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Page 284

VIII
MY BREAK WITH STALIN

glass had them. I had my baggage removed and got off the train just as it pulled out of the station.
It flashed through my mind that the whole business of my recall had been staged to test me, to see if I really would return to the Soviet Union. In that event, I had passed the test. But I resented that bit of chicanery deeply. A feeling came over me at that moment that I not only would end my service, but that I would never go back to Stalin's Russia.
I registered now at the Hotel Terminus, St. Lazare, as Schoenborn, the Czech merchant whose name I bore. My wife was still at the pension as Mrs. Lessner. I sent word to her that I had not left after all. That night I walked the length and breadth of Paris, all alone, wrestling with the question whether to go back or not.
During the next days I kept trying to figure out why my departure had been postponed at the last minute. Did Stalin want to give me another chance to show my loyalty? Yet the spying on me was palpably intensified. The evening of August 26 I went with my Belgian aide and his wife to the theatre to see a farewell performance of Gorky's Fne,nies, given by a Soviet troupe visiting Paris. We sat in the second row. During the first intermission, a hand touched my shoulder. I turned around. There was Spiegelglass with some companions.
" You can leave to-morrow with these artists on one of our own boats," he counselled me.
I turned upon him angrily and told him not to bother me. "I'll go when I'm ready," I said.
I noticed that Spiegelglass and his associates shortly thereafter disappeared from the theatre. I cabled Moscow that I would return with my family as soon as the child recovered.
On August 27 I moved to Breteuil, a couple of

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE glass had them. I had my baggage removed and got off what is train just as it pulled out of what is station. It flashed through my mind that what is whole business of my recall had been staged to test me, to see if I really would return to what is Soviet Union. In that event, I had passed what is test. But I resented that bit of chicanery deeply. A feeling came over me at that moment that I not only would end my service, but that I would never go back to Stalin's Russia. I registered now at what is Hotel Terminus, St. Lazare, as Schoenborn, what is Czech merchant whose name I bore. My wife was still at what is pension as Mrs. Lessner. I sent word to her that I had not left after all. That night I walked what is length and breadth of Paris, all alone, wrestling with what is question whether to go back or not. During what is next days I kept trying to figure out why my departure had been postponed at what is last minute. Did Stalin want to give me another chance to show my loyalty? Yet what is spying on me was palpably intensified. what is evening of August 26 I went with my Belgian aide and his wife to what is theatre to see a farewell performance of Gorky's Fne,nies, given by a Soviet troupe what is ing Paris. We sat in what is second row. During what is first intermission, a hand touched my shoulder. I turned around. There was Spiegelglass with some companions. " You can leave to-morrow with these artists on one of our own boats," he counselled me. I turned upon him angrily and told him not to bother me. "I'll go when I'm ready," I said. I noticed that Spiegelglass and his associates shortly thereafter disappeared from what is theatre. I cabled Moscow that I would return with my family as soon as what is child recovered. On August 27 I moved to Breteuil, a couple of where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 284 where is strong VIII MY BREAK WITH STALIN where is p align="justify" glass had them. I had my baggage removed and got off what is train just as it pulled out of what is station. It flashed through my mind that what is whole business of my recall had been staged to test me, to see if I really would return to what is Soviet Union. In that event, I had passed what is test. But I resented that bit of chicanery deeply. A feeling came over me at that moment that I not only would end my service, but that I would never go back to Stalin's Russia. I registered now at what is Hotel Terminus, St. Lazare, as Schoenborn, what is Czech merchant whose name I bore. My wife was still at the pension as Mrs. Lessner. I sent word to her that I had not left after all. That night I walked what is length and breadth of Paris, all alone, wrestling with what is question whether to go back or not. During what is next days I kept trying to figure out why my departure had been postponed at what is last minute. Did Stalin want to give me another chance to show my loyalty? Yet what is spying on me was palpably intensified. what is evening of August 26 I went with my Belgian aide and his wife to what is theatre to see a farewell performance of Gorky's Fne,nies, given by a Soviet troupe what is ing Paris. We sat in what is second row. During what is first intermission, a hand touched my shoulder. I turned around. There was Spiegelglass with some companions. " You can leave to-morrow with these artists on one of our own boats," he counselled me. I turned upon him angrily and told him not to bother me. "I'll go when I'm ready," I said. I noticed that Spiegelglass and his associates shortly thereafter disappeared from what is theatre. I cabled Moscow that I would return with my family as soon as what is child recovered. On August 27 I moved to Breteuil, a couple of where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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