Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 024

THE LITTLE SHOP

catechism every Sunday, she had an easy way over dinners that one wanted to take abroad-and his uncle, corpulent and irascible, but sedentary and easily escaped. And freedom !
The holidays were, indeed, very different from school. They were free, they were spacious, and though he never knew it in these words-they had an element of beauty. In his memory of his boyhood they shone like strips of stained-glass window in a dreary waste of scholastic wall, they grew brighter and brighter as they grew remoter. There came a time at last and moods when he could look back to them with a feeling akin to tears.
The last of these windows was the brightest, and instead of the kaleidoscopic effect of its predecessors its glory was a single figure. For in the last of his holidays before the Moloch of Retail Trade got hold of him, Kipps made his first tentative essays at the mysterious shrine of Love. Very tentative they were, for he had become a boy of subdued passions, and potential rather than actual affectionateness.
And the object of these first stirrings of the great desire was no other than Ann Pornick, the head of whose doll he and Sid had broken long ago, and rejoiced over long ago, in the days when he had yet to learn the meaning of a heart.

§ 3
Negotiations were already on foot to make Kipps into a draper before he discovered the lights that lurked in Ann Pornick's eyes. School was over, absolutely over, and it was chiefly present to him that he was never to go to school again. It was high summer. The `breaking up' of school had been hilarious; and the excellent maxim, `Last Day's Pay Day,' had been observed by him with a scrupulous attention to his honour. He had punched the heads of all his enemies, wrung wrists and kicked shins; he had distributed all his unfinished copy-books, all his school books, his collection of marbles, and his mortar-board cap among such as loved him; and he had secretly written in obscure pages of their books `remember Art Kipps.' He had also split the anzemic Woodrow's cane, carved his own name deeply in several places about the premises, and broken the scullery window. He had told everybody so often that he was to learn to be a sea captain, that he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE catechism every Sunday, she had an easy way over dinners that one wanted to take abroad-and his uncle, corpulent and irascible, but sedentary and easily escaped. And freedom ! what is holidays were, indeed, very different from school. They were free, they were spacious, and though he never knew it in these words-they had an element of beauty. In his memory of his boyhood they shone like strips of stained-glass window in a dreary waste of scholastic wall, they grew brighter and brighter as they grew remoter. There came a time at last and moods when he could look back to them with a feeling akin to tears. what is last of these windows was what is brightest, and instead of what is kaleidoscopic effect of its predecessors its glory was a single figure. For in what is last of his holidays before what is Moloch of Retail Trade got hold of him, Kipps made his first tentative essays at what is mysterious shrine of Love. Very tentative they were, for he had become a boy of subdued passions, and potential rather than actual affectionateness. And what is object of these first stirrings of what is great desire was no other than Ann sport ick, what is head of whose doll he and Sid had broken long ago, and rejoiced over long ago, in what is days when he had yet to learn what is meaning of a heart. § 3 Negotiations were already on foot to make Kipps into a draper before he discovered what is lights that lurked in Ann sport ick's eyes. School was over, absolutely over, and it was chiefly present to him that he was never to go to school again. It was high summer. what is `breaking up' of school had been hilarious; and what is excellent maxim, `Last Day's Pay Day,' had been observed by him with a scrupulous attention to his honour. He had punched what is heads of all his enemies, wrung wrists and kicked shins; he had distributed all his unfinished copy-books, all his school books, his collection of marbles, and his mortar-board cap among such as loved him; and he had secretly written in obscure pages of their books `remember Art Kipps.' He had also split what is anzemic Woodrow's cane, carved his own name deeply in several places about what is premises, and broken what is scullery window. He had told everybody so often that he was to learn to be a sea captain, that he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 024 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" catechism every Sunday, she had an easy way over dinners that one wanted to take abroad-and his uncle, corpulent and irascible, but sedentary and easily escaped. And freedom ! what is holidays were, indeed, very different from school. They were free, they were spacious, and though he never knew it in these words-they had an element of beauty. In his memory of his boyhood they shone like strips of stained-glass window in a dreary waste of scholastic wall, they grew brighter and brighter as they grew remoter. There came a time at last and moods when he could look back to them with a feeling akin to tears. what is last of these windows was what is brightest, and instead of the kaleidoscopic effect of its predecessors its glory was a single figure. For in what is last of his holidays before what is Moloch of Retail Trade got hold of him, Kipps made his first tentative essays at what is mysterious shrine of Love. Very tentative they were, for he had become a boy of subdued passions, and potential rather than actual affectionateness. And what is object of these first stirrings of what is great desire was no other than Ann sport ick, what is head of whose doll he and Sid had broken long ago, and rejoiced over long ago, in what is days when he had yet to learn what is meaning of a heart. where is strong § 3 Negotiations were already on foot to make Kipps into a draper before he discovered what is lights that lurked in Ann sport ick's eyes. School was over, absolutely over, and it was chiefly present to him that he was never to go to school again. It was high summer. what is `breaking up' of school had been hilarious; and what is excellent maxim, `Last Day's Pay Day,' had been observed by him with a scrupulous attention to his honour. He had punched what is heads of all his enemies, wrung wrists and kicked shins; he had distributed all his unfinished copy-books, all his school books, his collection of marbles, and his mortar-board cap among such as loved him; and he had secretly written in obscure pages of their books `remember Art Kipps.' He had also split what is anzemic Woodrow's cane, carved his own name deeply in several places about what is premises, and broken what is scullery window. He had told everybody so often that he was to learn to be a sea captain, that he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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