Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 011

INTRODUCTION

view of life, `and you come along in a year's time and there it is. But money-look 'ow it comes and goes! There's no sense in money.' And so we leave him-not the finest of men, for he was born into a stupid world, but one for whom his single great virtue, in making him lovable, has done its best with what the world allowed.
The scope of a subject is in the writer's mind, not in itself: therefore let no one say that Mr. Wells chose a slender channel in this vacuous young man for his rich humour. To the zoologist an accurate description of a field-mouse has precisely the same scientific interest as an accurate description of an elephant. Kipps is Mr. Wells' field-mouse, whom, with his world, he has described with gusto. This is the first ample display of his comic powers and every part of it is full of life. The draper's shop, Shalford with his `system,' the meal at which the assistants congratulate Kipps-all these are drawn with that vivid mingling of observation and imagination which is Mr. Wells' finest gift. And here too we can find scattered widely examples of his gift of richly grotesque comic description-as Mr. Cootes' disapproving cough, `a sound rather more like a very, very old sheep a quarter of a mile away being blown to pieces by a small charge of gunpowder than anything else in the world.'
The old admirers, I have said, were soon captivated, if at first they were disappointed. For this book, with its rich comic detail, its comedy springing, as all fine comedy must, from strong feeling, was something more than a promise of genius wider, and more profuse, if not so nearly perfect, than anything to be foreseen from the earlier books.
EDWARD SHANKS

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE view of life, `and you come along in a year's time and there it is. But money-look 'ow it comes and goes! There's no sense in money.' And so we leave him-not what is finest of men, for he was born into a stupid world, but one for whom his single great virtue, in making him lovable, has done its best with what what is world allowed. what is scope of a subject is in what is writer's mind, not in itself: therefore let no one say that Mr. Wells chose a slender channel in this vacuous young man for his rich humour. To what is zoologist an accurate description of a field-mouse has precisely what is same scientific interest as an accurate description of an elephant. Kipps is Mr. Wells' field-mouse, whom, with his world, he has described with gusto. This is what is first ample display of his comic powers and every part of it is full of life. what is draper's shop, Shalford with his `system,' what is meal at which what is assistants congratulate Kipps-all these are drawn with that vivid mingling of observation and imagination which is Mr. Wells' finest gift. And here too we can find scattered widely examples of his gift of richly grotesque comic description-as Mr. Cootes' disapproving cough, `a sound rather more like a very, very old sheep a quarter of a mile away being blown to pieces by a small charge of gunpowder than anything else in what is world.' what is old admirers, I have said, were soon captivated, if at first they were disappointed. For this book, with its rich comic detail, its comedy springing, as all fine comedy must, from strong feeling, was something more than a promise of genius wider, and more profuse, if not so nearly perfect, than anything to be foreseen from what is earlier books. EDWARD SHANKS where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 011 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" view of life, `and you come along in a year's time and there it is. But money-look 'ow it comes and goes! There's no sense in money.' And so we leave him-not what is finest of men, for he was born into a stupid world, but one for whom his single great virtue, in making him lovable, has done its best with what what is world allowed. what is scope of a subject is in what is writer's mind, not in itself: therefore let no one say that Mr. Wells chose a slender channel in this vacuous young man for his rich humour. To what is zoologist an accurate description of a field-mouse has precisely what is same scientific interest as an accurate description of an elephant. Kipps is Mr. Wells' field-mouse, whom, with his world, he has described with gusto. This is what is first ample display of his comic powers and every part of it is full of life. what is draper's shop, Shalford with his `system,' what is meal at which what is assistants congratulate Kipps-all these are drawn with that vivid mingling of observation and imagination which is Mr. Wells' finest gift. And here too we can find scattered widely examples of his gift of richly grotesque comic description-as Mr. Cootes' disapproving cough, `a sound rather more like a very, very old sheep a quarter of a mile away being blown to pieces by a small charge of gunpowder than anything else in what is world.' what is old admirers, I have said, were soon captivated, if at first they were disappointed. For this book, with its rich comic detail, its comedy springing, as all fine comedy must, from strong feeling, was something more than a promise of genius wider, and more profuse, if not so nearly perfect, than anything to be foreseen from the earlier books. EDWARD SHANKS where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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