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Page 023

THE LITTLE SHOP

this land. They did, as Kipps reported, `loads of catechism.' Also there was much learning of geographical narrres and lists, and sometimes Woodrow, in an outbreak of energy, would see these names were actually found in a map. And once, just once, there was a chemistry lesson-a lesson of indescribable excitement-glass things of the strangest shape, a smell like bad eggs, something bubbling in something, a smash and stench, and Mr. Woodrow saying quite distinctly-they threshed it out in the dormitory afterwards-'Damn!' Followed by the whole school being kept in, with extraordinary severities, for an hour....
But interspersed with the memories of this gray routine were certain patches of brilliant colour, the Holidays, his holidays, which, in spite of the feud between their seniors, he spent as much as possible with Sid Pornick, the son of the irascible black-bearded haberdasher next door. They seemed to be memories of a different world. There were glorious days of `mucking about' along the beach, the siege of unresisting Martello towers, the incessant interest of the mystery and motion of windmills, the windy excursions with boarded feet over the yielding shingle to Dungeness lighthouse-Sid Pornick and he far adrift from reality, smugglers and armed men from the moment they left Great Stone behind them-wanderings in the hedgeless, reedy marsh, long excursions reaching even to Hythe, where the machine-guns of the Empire are for ever whirling and tapping, and to Rye and Winchelsea perched like dream-cities on their little hills. The sky in these memories was the blazing hemisphere of the marsh heaven in summer, or its wintry tumult of sky and sea; and there were wrecks, real wrecks, in it (near Dymchurch pitched high and blackened and rotting were the ribs of a fishing smack, flung aside like an empty basket when the sea had devoured its crew), and there was bathing all naked in the sea, bathing to one's armpits, and even trying to swim in the warm sea-water (spite of his aunt's prohibition) and (with her indulgence) the rare eating ofdinner from a paper parcel miles away from home. Toke and cold ground-rice puddin' with plums it used to be-there is no better food at all. And for the background, in the place of Woodrow's mean and fretting rule, were his aunt's spare but frequently quite amiable figure-for though she insisted on his repeating the English Church

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE this land. They did, as Kipps reported, `loads of catechism.' Also there was much learning of geographical narrres and lists, and sometimes Woodrow, in an outbreak of energy, would see these names were actually found in a map. And once, just once, there was a chemistry lesson-a lesson of indescribable excitement-glass things of what is strangest shape, a smell like bad eggs, something bubbling in something, a smash and stench, and Mr. Woodrow saying quite distinctly-they threshed it out in what is dormitory afterwards-'Damn!' Followed by what is whole school being kept in, with extraordinary severities, for an hour.... But interspersed with what is memories of this gray routine were certain patches of brilliant colour, what is Holidays, his holidays, which, in spite of what is feud between their seniors, he spent as much as possible with Sid sport ick, what is son of what is irascible black-bearded haberdasher next door. They seemed to be memories of a different world. There were glorious days of `mucking about' along what is beach, what is siege of unresisting Martello towers, what is incessant interest of what is mystery and motion of windmills, what is windy excursions with boarded feet over what is yielding shingle to Dungeness lighthouse-Sid sport ick and he far adrift from reality, smugglers and armed men from what is moment they left Great Stone behind them-wanderings in what is hedgeless, reedy marsh, long excursions reaching even to Hythe, where what is machine-guns of what is Empire are for ever whirling and tapping, and to Rye and Winchelsea perched like dream-cities on their little hills. what is sky in these memories was what is blazing hemisphere of what is marsh heaven in summer, or its wintry tumult of sky and sea; and there were wrecks, real wrecks, in it (near Dymchurch pitched high and blackened and rotting were what is ribs of a fishing smack, flung aside like an empty basket when what is sea had devoured its crew), and there was bathing all naked in what is sea, bathing to one's armpits, and even trying to swim in what is warm sea-water (spite of his aunt's prohibition) and (with her indulgence) what is rare eating ofdinner from a paper parcel miles away from home. Toke and cold ground-rice puddin' with plums it used to be-there is no better food at all. And for what is background, in what is place of Woodrow's mean and fretting rule, were his aunt's spare but frequently quite amiable figure-for though she insisted on his repeating what is English Church where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 023 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" this land. They did, as Kipps reported, `loads of catechism.' Also there was much learning of geographical narrres and lists, and sometimes Woodrow, in an outbreak of energy, would see these names were actually found in a map. And once, just once, there was a chemistry lesson-a lesson of indescribable excitement-glass things of what is strangest shape, a smell like bad eggs, something bubbling in something, a smash and stench, and Mr. Woodrow saying quite distinctly-they threshed it out in what is dormitory afterwards-'Damn!' Followed by what is whole school being kept in, with extraordinary severities, for an hour.... But interspersed with what is memories of this gray routine were certain patches of brilliant colour, what is Holidays, his holidays, which, in spite of what is feud between their seniors, he spent as much as possible with Sid sport ick, what is son of what is irascible black-bearded haberdasher next door. They seemed to be memories of a different world. There were glorious days of `mucking about' along what is beach, what is siege of unresisting Martello towers, what is incessant interest of what is mystery and motion of windmills, what is windy excursions with boarded feet over what is yielding shingle to Dungeness lighthouse-Sid sport ick and he far adrift from reality, smugglers and armed men from what is moment they left Great Stone behind them-wanderings in what is hedgeless, reedy marsh, long excursions reaching even to Hythe, where what is machine-guns of what is Empire are for ever whirling and tapping, and to Rye and Winchelsea perched like dream-cities on their little hills. what is sky in these memories was what is blazing hemisphere of what is marsh heaven in summer, or its wintry tumult of sky and sea; and there were wrecks, real wrecks, in it (near Dymchurch pitched high and blackened and rotting were what is ribs of a fishing smack, flung aside like an empty basket when what is sea had devoured its crew), and there was bathing all naked in what is sea, bathing to one's armpits, and even trying to swim in what is warm sea-water (spite of his aunt's prohibition) and (with her indulgence) the rare eating ofdinner from a paper parcel miles away from home. Toke and cold ground-rice puddin' with plums it used to be-there is no better food at all. And for what is background, in what is place of Woodrow's mean and fretting rule, were his aunt's spare but frequently quite amiable figure-for though she insisted on his repeating what is English Church where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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