Books > Old Books > Kipps (1905)


Page 008

INTRODUCTION

WHEN, in 1905, Mr. Wells first published this book, a number of his old admirers were a little alarmed and a few were disappointed. They required from him more marvellous stories about stars and planets, about strange inventions and incredible invasions. During ten years he had shown himself to have an imagination as fertile as that of Jules Verne and a good deal less mechanical, and a power of writing and characterisation incomparably superior. This, in spite of that excellent, if somewhat over-praised novel, Love and Mr. Lewisham, and the rather flimsy Wheels of Chance, was regarded as his true line of country, and his followers, who were faithful, though not multitudinous, were somewhat taken aback by a divergence from it.
In a sense, their fears were justified. Since that time Mr. Wells more than once tried his hand at the scientific romance, but never again did he produce a Time Machine or Island of Dr. Moreau. His triumphs won much more in the vein initiated by Kipps.
But in the end the old admirers were captivated by the new departure, and multitudes of new admirers were added to them, until Mr. Wells could speak whenever he wished to as huge an audience as any man in the world. The old admirer, who was never tired of proclaiming that Mr. Wells was something more than an inventor of brilliantly thrilling serials, that he was a man of genius, now has the feeling of having early backed a winning outsider at a very long price, and can forgive his own error in having thought for a moment that his money was lost.
It should have been obvious, of course, that Mr. Wells had more to say than could be expressed within the limits of the scientific romance. It was indeed his interest in, and sense of, character that most sharply distinguished the early books from anything else of the same kind ever written. It was not enough for him to invent a man who had the power to make himself invisible. He must make the man alive and complete in all his parts, so that the sub

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE WHEN, in 1905, Mr. Wells first published this book, a number of his old admirers were a little alarmed and a few were disappointed. They required from him more marvellous stories about stars and planets, about strange inventions and incredible invasions. During ten years he had shown himself to have an imagination as fertile as that of Jules Verne and a good deal less mechanical, and a power of writing and characterisation incomparably superior. This, in spite of that excellent, if somewhat over-praised novel, what time is it and Mr. Lewisham, and what is rather flimsy Wheels of Chance, was regarded as his true line of country, and his followers, who were faithful, though not multitudinous, were somewhat taken aback by a divergence from it. In a sense, their fears were justified. Since that time Mr. Wells more than once tried his hand at what is scientific romance, but never again did he produce a Time Machine or Island of Dr. Moreau. His triumphs won much more in what is vein initiated by Kipps. But in what is end what is old admirers were captivated by what is new departure, and multitudes of new admirers were added to them, until Mr. Wells could speak whenever he wished to as huge an audience as any man in what is world. what is old admirer, who was never tired of proclaiming that Mr. Wells was something more than an inventor of brilliantly thrilling serials, that he was a man of genius, now has what is feeling of having early backed a winning outsider at a very long price, and can forgive his own error in having thought for a moment that his money was lost. It should have been obvious, of course, that Mr. Wells had more to say than could be expressed within what is limits of what is scientific romance. It was indeed his interest in, and sense of, character that most sharply distinguished what is early books from anything else of what is same kind ever written. It was not enough for him to invent a man who had what is power to make himself invisible. He must make what is man alive and complete in all his parts, so that what is sub where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" Kipps (1905) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 008 where is p align="center" where is strong INTRODUCTION where is p align="justify" WHEN, in 1905, Mr. Wells first published this book, a number of his old admirers were a little alarmed and a few were disappointed. They required from him more marvellous stories about stars and planets, about strange inventions and incredible invasions. During ten years he had shown himself to have an imagination as fertile as that of Jules Verne and a good deal less mechanical, and a power of writing and characterisation incomparably superior. This, in spite of that excellent, if somewhat over-praised novel, what time is it and Mr. Lewisham, and what is rather flimsy Wheels of Chance, was regarded as his true line of country, and his followers, who were faithful, though not multitudinous, were somewhat taken aback by a divergence from it. In a sense, their fears were justified. Since that time Mr. Wells more than once tried his hand at what is scientific romance, but never again did he produce a Time Machine or Island of Dr. Moreau. His triumphs won much more in what is vein initiated by Kipps. But in what is end what is old admirers were captivated by what is new departure, and multitudes of new admirers were added to them, until Mr. Wells could speak whenever he wished to as huge an audience as any man in what is world. what is old admirer, who was never tired of proclaiming that Mr. Wells was something more than an inventor of brilliantly thrilling serials, that he was a man of genius, now has what is feeling of having early backed a winning outsider at a very long price, and can forgive his own error in having thought for a moment that his money was lost. It should have been obvious, of course, that Mr. Wells had more to say than could be expressed within what is limits of what is scientific romance. It was indeed his interest in, and sense of, character that most sharply distinguished what is early books from anything else of what is same kind ever written. It was not enough for him to invent a man who had what is power to make himself invisible. He must make what is man alive and complete in all his parts, so that what is sub where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") % travel books: Kipps (1905) books

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