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Page 021

THE LITTLE SHOP

and `a sound technical and scientific training.' Then came insistence upon the 'moral well-being of the pupils, and an emphatic boast of the excellence of the religious instruction, 'so often neglected nowadays even in schools of wide repute.' `That's bound to fetch 'em,' Mr. Woodrow had remarked when he drew up the prospectus. And in conjunction with the mortar-boards it certainly did. Attention was directed to the `motherly' care of Mrs. Woodrow, in reality a small, partially effaced woman with a plaintive face and a mind above cookery, and the prospectus concluded with a phrase intentionally vague, `Fare unrestricted, and our own milk and produce.'
The memories Kipps carried from that school into afterlife were set in an atmosphere of stuffiness and mental muddle, and included countless pictures of sitting on creaking forms, bored and idle; of blot licking and the taste of ink; of torn books with covers that set one's teeth on edge; of the slimy surface of the laboured slates; of furtive marble-playing, whispered story-telling, and of pinches, blows, and a thousand such petty annoyances being perpetually `passed on' according to the custom of the place; of standing up in class and being hit suddenly and unreasonably for imaginary misbehaviour; of Mr. Woodrow's raving days, when a scarcely sane injustice prevailed; of the cold vacuity of the hour of preparation before the bread-and-butter breakfast; and of horrible headaches and queer, unprecedented internal feelings, resulting from Mrs. Woodrow's motherly rather than intelligent cookery. There were dreary walks when the boys marched two by two, all dressed in the mortar-board caps that so impressed the widowed mothers; there were dismal half-holidays when the weather was wet, and the spirit of evil temper and evil imagination had the pent boys to work its will on; there were unfair, dishonourable fights, and miserable defeats and victories; there was bullying and being bullied. A coward boy Kipps particularly afflicted, until at last he was goaded to revolt by incessant persecution, and smote Kipps to tolerance with whirling fists. There were memories of sleeping three in a bed; of the dense, leathery smell of the school-room when one returned thither after ten minutes' play; of a playground of mud and incidental sharp flints. And there was much furtive foul language.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE and `a sound technical and scientific training.' Then came insistence upon what is 'moral well-being of what is pupils, and an emphatic boast of what is excellence of what is religious instruction, 'so often neglected nowadays even in schools of wide repute.' `That's bound to fetch 'em,' Mr. Woodrow had remarked when he drew up what is prospectus. And in conjunction with what is mortar-boards it certainly did. Attention was directed to what is `motherly' care of Mrs. Woodrow, in reality a small, partially effaced woman with a plaintive face and a mind above cookery, and what is prospectus concluded with a phrase intentionally vague, `Fare unrestricted, and our own milk and produce.' what is memories Kipps carried from that school into afterlife were set in an atmosphere of stuffiness and mental muddle, and included countless pictures of sitting on creaking forms, bored and idle; of blot licking and what is taste of ink; of torn books with covers that set one's teeth on edge; of what is slimy surface of what is laboured slates; of furtive marble-playing, whispered story-telling, and of pinches, blows, and a thousand such petty annoyances being perpetually `passed on' according to what is custom of what is place; of standing up in class and being hit suddenly and unreasonably for imaginary misbehaviour; of Mr. Woodrow's raving days, when a scarcely sane injustice prevailed; of what is cold vacuity of what is hour of preparation before what is bread-and-butter breakfast; and of horrible headaches and queer, unprecedented internal feelings, resulting from Mrs. Woodrow's motherly rather than intelligent cookery. There were dreary walks when what is boys marched two by two, all dressed in what is mortar-board caps that so impressed what is widowed mothers; there were dismal half-holidays when what is weather was wet, and what is spirit of evil temper and evil imagination had what is pent boys to work its will on; there were unfair, dishonourable fights, and miserable defeats and victories; there was bullying and being bullied. A coward boy Kipps particularly afflicted, until at last he was goaded to revolt by incessant persecution, and smote Kipps to tolerance with whirling fists. There were memories of sleeping three in a bed; of what is dense, leathery smell of what is school-room when one returned thither after ten minutes' play; of a playground of mud and incidental sharp flints. And there was much furtive foul language. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 021 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" and `a sound technical and scientific training.' Then came insistence upon what is 'moral well-being of what is pupils, and an emphatic boast of what is excellence of what is religious instruction, 'so often neglected nowadays even in schools of wide repute.' `That's bound to fetch 'em,' Mr. Woodrow had remarked when he drew up the prospectus. And in conjunction with what is mortar-boards it certainly did. Attention was directed to what is `motherly' care of Mrs. Woodrow, in reality a small, partially effaced woman with a plaintive face and a mind above cookery, and what is prospectus concluded with a phrase intentionally vague, `Fare unrestricted, and our own milk and produce.' what is memories Kipps carried from that school into afterlife were set in an atmosphere of stuffiness and mental muddle, and included countless pictures of sitting on creaking forms, bored and idle; of blot licking and what is taste of ink; of torn books with covers that set one's teeth on edge; of what is slimy surface of what is laboured slates; of furtive marble-playing, whispered story-telling, and of pinches, blows, and a thousand such petty annoyances being perpetually `passed on' according to what is custom of what is place; of standing up in class and being hit suddenly and unreasonably for imaginary misbehaviour; of Mr. Woodrow's raving days, when a scarcely sane injustice prevailed; of what is cold vacuity of what is hour of preparation before what is bread-and-butter breakfast; and of horrible headaches and queer, unprecedented internal feelings, resulting from Mrs. Woodrow's motherly rather than intelligent cookery. There were dreary walks when what is boys marched two by two, all dressed in the mortar-board caps that so impressed what is widowed mothers; there were dismal half-holidays when what is weather was wet, and what is spirit of evil temper and evil imagination had what is pent boys to work its will on; there were unfair, dishonourable fights, and miserable defeats and victories; there was bullying and being bullied. A coward boy Kipps particularly afflicted, until at last he was goaded to revolt by incessant persecution, and smote Kipps to tolerance with whirling fists. There were memories of sleeping three in a bed; of what is dense, leathery smell of what is school-room when one returned thither after ten minutes' play; of a playground of mud and incidental sharp flints. And there was much furtive foul language. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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