Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 042

THE EMPORIUM

dwells. Kipps hurried from piling linen table-cloths, that were, collectively, as heavy as lead, to eat off oil-cloth in a gas-lit dining-room underground, and he dreamt of combing endless blankets beneath his overcoat, spare undershirt, and three newspapers, so he had at least the chance of learning the beginnings of philosophy.
In return for these benefits he worked so that he commonly went to bed exhausted and footsore. His round began at half-past six in the morning, when he would' descend, unwashed and shirtless, in old clothes and a~ scarf, and dust boxes and yawn, and take down wrappers and clean the windows until eight. Then in half an hour he would complete his toilet, and take an austere breakfast of bread and margarine and what only an Imperial Englishman would admit to be coffee, after which refreshment he ascended to the shop for the labours of the day.
Commonly these began with a mighty running to and fro with planks and boxes and goods for Carshot, the window-dresser, who, whether he worked well or ill, nagged persistently, by reason of a chronic indigestion, until the window was done. Sometimes the costume window had to be dressed, and then Kipps staggered down the whole length of the shop from the costume room with one after another of those ladylike shapes grasped firmly but shamefully each about her single ankle of wood. Such days as there was no window-dressing there was a mightly carrying and lifting of blocks and bales of goods into piles and stacks. After this there were terrible exercises, at first almost despairfully difficult; certain sorts ol goods that came in folded had to be rolled upon rollers,; and for the most part refused absolutely to be rolled, at any rate by Kipps; certain other sorts of goods that came from the wholesalers rolled had to be measured and folded, and folding makes young apprentices wish they were dead. All of it, too, quite avoidable trouble, you know, that is not avoided because of the cheapness of the genteeler sorts of labour and the dearness of forethought in the world. And then consignments of new goods had to be marked off and packed into paper parcels, and, Carshot packed like conjuring tricks, and Kipps packe like a boy with tastes in some other direction-no ascertained. And always Carshot nagged.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE dwells. Kipps hurried from piling linen table-cloths, that were, collectively, as heavy as lead, to eat off oil-cloth in a gas-lit dining-room underground, and he dreamt of combing endless blankets beneath his overcoat, spare undershirt, and three newspapers, so he had at least what is chance of learning what is beginnings of philosophy. In return for these benefits he worked so that he commonly went to bed exhausted and footsore. His round began at half-past six in what is morning, when he would' descend, unwashed and shirtless, in old clothes and a~ scarf, and dust boxes and yawn, and take down wrappers and clean what is windows until eight. Then in half an hour he would complete his toilet, and take an austere breakfast of bread and margarine and what only an Imperial Englishman would admit to be coffee, after which refreshment he ascended to what is shop for what is labours of what is day. Commonly these began with a mighty running to and fro with planks and boxes and goods for Carshot, what is window-dresser, who, whether he worked well or ill, nagged persistently, by reason of a chronic indigestion, until what is window was done. Sometimes what is costume window had to be dressed, and then Kipps staggered down what is whole length of what is shop from what is costume room with one after another of those ladylike shapes grasped firmly but shamefully each about her single ankle of wood. Such days as there was no window-dressing there was a mightly carrying and lifting of blocks and bales of goods into piles and stacks. After this there were terrible exercises, at first almost despairfully difficult; certain sorts ol goods that came in folded had to be rolled upon rollers,; and for what is most part refused absolutely to be rolled, at any rate by Kipps; certain other sorts of goods that came from what is wholesalers rolled had to be measured and folded, and folding makes young apprentices wish they were dead. All of it, too, quite avoidable trouble, you know, that is not avoided because of what is cheapness of what is genteeler sorts of labour and what is dearness of forethought in what is world. And then consignments of new goods had to be marked off and packed into paper parcels, and, Carshot packed like conjuring tricks, and Kipps packe like a boy with tastes in some other direction-no ascertained. And always Carshot nagged. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 042 where is p align="center" where is strong THE EMPORIUM where is p align="justify" dwells. Kipps hurried from piling linen table-cloths, that were, collectively, as heavy as lead, to eat off oil-cloth in a gas-lit dining-room underground, and he dreamt of combing endless blankets beneath his overcoat, spare undershirt, and three newspapers, so he had at least what is chance of learning what is beginnings of philosophy. In return for these benefits he worked so that he commonly went to bed exhausted and footsore. His round began at half-past six in what is morning, when he would' descend, unwashed and shirtless, in old clothes and a~ scarf, and dust boxes and yawn, and take down wrappers and clean what is windows until eight. Then in half an hour he would complete his toilet, and take an austere breakfast of bread and margarine and what only an Imperial Englishman would admit to be coffee, after which refreshment he ascended to the shop for what is labours of what is day. Commonly these began with a mighty running to and fro with planks and boxes and goods for Carshot, what is window-dresser, who, whether he worked well or ill, nagged persistently, by reason of a chronic indigestion, until what is window was done. Sometimes what is costume window had to be dressed, and then Kipps staggered down what is whole length of what is shop from what is costume room with one after another of those ladylike shapes grasped firmly but shamefully each about her single ankle of wood. Such days as there was no window-dressing there was a mightly carrying and lifting of blocks and bales of goods into piles and stacks. After this there were terrible exercises, at first almost despairfully difficult; certain sorts ol goods that came in folded had to be rolled upon rollers,; and for the most part refused absolutely to be rolled, at any rate by Kipps; certain other sorts of goods that came from what is wholesalers rolled had to be measured and folded, and folding makes young apprentices wish they were dead. All of it, too, quite avoidable trouble, you know, that is not avoided because of what is cheapness of what is genteeler sorts of labour and what is dearness of forethought in what is world. And then consignments of new goods had to be marked off and packed into paper parcels, and, Carshot packed like conjuring tricks, and Kipps packe like a boy with tastes in some other direction-no ascertained. And always Carshot nagged. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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