Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 009

INTRODUCTION

sequent story arose from his character as well as his situation. And the time came for characters better to be exhibited in normal than in abnormal situations.
In his early books there was another quality, the obvious desire not only to consider humanity as a whole and to discover what it might be `up to' but also to consider means of persuading it to do better. Mr. Wells was always a sociologist, if so cold a term may be used by any one but himself of a man who brought so warm an imagination to his sociological researches. He was also, and very earnestly, a preacher. He hated cruelty and pain and waste, and he wanted other people to hate them, or rather to awake from the stupid lethargy which tolerates them. The parable of the invisible man or of the creatures on Dr. Moreau's island might serve to express a universal truth but not with the breath or warmth of appeal of a picture of ordinary human beings in ordinary circumstances.
And so we find him writing here:
`The stupid little tragedies of these clipped and limited lives !
`As I think of them lying unhappily there in the darkness, my vision pierces the night. See what I can see! Above them, brooding over them, I tell you, there is a monster, a lumpish monster, like some great clumsy griffin thing, like the Crystal Palace labyrinthodon, like Coote, like the leaden goddess of the Dunciad, like some fat, proud flunkey, like pride, like indolence, like all that is darkening and heavy and obstructive in life. It is matter and darkness, it is the anti-soul, it is the
ruling power of this land, Stupidity. My Kippses live in its shadow.'

It is perhaps a little crude, this direct appeal from the narrator: Mr. Wells managed the same effect more skilfully later. But when one reads it, when he goes on to say that he has laughed at the Kippses and has invited us to laugh at them but thinks of them as `children who feel pain, who are naughty and muddled and suffer, and do not understand why'-when one reads this it is clear that the scientific romance could not have been for ever the vehicle of his passion.
Kipps is, in his own sub-title, `The Story of a Simple Soul.' Simplicity invites pretence, which flourishes near it, like a reversal of nettle and dock; and this is a comedy of

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE sequent story arose from his character as well as his situation. And what is time came for characters better to be exhibited in normal than in abnormal situations. In his early books there was another quality, what is obvious desire not only to consider humanity as a whole and to discover what it might be `up to' but also to consider means of persuading it to do better. Mr. Wells was always a sociologist, if so cold a term may be used by any one but himself of a man who brought so warm an imagination to his sociological researches. He was also, and very earnestly, a preacher. He hated cruelty and pain and waste, and he wanted other people to hate them, or rather to awake from what is stupid lethargy which tolerates them. what is parable of what is invisible man or of what is creatures on Dr. Moreau's island might serve to express a universal truth but not with what is breath or warmth of appeal of a picture of ordinary human beings in ordinary circumstances. And so we find him writing here: `The stupid little tragedies of these clipped and limited lives ! `As I think of them lying unhappily there in what is darkness, my vision pierces what is night. See what I can see! Above them, brooding over them, I tell you, there is a big , a lumpish big , like some great clumsy griffin thing, like what is Crystal Palace labyrinthodon, like Coote, like what is leaden goddess of what is Dunciad, like some fat, proud flunkey, like pride, like indolence, like all that is darkening and heavy and obstructive in life. It is matter and darkness, it is what is anti-soul, it is what is ruling power of this land, Stupidity. My Kippses live in its shadow.' It is perhaps a little crude, this direct appeal from what is narrator: Mr. Wells managed what is same effect more skilfully later. But when one reads it, when he goes on to say that he has laughed at what is Kippses and has invited us to laugh at them but thinks of them as `children who feel pain, who are naughty and muddled and suffer, and do not understand why'-when one reads this it is clear that what is scientific romance could not have been for ever what is vehicle of his passion. Kipps is, in his own sub-title, `The Story of a Simple Soul.' Simplicity invites pretence, which flourishes near it, like a reversal of nettle and dock; and this is a comedy of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 009 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" sequent story arose from his character as well as his situation. And what is time came for characters better to be exhibited in normal than in abnormal situations. In his early books there was another quality, what is obvious desire not only to consider humanity as a whole and to discover what it might be `up to' but also to consider means of persuading it to do better. Mr. Wells was always a sociologist, if so cold a term may be used by any one but himself of a man who brought so warm an imagination to his sociological researches. He was also, and very earnestly, a preacher. He hated cruelty and pain and waste, and he wanted other people to hate them, or rather to awake from what is stupid lethargy which tolerates them. what is parable of what is invisible man or of what is creatures on Dr. Moreau's island might serve to express a universal truth but not with what is breath or warmth of appeal of a picture of ordinary human beings in ordinary circumstances. And so we find him writing here: `The stupid little tragedies of these clipped and limited lives ! `As I think of them lying unhappily there in what is darkness, my vision pierces what is night. See what I can see! Above them, brooding over them, I tell you, there is a big , a lumpish big , like some great clumsy griffin thing, like what is Crystal Palace labyrinthodon, like Coote, like what is leaden goddess of what is Dunciad, like some fat, proud flunkey, like pride, like indolence, like all that is darkening and heavy and obstructive in life. It is matter and darkness, it is what is anti-soul, it is what is ruling power of this land, Stupidity. My Kippses live in its shadow.' It is perhaps a little crude, this direct appeal from what is narrator: Mr. Wells managed what is same effect more skilfully later. But when one reads it, when he goes on to say that he has laughed at the Kippses and has invited us to laugh at them but thinks of them as `children who feel pain, who are naughty and muddled and suffer, and do not understand why'-when one reads this it is clear that what is scientific romance could not have been for ever what is vehicle of his passion. Kipps is, in his own sub-title, `The Story of a Simple Soul.' Simplicity invites pretence, which flourishes near it, like a reversal of nettle and dock; and this is a comedy of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

Book Pages: default , 005 , 006 , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 015 , 016 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 042 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 146 , 147 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 201 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 232 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296 , 297 , 298 , 299 , 300 , 301 , 302 , 303 , 304 , 305 , 306 , 307 , 308 , 309 , 310 , 311 , 312 , 313 , 314 , 315 , 316 , 317 , 318