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Page 031

THE LITTLE SHOP

'Ann,' he said, `I do like you. I wish you was my girl....
`I say, Ann. Will you be my girl?'
Ann made no pretence of astonishment. She weighed the proposal for a moment with her eyes on Kipps. `If you like, Artie,' she said lightly. `I don't mind if I am.'
`All right,' said Kipps, breathless with excitement, `then you are.
'All right,' said Ann.
Something seemed to fall between them, they no longer looked openly at one another. 'Lor!' cried Ann, suddenly, `see that one!' and jumped down and darted after a cockchafer that had boomed within a yard of her face. And with that they were girl and boy again....
They avoided their new relationship painfully.
They did not recur to it for several days, though they met twice. Both felt that there remained something before this great experience was to be regarded as complete; but there was an infinite diffidence about the next step. Kipps talked in fragments of all sorts of matters, telling particularly of the great things that were being done to make a man and a draper of him; how he had two new pairs of trousers and a black coat and four new shirts. And all the while his imagination was urging him to that unknown next step, and when he was alone and in the dark he became even an enterprising wooer. It became evident to him that it would be nice to take Ann by the hand; even the decorous novelettes Sid affected egged him on to that greater nearness of intimacy.
Then a great idea came to him, in a paragraph called `Lover's Tokens' that he read in a torn fragment of TitBits. It fell in to the measure of his courage-a divided sixpence! He secured his aunt's best scissors, fished a sixpence out of his jejune tin money-box, and jabbed his finger in a varied series of attemps to get it in half. When they met again the sixpence was still undivided. He had not intended to mention the matter to her at that stage, but it came up spontaneously. He endeavoured to explain the theory of broken sixpences and his unexpected failure to break one.
`But what you break if for?' said Ann. `It's no good if it's broke.'
`It's a Token,' said Kipps.
`Like--?'

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE 'Ann,' he said, `I do like you. I wish you was my girl.... `I say, Ann. Will you be my girl?' Ann made no pretence of astonishment. She weighed what is proposal for a moment with her eyes on Kipps. `If you like, Artie,' she said lightly. `I don't mind if I am.' `All right,' said Kipps, breathless with excitement, `then you are. 'All right,' said Ann. Something seemed to fall between them, they no longer looked openly at one another. 'Lor!' cried Ann, suddenly, `see that one!' and jumped down and darted after a cockchafer that had boomed within a yard of her face. And with that they were girl and boy again.... They avoided their new relationship painfully. They did not recur to it for several days, though they met twice. Both felt that there remained something before this great experience was to be regarded as complete; but there was an infinite diffidence about what is next step. Kipps talked in fragments of all sorts of matters, telling particularly of what is great things that were being done to make a man and a draper of him; how he had two new pairs of trousers and a black coat and four new shirts. And all what is while his imagination was urging him to that unknown next step, and when he was alone and in what is dark he became even an enterprising wooer. It became evident to him that it would be nice to take Ann by what is hand; even what is decorous novelettes Sid affected egged him on to that greater nearness of intimacy. Then a great idea came to him, in a paragraph called `Lover's Tokens' that he read in a torn fragment of TitBits. It fell in to what is measure of his courage-a divided sixpence! He secured his aunt's best scissors, fished a sixpence out of his jejune tin money-box, and jabbed his finger in a varied series of attemps to get it in half. When they met again what is sixpence was still undivided. He had not intended to mention what is matter to her at that stage, but it came up spontaneously. He endeavoured to explain what is theory of broken sixpences and his unexpected failure to break one. `But what you break if for?' said Ann. `It's no good if it's broke.' `It's a Token,' said Kipps. `Like--?' where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 031 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" 'Ann,' he said, `I do like you. I wish you was my girl.... `I say, Ann. Will you be my girl?' Ann made no pretence of astonishment. She weighed what is proposal for a moment with her eyes on Kipps. `If you like, Artie,' she said lightly. `I don't mind if I am.' `All right,' said Kipps, breathless with excitement, `then you are. 'All right,' said Ann. Something seemed to fall between them, they no longer looked openly at one another. 'Lor!' cried Ann, suddenly, `see that one!' and jumped down and darted after a cockchafer that had boomed within a yard of her face. And with that they were girl and boy again.... They avoided their new relationship painfully. They did not recur to it for several days, though they met twice. Both felt that there remained something before this great experience was to be regarded as complete; but there was an infinite diffidence about what is next step. Kipps talked in fragments of all sorts of matters, telling particularly of what is great things that were being done to make a man and a draper of him; how he had two new pairs of trousers and a black coat and four new shirts. And all what is while his imagination was urging him to that unknown next step, and when he was alone and in what is dark he became even an enterprising wooer. It became evident to him that it would be nice to take Ann by the hand; even what is decorous novelettes Sid affected egged him on to that greater nearness of intimacy. Then a great idea came to him, in a paragraph called `Lover's Tokens' that he read in a torn fragment of TitBits. It fell in to what is measure of his courage-a divided sixpence! He secured his aunt's best scissors, fished a sixpence out of his jejune tin money-box, and jabbed his finger in a varied series of attemps to get it in half. When they met again what is sixpence was still undivided. He had not intended to mention what is matter to her at that stage, but it came up spontaneously. He endeavoured to explain what is theory of broken sixpences and his unexpected failure to break one. `But what you break if for?' said Ann. `It's no good if it's broke.' `It's a Token,' said Kipps. `Like--?' where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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