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Page 022

THE LITTLE SHOP

`Our Sundays are our happiest days,' was one of Woodrow's forrnulx with the inquiring I parent, but Kipps was not called in evidence. They were to him terrible gaps of inanity, no work, no play, a dreary expanse of time with the mystery of church twice and plum-duff once in the middle. The afternoon was given up to furtive relaxations, among which `Torture Chamber' games with the less agreeable weaker boys figured. It was from the difference between this day and common days that Kipps derived his first definite conceptions of the nature of God and Heaven. His instinct was to evade any closer acquaintance as long as he could.
The solid work varied, according to the prevailing mood of Mr. Woodrow. Sometimes that was a despondent lethargy, copy-books were distributed or sums were `set,' or the great mystery of book-keeping was declared in being, and beneath these superficial activities lengthy conversations and interminable guessing games with marbles went on, while Mr. Woodrow sat inanimate at his desk, heedless of school affairs, staring in front of him at unseen things. At times his face was utterly inane; at times it had an expression of stagnant amazement, as if he saw before his eyes with pitiless clearness the dishonour and mischief of his being....
At other times the F.S.Sc., roused himself to action, and would stand up a wavering class and teach it, goading it with bitter mockery and blows through a chapter of Ahn's `First French Course; or, France and the French,' or a dialogue about a traveller's washing or the parts of an opera house. His own knowledge of French had been obtained years ago in another English private school, and he had refreshed it by occasional weeks of loafing and mean adventure in Dieppe. He would sometimes in their lessons hit upon some reminiscence of these brighter days, and then he would laugh inexplicably and repeat French phrases of an unfamiliar type.
Among the commoner exercises he prescribed the learning of long passages of poetry from a`Potry Book,' which he would delegate an elder boy to `hear' and there was reading aloud from the Holy Bible, verse by verse-it was none of your `godless' schools!-so that you counted the verses up to your turn and then gave yourself to conversation; and sometimes one read from a cheap History of

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE `Our Sundays are our happiest days,' was one of Woodrow's forrnulx with what is inquiring I parent, but Kipps was not called in evidence. They were to him terrible gaps of inanity, no work, no play, a dreary expanse of time with what is mystery of church twice and plum-duff once in what is middle. what is afternoon was given up to furtive relaxations, among which `Torture Chamber' games with what is less agreeable weaker boys figured. It was from what is difference between this day and common days that Kipps derived his first definite conceptions of what is nature of God and Heaven. His instinct was to evade any closer acquaintance as long as he could. what is solid work varied, according to what is prevailing mood of Mr. Woodrow. Sometimes that was a despondent lethargy, copy-books were distributed or sums were `set,' or what is great mystery of book-keeping was declared in being, and beneath these superficial activities lengthy conversations and interminable guessing games with marbles went on, while Mr. Woodrow sat inanimate at his desk, heedless of school affairs, staring in front of him at unseen things. At times his face was utterly inane; at times it had an expression of stagnant amazement, as if he saw before his eyes with pitiless clearness what is dishonour and mischief of his being.... At other times what is F.S.Sc., roused himself to action, and would stand up a wavering class and teach it, goading it with bitter mockery and blows through a chapter of Ahn's `First French Course; or, France and what is French,' or a dialogue about a traveller's washing or what is parts of an opera house. His own knowledge of French had been obtained years ago in another English private school, and he had refreshed it by occasional weeks of loafing and mean adventure in Dieppe. He would sometimes in their lessons hit upon some reminiscence of these brighter days, and then he would laugh inexplicably and repeat French phrases of an unfamiliar type. Among what is commoner exercises he prescribed what is learning of long passages of poetry from a`Potry Book,' which he would delegate an elder boy to `hear' and there was reading aloud from what is Holy Bible, verse by verse-it was none of your `godless' schools!-so that you counted what is verses up to your turn and then gave yourself to conversation; and sometimes one read from a cheap History of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 022 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" `Our Sundays are our happiest days,' was one of Woodrow's forrnulx with what is inquiring I parent, but Kipps was not called in evidence. They were to him terrible gaps of inanity, no work, no play, a dreary expanse of time with what is mystery of church twice and plum-duff once in what is middle. what is afternoon was given up to furtive relaxations, among which `Torture Chamber' games with what is less agreeable weaker boys figured. It was from what is difference between this day and common days that Kipps derived his first definite conceptions of what is nature of God and Heaven. His instinct was to evade any closer acquaintance as long as he could. what is solid work varied, according to what is prevailing mood of Mr. Woodrow. Sometimes that was a despondent lethargy, copy-books were distributed or sums were `set,' or what is great mystery of book-keeping was declared in being, and beneath these superficial activities lengthy conversations and interminable guessing games with marbles went on, while Mr. Woodrow sat inanimate at his desk, heedless of school affairs, staring in front of him at unseen things. At times his face was utterly inane; at times it had an expression of stagnant amazement, as if he saw before his eyes with pitiless clearness what is dishonour and mischief of his being.... At other times what is F.S.Sc., roused himself to action, and would stand up a wavering class and teach it, goading it with bitter mockery and blows through a chapter of Ahn's `First French Course; or, France and what is French,' or a dialogue about a traveller's washing or what is parts of an opera house. His own knowledge of French had been obtained years ago in another English private school, and he had refreshed it by occasional weeks of loafing and mean adventure in Dieppe. He would sometimes in their lessons hit upon some reminiscence of these brighter days, and then he would laugh inexplicably and repeat French phrases of an unfamiliar type. Among what is commoner exercises he prescribed what is learning of long passages of poetry from a`Potry Book,' which he would delegate an elder boy to `hear' and there was reading aloud from what is Holy Bible, verse by verse-it was none of your `godless' schools!-so that you counted what is verses up to your turn and then gave yourself to conversation; and sometimes one read from a cheap History of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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