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Page 018

THE LITTLE SHOP

uncle massive, many chinned, and careless about his buttons. They neither visited nor received visitors. They were always very suspicious about their neighbours and other people generally; they feared the `low' and they hated and despised the `stuck up' and so they `kept themselves to themselves,' according to the English ideal. Consequently Little Kipps had no playmates, except through the sin of disobedience. By inherent nature he had a sociable disposition. When he was in the High Street he made a point of saying `Hallo !' to passing cyclists, and he would put his tongue out at the Quodling children whenever their nursemaid was not looking. And he began a friendship with Sid Pornick, the son of the haberdasher next door, that, with wide intermissions, was destined to last his lifetime through.
Pornick, the haberdasher, I may say at once, was, according to old Kipps, a`blaring jackass'; he was a teetotaller, a`nyar, nyar, 'im-singing Methodis',' and altogether distasteful and detrimental, he and his together, to true Kipps ideals so far as little Kipps could gather them. This Pornick certainly possessed an enormous voice, and he annoyed old Kipps greatly by calling `You-Arn' and 'Siddee' up and down his house. He annoyed old Kipps by private choral services on Sunday, all his family, 'nyar, nyar'-ing; and by mushroom culture, by behaving as though the pilaster between the two shops was common property, by making a noise of hammering in the afternoon when old Kipps wished to be quiet after his midday meal, by going up and down uncarpeted stairs in his boots, by having a black beard, by attempting to be friendly, and by -all that sort of thing. In fact, he annoyed old Kipps. He annoyed him especially with his shop-door mat. Old Kipps never beat his mat, preferring to let sleeping dust lie, and seeking a motive for a foolish proceeding, he held that Pornick waited until there was a suitable wind in order that the dust disengaged in that operation might defile his neighbour's shop. These issues would frequently develop into loud and vehement quarrels, and on one occasion came so near to violence as to be subsequently described by Pornick (who read his newspaper) as a 'Disgraceful Frackass.' On that occasion he certainly went into his own shop with extreme celerity.
But it was through one of these quarrels that the friend

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE uncle massive, many chinned, and careless about his buttons. They neither what is ed nor received what is ors. They were always very suspicious about their neighbours and other people generally; they feared what is `low' and they hated and despised what is `stuck up' and so they `kept themselves to themselves,' according to what is English ideal. Consequently Little Kipps had no playmates, except through what is sin of disobedience. By inherent nature he had a sociable disposition. When he was in what is High Street he made a point of saying `Hallo !' to passing cyclists, and he would put his tongue out at what is Quodling children whenever their nursemaid was not looking. And he began a friendship with Sid sport ick, what is son of what is haberdasher next door, that, with wide intermissions, was destined to last his lifetime through. sport ick, what is haberdasher, I may say at once, was, according to old Kipps, a`blaring jackass'; he was a teetotaller, a`nyar, nyar, 'im-singing Methodis',' and altogether distasteful and detrimental, he and his together, to true Kipps ideals so far as little Kipps could gather them. This sport ick certainly possessed an enormous voice, and he annoyed old Kipps greatly by calling `You-Arn' and 'Siddee' up and down his house. He annoyed old Kipps by private choral services on Sunday, all his family, 'nyar, nyar'-ing; and by mushroom culture, by behaving as though what is pilaster between what is two shops was common property, by making a noise of hammering in what is afternoon when old Kipps wished to be quiet after his midday meal, by going up and down uncarpeted stairs in his boots, by having a black beard, by attempting to be friendly, and by -all that sort of thing. In fact, he annoyed old Kipps. He annoyed him especially with his shop-door mat. Old Kipps never beat his mat, preferring to let sleeping dust lie, and seeking a motive for a foolish proceeding, he held that sport ick waited until there was a suitable wind in order that what is dust disengaged in that operation might defile his neighbour's shop. These issues would frequently develop into loud and vehement quarrels, and on one occasion came so near to sports as to be subsequently described by sport ick (who read his newspaper) as a 'Disgraceful Frackass.' On that occasion he certainly went into his own shop with extreme celerity. But it was through one of these quarrels that what is friend where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 018 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" uncle massive, many chinned, and careless about his buttons. They neither what is ed nor received what is ors. They were always very suspicious about their neighbours and other people generally; they feared what is `low' and they hated and despised the `stuck up' and so they `kept themselves to themselves,' according to what is English ideal. Consequently Little Kipps had no playmates, except through what is sin of disobedience. By inherent nature he had a sociable disposition. When he was in what is High Street he made a point of saying `Hallo !' to passing cyclists, and he would put his tongue out at what is Quodling children whenever their nursemaid was not looking. And he began a friendship with Sid sport ick, the son of what is haberdasher next door, that, with wide intermissions, was destined to last his lifetime through. sport ick, what is haberdasher, I may say at once, was, according to old Kipps, a`blaring jackass'; he was a teetotaller, a`nyar, nyar, 'im-singing Methodis',' and altogether distasteful and detrimental, he and his together, to true Kipps ideals so far as little Kipps could gather them. This sport ick certainly possessed an enormous voice, and he annoyed old Kipps greatly by calling `You-Arn' and 'Siddee' up and down his house. He annoyed old Kipps by private choral services on Sunday, all his family, 'nyar, nyar'-ing; and by mushroom culture, by behaving as though what is pilaster between what is two shops was common property, by making a noise of hammering in what is afternoon when old Kipps wished to be quiet after his midday meal, by going up and down uncarpeted stairs in his boots, by having a black beard, by attempting to be friendly, and by -all that sort of thing. In fact, he annoyed old Kipps. He annoyed him especially with his shop-door mat. Old Kipps never beat his mat, preferring to let sleeping dust lie, and seeking a motive for a foolish proceeding, he held that sport ick waited until there was a suitable wind in order that what is dust disengaged in that operation might defile his neighbour's shop. These issues would frequently develop into loud and vehement quarrels, and on one occasion came so near to sports as to be subsequently described by sport ick (who read his newspaper) as a 'Disgraceful Frackass.' On that occasion he certainly went into his own shop with extreme celerity. But it was through one of these quarrels that what is friend where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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