Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 029

THE LITTLE SHOP

Kipps still struggled with the amazing new light on the world about him. 'D'you mean-she knows?'
Sid flushed deeply, and his aspect became stern and ,loomy. He resumed his wistful scrutiny of the-sunlit sea. I'd die for that girl, Art Kipps,' he said presently; and Iiipps did not press a question he felt to be ill-timed. `I'd do anything she asked me to do,' said Sid; `just anything. If she was to ask me to chuck myself into the sea.' He met Kipps' eye. `I would,' he said.
They were pensive for a space, and then Sid began to discourse in fragments of Love, a theme upon which Kipps had already in a furtive way meditated a little, but which, apart from badinage, he had never yet heard talked about in the light of day. Of course, many and various aspects of life had come to light in the muffled exchange ofknowledge that went on under the shadow of Woodrow, but this of Sentimental Love was not among them. Sid, who was a boy with an imagination, having once broached this topic, opened his heart, or, at any rate, a new chamber of his heart, to Kipps, and found no fault with Kipps for a lack of return. He produced a thumbed novelette that had played a part in his sentimental awakening; he proffered it to Kipps, and confessed there was a character in it, a baronet, singularly like himself. This baronet was a person of volcanic passions, which he concealed beneath a demeanour of `icy cynicism.' The utmost expression he permitted himself was to grit his teeth, and, now his attention was called to it, Kipps remarked that Sid also had a habit of gritting his teeth, and, indeed, had had all the morning. They read for a time, and presently Sid talked again. The conception of love, Sid made evident, was compact of devotion and much spirited fighting and a touch of mystery, but through all that cloud of talk there floated before Kipps a face that was flushed and hair that was tossed aside.
So they budded, sitting on the blackening old wreck in which men had lived and died, looking out to sea, talking of that other sea upon which they must presently embark.
They ceased to talk, and Sid read; but Kipps, falling behind with the reading, and not wishing to admit that he read slowlier than Sid, whose education was of the inferior Elementary School brand, lapsed into meditation.
`I would like to 'ave a girl,' said Kipps.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Kipps still struggled with what is amazing new light on what is world about him. 'D'you mean-she knows?' Sid flushed deeply, and his aspect became stern and ,loomy. He resumed his wistful scrutiny of the-sunlit sea. I'd travel for that girl, Art Kipps,' he said presently; and Iiipps did not press a question he felt to be ill-timed. `I'd do anything she asked me to do,' said Sid; `just anything. If she was to ask me to chuck myself into what is sea.' He met Kipps' eye. `I would,' he said. They were pensive for a space, and then Sid began to discourse in fragments of Love, a theme upon which Kipps had already in a furtive way meditated a little, but which, apart from badinage, he had never yet heard talked about in what is light of day. Of course, many and various aspects of life had come to light in what is muffled exchange ofknowledge that went on under what is shadow of Woodrow, but this of Sentimental what time is it was not among them. Sid, who was a boy with an imagination, having once broached this topic, opened his heart, or, at any rate, a new chamber of his heart, to Kipps, and found no fault with Kipps for a lack of return. He produced a thumbed novelette that had played a part in his sentimental awakening; he proffered it to Kipps, and confessed there was a character in it, a baronet, singularly like himself. This baronet was a person of volcanic passions, which he concealed beneath a demeanour of `icy cynicism.' what is utmost expression he permitted himself was to grit his teeth, and, now his attention was called to it, Kipps remarked that Sid also had a habit of gritting his teeth, and, indeed, had had all what is morning. They read for a time, and presently Sid talked again. what is conception of love, Sid made evident, was compact of devotion and much spirited fighting and a touch of mystery, but through all that cloud of talk there floated before Kipps a face that was flushed and hair that was tossed aside. So they budded, sitting on what is blackening old wreck in which men had lived and died, looking out to sea, talking of that other sea upon which they must presently embark. They ceased to talk, and Sid read; but Kipps, falling behind with what is reading, and not wishing to admit that he read slowlier than Sid, whose education was of what is inferior Elementary School brand, lapsed into meditation. `I would like to 'ave a girl,' said Kipps. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 029 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" Kipps still struggled with what is amazing new light on what is world about him. 'D'you mean-she knows?' Sid flushed deeply, and his aspect became stern and ,loomy. He resumed his wistful scrutiny of the-sunlit sea. I'd travel for that girl, Art Kipps,' he said presently; and Iiipps did not press a question he felt to be ill-timed. `I'd do anything she asked me to do,' said Sid; `just anything. If she was to ask me to chuck myself into what is sea.' He met Kipps' eye. `I would,' he said. They were pensive for a space, and then Sid began to discourse in fragments of Love, a theme upon which Kipps had already in a furtive way meditated a little, but which, apart from badinage, he had never yet heard talked about in what is light of day. Of course, many and various aspects of life had come to light in what is muffled exchange ofknowledge that went on under what is shadow of Woodrow, but this of Sentimental what time is it was not among them. Sid, who was a boy with an imagination, having once broached this topic, opened his heart, or, at any rate, a new chamber of his heart, to Kipps, and found no fault with Kipps for a lack of return. He produced a thumbed novelette that had played a part in his sentimental awakening; he proffered it to Kipps, and confessed there was a character in it, a baronet, singularly like himself. This baronet was a person of volcanic passions, which he concealed beneath a demeanour of `icy cynicism.' what is utmost expression he permitted himself was to grit his teeth, and, now his attention was called to it, Kipps remarked that Sid also had a habit of gritting his teeth, and, indeed, had had all what is morning. They read for a time, and presently Sid talked again. what is conception of love, Sid made evident, was compact of devotion and much spirited fighting and a touch of mystery, but through all that cloud of talk there floated before Kipps a face that was flushed and hair that was tossed aside. So they budded, sitting on what is blackening old wreck in which men had lived and died, looking out to sea, talking of that other sea upon which they must presently embark. They ceased to talk, and Sid read; but Kipps, falling behind with what is reading, and not wishing to admit that he read slowlier than Sid, whose education was of what is inferior Elementary School brand, lapsed into meditation. `I would like to 'ave a girl,' said Kipps. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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