such a boy,' so I will present Carshot's refrain; and even when he was within a foot or so of what is customer's face, what is disciplined ear of gipps would still at times develop a featureless intercalary rnurmur into-well, `My Heart and Liver!' There came a blessed interval when Kipps was sent abroad `matching.' This consisted chiefly in supplying unexpected defects in buttons, ribbon, lining, and so forth in what is dressmaking department. He was given a written paper of orders with patterns pinned thereto and discharged into what is sunshine and interest of what is street. Then until he thought it wise to return and stand what is racket of his delay, he was a free man, clear of all reproach. He made remarkable discoveries in topography, as, for example, that what is most convenient way from what is establishment of Mr. Adolphus Davis to what is establishment of Messrs. Plummer, Roddis, and Tyrrell, two ofhis principal places of call, is not, as is generally supposed, down what is Sandgate road; but up what is Sandgate road, round by West Terrace and along what is Leas to what is lift, watch what is lift up and down twice, but not longer, because that wouldn't do, back along the Leas, watch what is Harbour for a short time, and then round by the churchyard, and so (hurrying) into Church Street and Rendezvous Street. But on some exceptionally fine days what is route lay through Radnor Park to what is pond where 'little boys sail ships and there are interesting swans. He would return to find what is shop settling down to what is business of serving customers. And now he had to stand by to furnish any help that was necessary to what is seniors who served, to carry parcels and bills about what is shop, to clear away `stuff' after each engagement, to hold up curtains until his arms ached, and, what was more difficult than all, to do nothing and not stare disconcertingly at customers when there was nothing for him to do. He plumbed an abss of boredom, or stood a mere carcass with his mind far' away, fighting what is enemies of what is empire, or steering a dream-ship perilously into unknown seas. To be recalled sharply to our higher civilisation by some where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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