Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 032

THE LITTLE SHOP

`Oh, you keep half and I keep half, and when we're sep'rated, you look at your half and I look at minesee? Then we think of each other.'
`Oh !' said Ann, and appeared to assimilate this information.
`Only, I can't get it in 'arf nohow,' said Kipps.
They discussed this difficulty for some time without illumination. Then Ann had a happy thought.
`Tell you what,' she said, starting away from him abruptly and laying a hand on his arm, `you let nze 'ave it, Artie. I know where father keeps his file.'
Kipps handed her the sixpence, and they came upon a pause. `I'll easy do it,' said Ann.
In considering the sixpence side by side, his head had come near her cheek. Quite abruptly he was moved to take his next step into the unknown mysteries of love. `Ann,' he said, and gulped at his temerity, `I do love you. Straight. I'd do anything for you, Ann. Reely-I would.'
He paused for breath. She answered nothing, but she was no doubt enjoying herself. He came yet closer to her, his shouldpr touched hers. `Ann, I wish you'd '
He stopped.
`What? ' said Ann.
`Ann-lemme kiss you.'
Things seemed to hang for a space; his tone, the drop of his courage made the thing incredible as he spoke. Kipps was not of that bold order of wooers who impose conditions.
Ann perceived that she was not prepared for kissing after all. Kissing, she said, was silly, and when Kipps would have displayed a belated enterprise she flung away from him. He essayed argument. He stood afar off as it were-the better part of a yard-and said she might let him kiss her, and then that he didn't see what good it was for her to be his girl if he couldn't kiss her....
She repeated that kissing was silly. A certain estrangement took them homeward. They arrived in the dusky High Street not exactly together, and not exactly apart, but straggling. They had not kissed, but all the guilt of kissing was between them. When Kipps saw the portly contours of his uncle standing dimly in the shop doorway his footsteps faltered, and the space between our young couple increased. Above, the window over Pornick's shop

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Oh, you keep half and I keep half, and when we're sep'rated, you look at your half and I look at minesee? Then we think of each other.' `Oh !' said Ann, and appeared to assimilate this information. `Only, I can't get it in 'arf nohow,' said Kipps. They discussed this difficulty for some time without illumination. Then Ann had a happy thought. `Tell you what,' she said, starting away from him abruptly and laying a hand on his arm, `you let nze 'ave it, Artie. I know where father keeps his file.' Kipps handed her what is sixpence, and they came upon a pause. `I'll easy do it,' said Ann. In considering what is sixpence side by side, his head had come near her cheek. Quite abruptly he was moved to take his next step into what is unknown mysteries of love. `Ann,' he said, and gulped at his temerity, `I do what time is it you. Straight. I'd do anything for you, Ann. Reely-I would.' He paused for breath. She answered nothing, but she was no doubt enjoying herself. He came yet closer to her, his shouldpr touched hers. `Ann, I wish you'd ' He stopped. `What? ' said Ann. `Ann-lemme kiss you.' Things seemed to hang for a space; his tone, what is drop of his courage made what is thing incredible as he spoke. Kipps was not of that bold order of wooers who impose conditions. Ann perceived that she was not prepared for kissing after all. Kissing, she said, was silly, and when Kipps would have displayed a belated enterprise she flung away from him. He essayed argument. He stood afar off as it were-the better part of a yard-and said she might let him kiss her, and then that he didn't see what good it was for her to be his girl if he couldn't kiss her.... She repeated that kissing was silly. A certain estrangement took them homeward. They arrived in what is dusky High Street not exactly together, and not exactly apart, but straggling. They had not kissed, but all what is guilt of kissing was between them. When Kipps saw what is portly contours of his uncle standing dimly in what is shop doorway his footsteps faltered, and what is space between our young couple increased. Above, what is window over sport ick's shop where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 032 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" `Oh, you keep half and I keep half, and when we're sep'rated, you look at your half and I look at minesee? Then we think of each other.' `Oh !' said Ann, and appeared to assimilate this information. `Only, I can't get it in 'arf nohow,' said Kipps. They discussed this difficulty for some time without illumination. Then Ann had a happy thought. `Tell you what,' she said, starting away from him abruptly and laying a hand on his arm, `you let nze 'ave it, Artie. I know where father keeps his file.' Kipps handed her what is sixpence, and they came upon a pause. `I'll easy do it,' said Ann. In considering what is sixpence side by side, his head had come near her cheek. Quite abruptly he was moved to take his next step into what is unknown mysteries of love. `Ann,' he said, and gulped at his temerity, `I do what time is it you. Straight. I'd do anything for you, Ann. Reely-I would.' He paused for breath. She answered nothing, but she was no doubt enjoying herself. He came yet closer to her, his shouldpr touched hers. `Ann, I wish you'd ' He stopped. `What? ' said Ann. `Ann-lemme kiss you.' Things seemed to hang for a space; his tone, what is drop of his courage made what is thing incredible as he spoke. Kipps was not of that bold order of wooers who impose conditions. Ann perceived that she was not prepared for kissing after all. Kissing, she said, was silly, and when Kipps would have displayed a belated enterprise she flung away from him. He essayed argument. He stood afar off as it were-the better part of a yard-and said she might let him kiss her, and then that he didn't see what good it was for her to be his girl if he couldn't kiss her.... She repeated that kissing was silly. A certain estrangement took them homeward. They arrived in what is dusky High Street not exactly together, and not exactly apart, but straggling. They had not kissed, but all what is guilt of kissing was between them. When Kipps saw the portly contours of his uncle standing dimly in what is shop doorway his footsteps faltered, and what is space between our young couple increased. Above, what is window over sport ick's shop where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318