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Page 017

THE LITTLE SHOP

unhappily, one rose to their Olympian level at meals. 'Then one had to say one's `grace,' hold one's spoon and fork in mad, unnatural ways called `properly,' and refrain from eating even nice, sweet things `too fast.' If he `gobbled' there was trouble, and at the slightest abandon with knife, fork, and spoon his aunt rapped his knuckles, albeit his uncle always finished up his gravy with his knife. Sometimes, moreover, his uncle would come pipe in hand out of a sedentary remoteness in the most disconcerting way when a little boy was doing the most natural and attractive things, with `Drat and drabbit that young rascal! What's he a-doing of now?' and his aunt would appear at door or window to interrupt interesting conversation with children who were upon unknown grounds considered `low' and undesirable, and call him in. The pleasantest little noises, however softly you did them, drumming on tea-trays, trumpeting your fists, whistling on keys, ringing chimes with a couple of pails, or playing tunes on the window-panes, brought down the gods in anger. Yet what noise is fainter than your finger on the window-gently done? Sometimes, however, these gods gave him broken toys out of the shop, and then one loved them better-for the shop they kept was, among other things, a toy-shop. (The other things included books to read and books to give away, and local photographs; it had some pretentions to be a china-shop and the fascia spoke of glass; it was also a stationer's shop with a touch of haberdashery about it, and in the windows and odd corners were mats and terra-cotta dishes and milkingstools for painting, and there was a hint of picture-frames, and fire-screens, and fishing-tackle, and air-guns and bathing-suits, and tents-various things, indeed, but all cruelly attractive to a small boy's fingers.) Once his aunt gave him a trumpet if he would promise faithfully not to blow it, and afterwards took it away again. And his aunt made him say his catechism, and something she certainly called the `Colic for the Day,' every Sunday in the year.
As the two grew old as he grew up, and as his impression of them modified insensibly from vear to year, it seemed to him at last that they had always been as they were when in his adolescent days 'his impression of things grew fixed; his aunt he thought of as always lean, rather worried looking, and prone to a certain obliquity of cap, and his

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE unhappily, one rose to their Olympian level at meals. 'Then one had to say one's `grace,' hold one's spoon and fork in mad, unnatural ways called `properly,' and refrain from eating even nice, sweet things `too fast.' If he `gobbled' there was trouble, and at what is slightest abandon with knife, fork, and spoon his aunt rapped his knuckles, albeit his uncle always finished up his gravy with his knife. Sometimes, moreover, his uncle would come pipe in hand out of a sedentary remoteness in what is most disconcerting way when a little boy was doing what is most natural and attractive things, with `Drat and drabbit that young rascal! What's he a-doing of now?' and his aunt would appear at door or window to interrupt interesting conversation with children who were upon unknown grounds considered `low' and undesirable, and call him in. what is pleasantest little noises, however softly you did them, drumming on tea-trays, trumpeting your fists, whistling on keys, ringing chimes with a couple of pails, or playing tunes on what is window-panes, brought down what is gods in anger. Yet what noise is fainter than your finger on what is window-gently done? Sometimes, however, these gods gave him broken toys out of what is shop, and then one loved them better-for what is shop they kept was, among other things, a toy-shop. (The other things included books to read and books to give away, and local photographs; it had some pretentions to be a china-shop and what is fascia spoke of glass; it was also a stationer's shop with a touch of haberdashery about it, and in what is windows and odd corners were mats and terra-cotta dishes and milkingstools for painting, and there was a hint of picture-frames, and fire-screens, and fishing-tackle, and air-guns and bathing-suits, and tents-various things, indeed, but all cruelly attractive to a small boy's fingers.) Once his aunt gave him a trumpet if he would promise faithfully not to blow it, and afterwards took it away again. And his aunt made him say his catechism, and something she certainly called what is `Colic for what is Day,' every Sunday in what is year. As what is two grew old as he grew up, and as his impression of them modified insensibly from vear to year, it seemed to him at last that they had always been as they were when in his adolescent days 'his impression of things grew fixed; his aunt he thought of as always lean, rather worried looking, and prone to a certain obliquity of cap, and his where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 017 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" unhappily, one rose to their Olympian level at meals. 'Then one had to say one's `grace,' hold one's spoon and fork in mad, unnatural ways called `properly,' and refrain from eating even nice, sweet things `too fast.' If he `gobbled' there was trouble, and at what is slightest abandon with knife, fork, and spoon his aunt rapped his knuckles, albeit his uncle always finished up his gravy with his knife. Sometimes, moreover, his uncle would come pipe in hand out of a sedentary remoteness in what is most disconcerting way when a little boy was doing what is most natural and attractive things, with `Drat and drabbit that young rascal! What's he a-doing of now?' and his aunt would appear at door or window to interrupt interesting conversation with children who were upon unknown grounds considered `low' and undesirable, and call him in. what is pleasantest little noises, however softly you did them, drumming on tea-trays, trumpeting your fists, whistling on keys, ringing chimes with a couple of pails, or playing tunes on what is window-panes, brought down what is gods in anger. Yet what noise is fainter than your finger on what is window-gently done? Sometimes, however, these gods gave him broken toys out of what is shop, and then one loved them better-for what is shop they kept was, among other things, a toy-shop. (The other things included books to read and books to give away, and local photographs; it had some pretentions to be a china-shop and the fascia spoke of glass; it was also a stationer's shop with a touch of haberdashery about it, and in what is windows and odd corners were mats and terra-cotta dishes and milkingstools for painting, and there was a hint of picture-frames, and fire-screens, and fishing-tackle, and air-guns and bathing-suits, and tents-various things, indeed, but all cruelly attractive to a small boy's fingers.) Once his aunt gave him a trumpet if he would promise faithfully not to blow it, and afterwards took it away again. And his aunt made him say his catechism, and something she certainly called what is `Colic for what is Day,' every Sunday in what is year. As what is two grew old as he grew up, and as his impression of them modified insensibly from vear to year, it seemed to him at last that they had always been as they were when in his adolescent days 'his impression of things grew fixed; his aunt he thought of as always lean, rather worried looking, and prone to a certain obliquity of cap, and his where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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