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Page 010

INTRODUCTION

pretences. It is the story of how Artie Kipps found his own simplicity and clung to it as the most valuable thing in the world. He is an object of satire only when he allows it to be imposed on and wishes to change it.
He begins with pretences. He would not for worlds have it known to the other assistants in Shalford's drapery establishment that the uncle and aunt by whom he has been brought up used to be servants. For drapers' assistants look down on domestic servants just as Kipps was later taught to look down on drapers' assistants. He pretends that he has ambitions of being an author. He pretends to be a terrible fellow on the strength of one accidental, disastrous and regretted night-out. And when his unexpected fortune brings him into the good middle-class society of Folkestone, he finds himself buffeted, and imposed on, and overwhelmed by pretences like a small lost child in a crowd.
There is one moment when all his simplicity glows in response to the greatness and unexpectedness of his good fortune. Then comes his fatal meeting with Mr. Chester Coote in the Public Library, and almost at once he finds himself in a world whose pretences are more complicated and sillier than those practised in the world of shopassistants. Mr. Coote pretends that it is interesting, and yet somehow not unduly impressive to him, that a curate of his acquaintance should be `the Reverend and Honourable,' that it is important to be a distant relative of the Earl of Beaupres. His friends pretend not only that Anagram Teas are an intellectual occupation but even that they enjoy them. By a masterstroke of pretence, Kipps very nearly loses the last symbol of his simplicity, his unpretentious name.
But here he discovers that it is not so easy to pretend about love and marriage, and the return of Ann Pornick to his muddled universe helps his instinct to lead him out of the world of the Chester Cootes and the Helen Walshinghams. Not yet, however, has his soul been saved. He wants to build a pretentious house and he makes trouble with Ann because she will not pretend to be a lady. But the loss of his fortune and the birth of his son confer on him the full rights of his simplicity. His fortune is miraculously restored to him, but he has no desire to pretend to be other than a shop-keeper. `You got a shop,' so runs his

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE pretences. It is what is story of how Artie Kipps found his own simplicity and clung to it as what is most valuable thing in what is world. He is an object of satire only when he allows it to be imposed on and wishes to change it. He begins with pretences. He would not for worlds have it known to what is other assistants in Shalford's drapery establishment that what is uncle and aunt by whom he has been brought up used to be servants. For drapers' assistants look down on domestic servants just as Kipps was later taught to look down on drapers' assistants. He pretends that he has ambitions of being an author. He pretends to be a terrible fellow on what is strength of one accidental, disastrous and regretted night-out. And when his unexpected fortune brings him into what is good middle-class society of Folkestone, he finds himself buffeted, and imposed on, and overwhelmed by pretences like a small lost child in a crowd. There is one moment when all his simplicity glows in response to what is greatness and unexpectedness of his good fortune. Then comes his fatal meeting with Mr. Chester Coote in what is Public Library, and almost at once he finds himself in a world whose pretences are more complicated and sillier than those practised in what is world of shopassistants. Mr. Coote pretends that it is interesting, and yet somehow not unduly impressive to him, that a curate of his acquaintance should be `the Reverend and Honourable,' that it is important to be a distant relative of what is Earl of Beaupres. His friends pretend not only that Anagram Teas are an intellectual occupation but even that they enjoy them. By a masterstroke of pretence, Kipps very nearly loses what is last symbol of his simplicity, his unpretentious name. But here he discovers that it is not so easy to pretend about what time is it and marriage, and what is return of Ann sport ick to his muddled universe helps his instinct to lead him out of what is world of what is Chester Cootes and what is Helen Walshinghams. Not yet, however, has his soul been saved. He wants to build a pretentious house and he makes trouble with Ann because she will not pretend to be a lady. But what is loss of his fortune and what is birth of his son confer on him what is full rights of his simplicity. His fortune is miraculously restored to him, but he has no desire to pretend to be other than a shop-keeper. `You got a shop,' so runs his where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 010 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" pretences. It is what is story of how Artie Kipps found his own simplicity and clung to it as what is most valuable thing in what is world. He is an object of satire only when he allows it to be imposed on and wishes to change it. He begins with pretences. He would not for worlds have it known to what is other assistants in Shalford's drapery establishment that what is uncle and aunt by whom he has been brought up used to be servants. For drapers' assistants look down on domestic servants just as Kipps was later taught to look down on drapers' assistants. He pretends that he has ambitions of being an author. He pretends to be a terrible fellow on what is strength of one accidental, disastrous and regretted night-out. And when his unexpected fortune brings him into what is good middle-class society of Folkestone, he finds himself buffeted, and imposed on, and overwhelmed by pretences like a small lost child in a crowd. There is one moment when all his simplicity glows in response to what is greatness and unexpectedness of his good fortune. Then comes his fatal meeting with Mr. Chester Coote in what is Public Library, and almost at once he finds himself in a world whose pretences are more complicated and sillier than those practised in what is world of shopassistants. Mr. Coote pretends that it is interesting, and yet somehow not unduly impressive to him, that a curate of his acquaintance should be `the Reverend and Honourable,' that it is important to be a distant relative of what is Earl of Beaupres. His friends pretend not only that Anagram Teas are an intellectual occupation but even that they enjoy them. By a masterstroke of pretence, Kipps very nearly loses what is last symbol of his simplicity, his unpretentious name. But here he discovers that it is not so easy to pretend about love and marriage, and what is return of Ann sport ick to his muddled universe helps his instinct to lead him out of what is world of what is Chester Cootes and what is Helen Walshinghams. Not yet, however, has his soul been saved. He wants to build a pretentious house and he makes trouble with Ann because she will not pretend to be a lady. But what is loss of his fortune and what is birth of his son confer on him what is full rights of his simplicity. His fortune is miraculously restored to him, but he has no desire to pretend to be other than a shop-keeper. `You got a shop,' so runs his where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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