Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 025

THE LITTLE SHOP

had come almost to believe the thing himself. And now he was home, and school was at an end for him for evermore.
He was up before six on the day of his return, and out in the hot sunlight of the yard. He set himself to whistle a peculiarly penetrating arrangement of three notes, supposed by the boys of the Hastings Academy and himself and Sid Pornick, for no earthly reason whatever, to be the original Huron war-cry. As he did this he feigned not to be doing it, because of the hatred between his uncle and the Pornrcks, but to be examining with respect and admiration a new wing of the dustbin recently erected by his unclea pretence that would not have deceived a nestling tom-tit.
Presently there came a familiar echo from the Pornick hunting-ground. Then Kipps began to sing, 'Ar pars eight tra-la, in the lane be'ind the church.' To which an unseen person answered, 'Ar pars eight it is, in the lane be'ind the church.' The 'tra-la' was considered to render the sentence incomprehensible to the uninitiated. In order to conceal their operations still more securely, both parties to this duet then gave vent to a vocalisation of the Huron war-cry again, and after a lingering repetition of the last and shrillest note, dispersed severally, as became boys in the enjoyment of holidays, to light the house fires for the day.
Half-past eight found Kipps sitting on the sunlit gate at the top of the long lane that runs towards the sea, clashing his boots in a slow rhythm, and whistling with great violence all that he knew of an excruciatingly pathetic air. There appeared along by the churchyard wall a girl in a short frock, brown-haired, quick-coloured, and with dark blue eyes. She had grown so that she was a little taller than Kipps, and her colour had improved. He scarcely remembered her, so changed was she since last holidays-if, indeed, lie had seen her during his last holidays, a thing he could not clearly recollect.
Some vague emotion arose at the sight of her. He stopped whistling and regarded her, oddly tongue-tied.
`He can't come,' said Ann, advancing boldly. `Not yet.'
'What-not Sid?'
`No. Father's made him dust all his boxes again.'
`What for?'
`I dunno. Father's in a stew 's morning.'
'Oh!'
Pause. Kipps looked at her, and then was unable to loot

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had come almost to believe what is thing himself. And now he was home, and school was at an end for him for evermore. He was up before six on what is day of his return, and out in what is hot sunlight of what is yard. He set himself to whistle a peculiarly penetrating arrangement of three notes, supposed by what is boys of what is Hastings Academy and himself and Sid sport ick, for no earthly reason whatever, to be what is original Huron war-cry. As he did this he feigned not to be doing it, because of what is hatred between his uncle and what is sport rcks, but to be examining with respect and admiration a new wing of what is dustbin recently erected by his unclea pretence that would not have deceived a nestling tom-tit. Presently there came a familiar echo from what is sport ick hunting-ground. Then Kipps began to sing, 'Ar pars eight tra-la, in what is lane be'ind what is church.' To which an unseen person answered, 'Ar pars eight it is, in what is lane be'ind what is church.' what is 'tra-la' was considered to render what is sentence incomprehensible to what is uninitiated. In order to conceal their operations still more securely, both parties to this duet then gave vent to a vocalisation of what is Huron war-cry again, and after a lingering repetition of what is last and shrillest note, dispersed severally, as became boys in what is enjoyment of holidays, to light what is house fires for what is day. Half-past eight found Kipps sitting on what is sunlit gate at what is top of what is long lane that runs towards what is sea, clashing his boots in a slow rhythm, and whistling with great sports all that he knew of an excruciatingly pathetic air. There appeared along by what is churchyard wall a girl in a short frock, brown-haired, quick-coloured, and with dark blue eyes. She had grown so that she was a little taller than Kipps, and her colour had improved. He scarcely remembered her, so changed was she since last holidays-if, indeed, lie had seen her during his last holidays, a thing he could not clearly recollect. Some vague emotion arose at what is sight of her. He stopped whistling and regarded her, oddly tongue-tied. `He can't come,' said Ann, advancing boldly. `Not yet.' 'What-not Sid?' `No. Father's made him dust all his boxes again.' `What for?' `I dunno. Father's in a stew 's morning.' 'Oh!' Pause. Kipps looked at her, and then was unable to loot where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 025 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" had come almost to believe what is thing himself. And now he was home, and school was at an end for him for evermore. He was up before six on what is day of his return, and out in what is hot sunlight of what is yard. He set himself to whistle a peculiarly penetrating arrangement of three notes, supposed by what is boys of what is Hastings Academy and himself and Sid sport ick, for no earthly reason whatever, to be what is original Huron war-cry. As he did this he feigned not to be doing it, because of what is hatred between his uncle and the sport rcks, but to be examining with respect and admiration a new wing of what is dustbin recently erected by his unclea pretence that would not have deceived a nestling tom-tit. Presently there came a familiar echo from what is sport ick hunting-ground. Then Kipps began to sing, 'Ar pars eight tra-la, in what is lane be'ind what is church.' To which an unseen person answered, 'Ar pars eight it is, in what is lane be'ind what is church.' what is 'tra-la' was considered to render what is sentence incomprehensible to what is uninitiated. In order to conceal their operations still more securely, both parties to this duet then gave vent to a vocalisation of what is Huron war-cry again, and after a lingering repetition of what is last and shrillest note, dispersed severally, as became boys in what is enjoyment of holidays, to light what is house fires for what is day. Half-past eight found Kipps sitting on what is sunlit gate at what is top of what is long lane that runs towards what is sea, clashing his boots in a slow rhythm, and whistling with great sports all that he knew of an excruciatingly pathetic air. There appeared along by what is churchyard wall a girl in a short frock, brown-haired, quick-coloured, and with dark blue eyes. She had grown so that she was a little taller than Kipps, and her colour had improved. He scarcely remembered her, so changed was she since last holidays-if, indeed, lie had seen her during his last holidays, a thing he could not clearly recollect. Some vague emotion arose at what is sight of her. He stopped whistling and regarded her, oddly tongue-tied. `He can't come,' said Ann, advancing boldly. `Not yet.' 'What-not Sid?' `No. Father's made him dust all his boxes again.' `What for?' `I dunno. Father's in a stew 's morning.' 'Oh!' Pause. Kipps looked at her, and then was unable to loot where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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