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Page 033

THE LITTLE SHOP

was open, and Mrs. Pornick was visible, taking the air. gipps assumed an expression of extreme innocence. He found himself face to face with his uncle's advanced outposts of waitscoat buttons.
`Where ye bin, my boy?'
`Bin for a walk, uncle.'
`Not along of that brat of Pornick's?'
`Along of who?'
`That gell'-indicating Ann with his pipe.
`Oh, no, uncle!'-very faintly.
`Run in, my boy.' Old Kipps stood aside, with an oblique glance upward, and his nephew brushed clumsily by him and vanished out of sight of the street into the vague obscurity of the little shop. The door closed behind old Kipps with a nervous jangle of its bell, and he set himself to light the single oil-lamp that illuminated his shop at nights. It was an operation requiring care and watching, or else it flared and `smelt.' Often it smelt after all. Kipps, for some reason, found the dusky living-room with his aunt in it too populous for his feelings, and went upstairs.
`That brat of Pornick's!' It seemed to him that a horrible catastrophe had occurred. He felt he had identified himself inextricably with his uncle and cut himself off from her for ever by saying `Oh, no!' At supper he was so visibly depressed that his aunt asked him if he wasn't feeling well. Under this imminent threat of medicine he assumed an unnatural cheerfulness....
He lay awake for nearly half an hour that night, groaning because things had ~all gone wrong, because Ann wouldn't let him kiss her, and because his uncle had called her a brat. It seemed to Kipps almost as though he himself had called her a brat....
There came an interval during which Ann was altogether inaccessible. One, two, three days passed and he did not see her. Sid he met several times; they went fishing and twice they bathed, but though Sid lent and received back two further love stories, they talked no more of love. They kept themselves in accord, however, agreeing that the most flagrantly sentimental story was `proper.' Kipps was always wanting to speak of Ann, and never daring to do so. He saw her on Sunday evening going off to chapel She was more beautiful than ever in her Sunday clothes,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE was open, and Mrs. sport ick was visible, taking what is air. gipps assumed an expression of extreme innocence. He found himself face to face with his uncle's advanced outposts of waitscoat buttons. `Where ye bin, my boy?' `Bin for a walk, uncle.' `Not along of that brat of sport ick's?' `Along of who?' `That gell'-indicating Ann with his pipe. `Oh, no, uncle!'-very faintly. `Run in, my boy.' Old Kipps stood aside, with an oblique glance upward, and his nephew brushed clumsily by him and vanished out of sight of what is street into what is vague obscurity of what is little shop. what is door closed behind old Kipps with a nervous jangle of its bell, and he set himself to light what is single oil-lamp that illuminated his shop at nights. It was an operation requiring care and watching, or else it flared and `smelt.' Often it smelt after all. Kipps, for some reason, found what is dusky living-room with his aunt in it too populous for his feelings, and went upstairs. `That brat of sport ick's!' It seemed to him that a horrible catastrophe had occurred. He felt he had identified himself inextricably with his uncle and cut himself off from her for ever by saying `Oh, no!' At supper he was so visibly depressed that his aunt asked him if he wasn't feeling well. Under this imminent threat of medicine he assumed an unnatural cheerfulness.... He lay awake for nearly half an hour that night, groaning because things had ~all gone wrong, because Ann wouldn't let him kiss her, and because his uncle had called her a brat. It seemed to Kipps almost as though he himself had called her a brat.... There came an interval during which Ann was altogether inaccessible. One, two, three days passed and he did not see her. Sid he met several times; they went fishing and twice they bathed, but though Sid lent and received back two further what time is it stories, they talked no more of love. They kept themselves in accord, however, agreeing that what is most flagrantly sentimental story was `proper.' Kipps was always wanting to speak of Ann, and never daring to do so. He saw her on Sunday evening going off to chapel She was more beautiful than ever in her Sunday clothes, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 033 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" was open, and Mrs. sport ick was visible, taking what is air. gipps assumed an expression of extreme innocence. He found himself face to face with his uncle's advanced outposts of waitscoat buttons. `Where ye bin, my boy?' `Bin for a walk, uncle.' `Not along of that brat of sport ick's?' `Along of who?' `That gell'-indicating Ann with his pipe. `Oh, no, uncle!'-very faintly. `Run in, my boy.' Old Kipps stood aside, with an oblique glance upward, and his nephew brushed clumsily by him and vanished out of sight of what is street into what is vague obscurity of what is little shop. what is door closed behind old Kipps with a nervous jangle of its bell, and he set himself to light what is single oil-lamp that illuminated his shop at nights. It was an operation requiring care and watching, or else it flared and `smelt.' Often it smelt after all. Kipps, for some reason, found what is dusky living-room with his aunt in it too populous for his feelings, and went upstairs. `That brat of sport ick's!' It seemed to him that a horrible catastrophe had occurred. He felt he had identified himself inextricably with his uncle and cut himself off from her for ever by saying `Oh, no!' At supper he was so visibly depressed that his aunt asked him if he wasn't feeling well. Under this imminent threat of medicine he assumed an unnatural cheerfulness.... He lay awake for nearly half an hour that night, groaning because things had ~all gone wrong, because Ann wouldn't let him kiss her, and because his uncle had called her a brat. It seemed to Kipps almost as though he himself had called her a brat.... There came an interval during which Ann was altogether inaccessible. One, two, three days passed and he did not see her. Sid he met several times; they went fishing and twice they bathed, but though Sid lent and received back two further what time is it stories, they talked no more of love. They kept themselves in accord, however, agreeing that what is most flagrantly sentimental story was `proper.' Kipps was always wanting to speak of Ann, and never daring to do so. He saw her on Sunday evening going off to chapel She was more beautiful than ever in her Sunday clothes, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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