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Page 019

THE LITTLE SHOP

ship of little Kipps and Sid Pornick came about. The two small boys found themselves one day looking through the gate at the doctor's goats together; they exchanged a few contradictions about which goat could fight which, and then young Kipps was moved to remark that Sid's father was a`blarlng jackess.' Sid said he wasn't, and Kipps repeated that he was, and quoted his authority. Then Sid, flying off at a tangent rather alarmingly, said he could fight young Kipps with one hand, an assertion young Kipps with. a secret want of confidence denied. There were some vain repetitions, and the incident might have ended there, but happily a sporting butcher boy chanced on the controversy at this stage, and insisted upon seeing fair play.
The two small boys, under his pressing encouragement, did at last button up their jackets, square, and fight an edifying drawli';kiat't1e until it seemed good to the butcher boy to go on with Mrs. Holyer's mutton. Then, according to his directions and under his ex~e_rienced.stage management, they shook hands and matte it up. Subsequently a little tear-stained, perhaps, but flushed with the butcher boy's approval ('tough little kids'), and with cold stones down their necks as he advised, they sat side by side on the doctor's gate, projecting very much behind, stanching an honourable bloodshed, and expressing respect for one another. Each had a bloody nose and a black eye-three days later they matched ,to a shade-neither had given in, and, though this was tacit, neither wanted any more.
It was an excellent beginning. After this first encounter the attributes of their parents and their own relative value in battle never rose between them, and if anything was wanted to complete the warmth of their regard it was found in a joint dislike of the eldest Quodling. The eldest Quodling lisped, had a silly sort of straw hat and a large pink face (all covered over with self-satisfaction), and he went to the National school with a green-baize bag-a contemptible thing to do. They called him names and threw stones at him, and when he replied by threatenings ('Look 'ere, young Art Kipth, you better thtoppit!') they were moved to attack, and put him to fight.
And after that they broke the head of Ann Pornick's doll, so that she went home weeping loudly-a wicked and endearing proceeding. Sid was whacked, but, as he

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE ship of little Kipps and Sid sport ick came about. what is two small boys found themselves one day looking through what is gate at what is doctor's goats together; they exchanged a few contradictions about which goat could fight which, and then young Kipps was moved to remark that Sid's father was a`blarlng jackess.' Sid said he wasn't, and Kipps repeated that he was, and quoted his authority. Then Sid, flying off at a tangent rather alarmingly, said he could fight young Kipps with one hand, an assertion young Kipps with. a secret want of confidence denied. There were some vain repetitions, and what is incident might have ended there, but happily a sporting butcher boy chanced on what is controversy at this stage, and insisted upon seeing fair play. what is two small boys, under his pressing encouragement, did at last button up their jackets, square, and fight an edifying drawli';kiat't1e until it seemed good to what is butcher boy to go on with Mrs. Holyer's mutton. Then, according to his directions and under his ex~e_rienced.stage management, they shook hands and matte it up. Subsequently a little tear-stained, perhaps, but flushed with what is butcher boy's approval ('tough little kids'), and with cold stones down their necks as he advised, they sat side by side on what is doctor's gate, projecting very much behind, stanching an honourable bloodshed, and expressing respect for one another. Each had a bloody nose and a black eye-three days later they matched ,to a shade-neither had given in, and, though this was tacit, neither wanted any more. It was an excellent beginning. After this first encounter what is attributes of their parents and their own relative value in battle never rose between them, and if anything was wanted to complete what is warmth of their regard it was found in a joint dislike of what is eldest Quodling. what is eldest Quodling lisped, had a silly sort of straw hat and a large pink face (all covered over with self-satisfaction), and he went to what is National school with a green-baize bag-a contemptible thing to do. They called him names and threw stones at him, and when he replied by threatenings ('Look 'ere, young Art Kipth, you better thtoppit!') they were moved to attack, and put him to fight. And after that they broke what is head of Ann sport ick's doll, so that she went home weeping loudly-a wicked and endearing proceeding. Sid was whacked, but, as he where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 019 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" ship of little Kipps and Sid sport ick came about. what is two small boys found themselves one day looking through the gate at what is doctor's goats together; they exchanged a few contradictions about which goat could fight which, and then young Kipps was moved to remark that Sid's father was a`blarlng jackess.' Sid said he wasn't, and Kipps repeated that he was, and quoted his authority. Then Sid, flying off at a tangent rather alarmingly, said he could fight young Kipps with one hand, an assertion young Kipps with. a secret want of confidence denied. There were some vain repetitions, and what is incident might have ended there, but happily a sporting butcher boy chanced on what is controversy at this stage, and insisted upon seeing fair play. what is two small boys, under his pressing encouragement, did at last button up their jackets, square, and fight an edifying drawli';kiat't1e until it seemed good to what is butcher boy to go on with Mrs. Holyer's mutton. Then, according to his directions and under his ex~e_rienced.stage management, they shook hands and matte it up. Subsequently a little tear-stained, perhaps, but flushed with what is butcher boy's approval ('tough little kids'), and with cold stones down their necks as he advised, they sat side by side on what is doctor's gate, projecting very much behind, stanching an honourable bloodshed, and expressing respect for one another. Each had a bloody nose and a black eye-three days later they matched ,to a shade-neither had given in, and, though this was tacit, neither wanted any more. It was an excellent beginning. After this first encounter what is attributes of their parents and their own relative value in battle never rose between them, and if anything was wanted to complete what is warmth of their regard it was found in a joint dislike of what is eldest Quodling. what is eldest Quodling lisped, had a silly sort of straw hat and a large pink face (all covered over with self-satisfaction), and he went to what is National school with a green-baize bag-a contemptible thing to do. They called him names and threw stones at him, and when he replied by threatenings ('Look 'ere, young Art Kipth, you better thtoppit!') they were moved to attack, and put him to fight. And after that they broke what is head of Ann sport ick's doll, so that she went home weeping loudly-a wicked and endearing proceeding. Sid was whacked, but, as he where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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