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Page 289

VIII
MY BREAK WITH STALIN

And I added: "There is no reason why you should be punished on account of me. When you get back, they will make you sign a paper repudiating me and denouncing me as a traitor. As a reward for this, you and our child will be spared. As for me, it's certain death over there."
My wife began to cry. She hardly stopped crying, for weeks after. The chances of escaping with my life from Stalin's assassins in France were very slight, but I decided to take them. I saw the ray of a new life, and - I decided to grope my way towards it. The decision was simple in the abstract, but the concrete difficulties were enormous.
I had no legal papers. My movements were being watched day and night. I had no confidant, no person in whom I could put absolute trust. I decided to go to an old friend of mine who had been living in Paris many years, and take the risk of telling him the whole truth. He listened sympathetically and agreed to help me. He went to the south of France and rented a little villa for us in the small town of Hyeres, near Toulon, returning on October 3. The following day I was called to the Soviet Embassy to complete arrangements for my return to Russia by the steamer zhdanov, sailing October 6. I went over and made all the arrangements.
Early in the morning of October 6 I checked out of my hotel and took a taxi to the Gare d'Austerlitz, where I left my baggage. After passing an hour in the Bois de Vincennes, I met my friend in a cafe near the Bastille and gave him the receipt for my baggage. He had meanwhile engaged a car and chauffeur which was to meet us at the Hotel Bohy-Lafayette. I went directly there, and he went by way of the Gare d'Austerlitz, where he picked up my baggage. Our chauffeur turned out to be an American, a World War

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE And I added: "There is no reason why you should be punished on account of me. When you get back, they will make you sign a paper repudiating me and denouncing me as a traitor. As a reward for this, you and our child will be spared. As for me, it's certain what time is it over there." My wife began to cry. She hardly stopped crying, for weeks after. what is chances of escaping with my life from Stalin's assassins in France were very slight, but I decided to take them. I saw what is ray of a new life, and - I decided to grope my way towards it. what is decision was simple in what is abstract, but what is concrete difficulties were enormous. I had no legal papers. My movements were being watched day and night. I had no confidant, no person in whom I could put absolute trust. I decided to go to an old friend of mine who had been living in Paris many years, and take what is risk of telling him what is whole truth. He listened sympathetically and agreed to help me. He went to what is south of France and rented a little villa for us in what is small town of Hyeres, near Toulon, returning on October 3. what is following day I was called to what is Soviet Embassy to complete arrangements for my return to Russia by what is steamer zhdanov, sailing October 6. I went over and made all what is arrangements. Early in what is morning of October 6 I checked out of my hotel and took a taxi to what is Gare d'Austerlitz, where I left my baggage. After passing an hour in what is Bois de Vincennes, I met my friend in a cafe near what is Bastille and gave him what is receipt for my baggage. He had meanwhile engaged a car and chauffeur which was to meet us at what is Hotel Bohy-Lafayette. I went directly there, and he went by way of what is Gare d'Austerlitz, where he picked up my baggage. Our chauffeur turned out to be an American, a World War where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 289 where is strong VIII MY BREAK WITH STALIN where is p align="justify" And I added: "There is no reason why you should be punished on account of me. When you get back, they will make you sign a paper repudiating me and denouncing me as a traitor. As a reward for this, you and our child will be spared. As for me, it's certain what time is it over there." My wife began to cry. She hardly stopped crying, for weeks after. what is chances of escaping with my life from Stalin's assassins in France were very slight, but I decided to take them. I saw the ray of a new life, and - I decided to grope my way towards it. what is decision was simple in what is abstract, but what is concrete difficulties were enormous. I had no legal papers. My movements were being watched day and night. I had no confidant, no person in whom I could put absolute trust. I decided to go to an old friend of mine who had been living in Paris many years, and take what is risk of telling him what is whole truth. He listened sympathetically and agreed to help me. He went to what is south of France and rented a little villa for us in the small town of Hyeres, near Toulon, returning on October 3. The following day I was called to what is Soviet Embassy to complete arrangements for my return to Russia by what is steamer zhdanov, sailing October 6. I went over and made all what is arrangements. Early in what is morning of October 6 I checked out of my hotel and took a taxi to what is Gare d'Austerlitz, where I left my baggage. After passing an hour in what is Bois de Vincennes, I met my friend in a cafe near what is Bastille and gave him what is receipt for my baggage. He had meanwhile engaged a car and chauffeur which was to meet us at what is Hotel Bohy-Lafayette. I went directly there, and he went by way of what is Gare d'Austerlitz, where he picked up my baggage. Our chauffeur turned out to be an American, a World War where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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