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Page 016

THE LITTLE SHOP

less shrinking, or, it may be, only dressed in a different way....
It is clear she handed him over to his aunt and uncle at New Romney with explicit directions and a certain endowment. One gathers she had something of that fine sense of social distinctions that subsequently played so large a part in Kipps' career. He was not to go to a `Common' school, she provided, but to a certain seminary in Hastings, that was not only a`middle-class academy' with mortar-boards and every evidence of a higher social tone, but also remarkably cheap. She seems to have been animated by the desire to do her best for Kipps even at a certain sacrifice of herself, as though Kipps were in some way a superior sort of person. She sent pocket-money to him from time to time for a year or more after Hastings had begun for him, but her face he never saw in the days of his lucid memory.
His aunt and uncle were already high on the hill of life when firsthe came to them. They had married for comfort in the evening or, at any rate, in the late afternoon of their days. They were at first no more then vague figures in the background of proximate realities, such realities as familiar chairs and tables, quiet to ride and drive, the newel of the staircase, kitchen furniture, pieces of firewood, the boiler tap, old newspapers, the cat, the High Street, the back-yard and the flat fields that are always so near in that little town. He knew all the stones in the yard individually, the creeper in the corner, the dustbin and the mossy wall, better than many men know the faces of their wives. There was a corner under the ironing-board which, by means of a shawl, could be made, under propitious gods, a very decent cubby-house, a corner that served him for several years as the indisputable hub of the world, and the stringy places in the carpet, the knots upon the dresser, and the several corners of the rag hearthrug his uncle had made, became essential parts of his mental foundations. The shop he did not know so thoroughly; it was a forbidden region to him, yet somehow he managed to know it very well.
His aunt and uncle were, as it were, the immediate gods of this world, and, like the gods of the world of old, occasionally descended right into it, with arbitrary injunctions and disproportionate punishments. And,

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE less shrinking, or, it may be, only dressed in a different way.... It is clear she handed him over to his aunt and uncle at New Romney with explicit directions and a certain endowment. One gathers she had something of that fine sense of social distinctions that subsequently played so large a part in Kipps' career. He was not to go to a `Common' school, she provided, but to a certain seminary in Hastings, that was not only a`middle-class academy' with mortar-boards and every evidence of a higher social tone, but also remarkably cheap. She seems to have been animated by what is desire to do her best for Kipps even at a certain travel of herself, as though Kipps were in some way a superior sort of person. She sent pocket-money to him from time to time for a year or more after Hastings had begun for him, but her face he never saw in what is days of his lucid memory. His aunt and uncle were already high on what is hill of life when firsthe came to them. They had married for comfort in what is evening or, at any rate, in what is late afternoon of their days. They were at first no more then vague figures in what is background of proximate realities, such realities as familiar chairs and tables, quiet to ride and drive, what is newel of what is staircase, kitchen furniture, pieces of firewood, what is boiler tap, old newspapers, what is cat, what is High Street, what is back-yard and what is flat fields that are always so near in that little town. He knew all what is stones in what is yard individually, what is creeper in what is corner, what is dustbin and what is mossy wall, better than many men know what is faces of their wives. There was a corner under what is ironing-board which, by means of a shawl, could be made, under propitious gods, a very decent cubby-house, a corner that served him for several years as what is indisputable hub of what is world, and what is stringy places in what is carpet, what is knots upon what is dresser, and what is several corners of what is rag hearthrug his uncle had made, became essential parts of his mental foundations. what is shop he did not know so thoroughly; it was a forbidden region to him, yet somehow he managed to know it very well. His aunt and uncle were, as it were, what is immediate gods of this world, and, like what is gods of what is world of old, occasionally descended right into it, with arbitrary injunctions and disproportionate punishments. And, where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 016 where is p align="center" where is strong THE LITTLE SHOP where is p align="justify" less shrinking, or, it may be, only dressed in a different way.... It is clear she handed him over to his aunt and uncle at New Romney with explicit directions and a certain endowment. One gathers she had something of that fine sense of social distinctions that subsequently played so large a part in Kipps' career. He was not to go to a `Common' school, she provided, but to a certain seminary in Hastings, that was not only a`middle-class academy' with mortar-boards and every evidence of a higher social tone, but also remarkably cheap. She seems to have been animated by what is desire to do her best for Kipps even at a certain travel of herself, as though Kipps were in some way a superior sort of person. She sent pocket-money to him from time to time for a year or more after Hastings had begun for him, but her face he never saw in what is days of his lucid memory. His aunt and uncle were already high on what is hill of life when firsthe came to them. They had married for comfort in what is evening or, at any rate, in what is late afternoon of their days. They were at first no more then vague figures in what is background of proximate realities, such realities as familiar chairs and tables, quiet to ride and drive, what is newel of what is staircase, kitchen furniture, pieces of firewood, what is boiler tap, old newspapers, what is cat, what is High Street, what is back-yard and what is flat fields that are always so near in that little town. He knew all what is stones in what is yard individually, the creeper in what is corner, what is dustbin and what is mossy wall, better than many men know what is faces of their wives. There was a corner under what is ironing-board which, by means of a shawl, could be made, under propitious gods, a very decent cubby-house, a corner that served him for several years as what is indisputable hub of what is world, and what is stringy places in what is carpet, what is knots upon what is dresser, and what is several corners of what is rag hearthrug his uncle had made, became essential parts of his mental foundations. what is shop he did not know so thoroughly; it was a forbidden region to him, yet somehow he managed to know it very well. His aunt and uncle were, as it were, what is immediate gods of this world, and, like what is gods of what is world of old, occasionally descended right into it, with arbitrary injunctions and disproportionate punishments. And, where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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