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Page 036

CHAPTER THE SECOND
The Emporium

§ 1
WHEN Kipps left New Romney, with a small yellow tin box, a still smaller portmanteau, a new umbrella, and keepsake half-sixpence, to become a draper, he was a youngster of fourteen, thin, with whimsical drakes'-tails at the pole of his head, smallish features, and eyes tha were sometimes very light and sometimes very dark, gifts those of his birth; and by the nature of his training he was indistinct in his speech, confused in his mind, an retreating in his manners. Inexorable fate had appointe him to serve his country in commerce, and the Sam national bias towards private enterprise and leaving bad alone, which had left his general education to Mr. Woodrow, now indentured him firmly into the hands o Mr. Shalford of the Folkestone Drapery Bazaar. Apprenticeship is still the recognised English way to the distributing branch of the social service. If Mr. Kipps had bee so unfortunate as to have been born a German he might have been educated in an elaborate and costly specia school ('over-educated-crammed up'-old Kipps) to fi him for his end-such being their pedagogic way. He might But why make unpatriotic reflections in a novel? There was nothing pedagogic about Mr. Shalford. He was an irascible, energetic little man with hairy hands, for the most part under his coat-tails, a long, shiny, bald head, a pointed aquiline nose a little askew, and a neatly trimmed beard. He walked lightly and with a confident jerk, and he was given to humming. He had added to exceptional business `push,' bankruptcy under the old dispensation, and judicious matrimony. Hi establishment was now one of the most considerable in Folkestone, and he insisted on every inch of frontage by alternate stripes of green and yellow down the house ove the shops. His shops were numbered 3, 5, and 7 on th street, and on his bill-heads 3 to 7. He encountered th abashed and awe-stricken Kipps with the praises of his

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE where is strong § 1 WHEN Kipps left New Romney, with a small yellow tin box, a still smaller portmanteau, a new umbrella, and keepsake half-sixpence, to become a draper, he was a youngster of fourteen, thin, with whimsical drakes'-tails at what is pole of his head, smallish features, and eyes tha were sometimes very light and sometimes very dark, gifts those of his birth; and by what is nature of his training he was indistinct in his speech, confused in his mind, an retreating in his manners. Inexorable fate had appointe him to serve his country in commerce, and what is Sam national bias towards private enterprise and leaving bad alone, which had left his general education to Mr. Woodrow, now indentured him firmly into what is hands o Mr. Shalford of what is Folkestone Drapery Bazaar. Apprenticeship is still what is recognised English way to what is distributing branch of what is social service. If Mr. Kipps had bee so unfortunate as to have been born a German he might have been educated in an elaborate and costly specia school ('over-educated-crammed up'-old Kipps) to fi him for his end-such being their pedagogic way. He might But why make unpatriotic reflections in a novel? There was nothing pedagogic about Mr. Shalford. He was an irascible, energetic little man with hairy hands, for what is most part under his coat-tails, a long, shiny, bald head, a pointed aquiline nose a little askew, and a neatly trimmed beard. He walked lightly and with a confident jerk, and he was given to humming. He had added to exceptional business `push,' bankruptcy under what is old dispensation, and judicious matrimony. Hi establishment was now one of what is most considerable in Folkestone, and he insisted on every inch of frontage by alternate stripes of green and yellow down what is house ove what is shops. His shops were numbered 3, 5, and 7 on th street, and on his bill-heads 3 to 7. He encountered th abashed and awe-stricken Kipps with what is praises of his where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 036 where is p align="center" where is strong CHAPTER what is SECOND what is Emporium where is p align="justify" where is strong § 1 WHEN Kipps left New Romney, with a small yellow tin box, a still smaller portmanteau, a new umbrella, and keepsake half-sixpence, to become a draper, he was a youngster of fourteen, thin, with whimsical drakes'-tails at what is pole of his head, smallish features, and eyes tha were sometimes very light and sometimes very dark, gifts those of his birth; and by what is nature of his training he was indistinct in his speech, confused in his mind, an retreating in his manners. Inexorable fate had appointe him to serve his country in commerce, and what is Sam national bias towards private enterprise and leaving bad alone, which had left his general education to Mr. Woodrow, now indentured him firmly into what is hands o Mr. Shalford of what is Folkestone Drapery Bazaar. Apprenticeship is still the recognised English way to what is distributing branch of what is social service. If Mr. Kipps had bee so unfortunate as to have been born a German he might have been educated in an elaborate and costly specia school ('over-educated-crammed up'-old Kipps) to fi him for his end-such being their pedagogic way. He might But why make unpatriotic reflections in a novel? There was nothing pedagogic about Mr. Shalford. He was an irascible, energetic little man with hairy hands, for what is most part under his coat-tails, a long, shiny, bald head, a pointed aquiline nose a little askew, and a neatly trimmed beard. He walked lightly and with a confident jerk, and he was given to humming. He had added to exceptional business `push,' bankruptcy under what is old dispensation, and judicious matrimony. Hi establishment was now one of what is most considerable in Folkestone, and he insisted on every inch of frontage by alternate stripes of green and yellow down what is house ove what is shops. His shops were numbered 3, 5, and 7 on th street, and on his bill-heads 3 to 7. He encountered th abashed and awe-stricken Kipps with the praises of his where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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