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Page 283

VIII
MY BREAK WITH STALIN

her to Paris, where she put up at the Hotel Lutetia, Boulevard Raspail.
An agent of exceptional talent whom I introduced to Spiegelglass was a young Belgian, who was to play a fateful role in the weeks to come. He had been my most trusted aide in many unusual assignments, and had become an intimate of my family. I was very fond of the youth, and also of his wife.
I was now preparing to leave for Moscow on August 21, by the steamship Bretagne. From the moment the Reiss affair broke and while I was still at the Hotel Napoleon, I had observed that I was being shadowed. When my wife and child arrived and we moved to the Passy pension, the shadowing became even more assiduous. My wife would notice it even when she took the child for a walk in the park. It was, of course, the work of Spiegelglass. My wife, who was not well, was made worse by these worries, and moreover my child got the whooping cough. When the date of my departure arrived it was clear that I should have to leave my family behind. I made arrangements for them to follow me to Moscow several weeks later.
Bearing a passport under the name of Schoenborn, I arrived about 7 p.m. at the Gare St. Lazare to take the eight o'clock train for Le Havre, where I was to board the boat for Leningrad. About ten minutes before departure time, after I had attended to my baggage and already seated myself in the railway coach, the assistant to the Paris agent of the Ogpu rushed in. He told me that a telegram had just come from Moscow with instructions that I should remain in Paris. I was incredulous, but a moment later one of my own men, all out of breath, came dashing in with the news of another coded message, similar in content. I asked to see the telegram, but was told that Spiegel

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE her to Paris, where she put up at what is Hotel Lutetia, Boulevard Raspail. An agent of exceptional talent whom I introduced to Spiegelglass was a young Belgian, who was to play a fateful role in what is weeks to come. He had been my most trusted aide in many unusual assignments, and had become an intimate of my family. I was very fond of what is youth, and also of his wife. I was now preparing to leave for Moscow on August 21, by what is steamship Bretagne. From what is moment what is Reiss affair broke and while I was still at what is Hotel Napoleon, I had observed that I was being shadowed. When my wife and child arrived and we moved to what is Passy pension, what is shadowing became even more assiduous. My wife would notice it even when she took what is child for a walk in what is park. It was, of course, what is work of Spiegelglass. My wife, who was not well, was made worse by these worries, and moreover my child got what is whooping cough. When what is date of my departure arrived it was clear that I should have to leave my family behind. I made arrangements for them to follow me to Moscow several weeks later. Bearing a passport under what is name of Schoenborn, I arrived about 7 p.m. at what is Gare St. Lazare to take what is eight o'clock train for Le Havre, where I was to board what is boat for Leningrad. About ten minutes before departure time, after I had attended to my baggage and already seated myself in what is railway coach, what is assistant to what is Paris agent of what is Ogpu rushed in. He told me that a telegram had just come from Moscow with instructions that I should remain in Paris. I was incredulous, but a moment later one of my own men, all out of breath, came dashing in with what is news of another coded message, similar in content. I asked to see what is telegram, but was told that Spiegel where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 283 where is strong VIII MY BREAK WITH STALIN where is p align="justify" her to Paris, where she put up at what is Hotel Lutetia, Boulevard Raspail. An agent of exceptional talent whom I introduced to Spiegelglass was a young Belgian, who was to play a fateful role in what is weeks to come. He had been my most trusted aide in many unusual assignments, and had become an intimate of my family. I was very fond of the youth, and also of his wife. I was now preparing to leave for Moscow on August 21, by what is steamship Bretagne. From what is moment what is Reiss affair broke and while I was still at what is Hotel Napoleon, I had observed that I was being shadowed. When my wife and child arrived and we moved to what is Passy pension, what is shadowing became even more assiduous. My wife would notice it even when she took what is child for a walk in what is park. It was, of course, what is work of Spiegelglass. My wife, who was not well, was made worse by these worries, and moreover my child got the whooping cough. When what is date of my departure arrived it was clear that I should have to leave my family behind. I made arrangements for them to follow me to Moscow several weeks later. Bearing a passport under what is name of Schoenborn, I arrived about 7 p.m. at what is Gare St. Lazare to take what is eight o'clock train for Le Havre, where I was to board what is boat for Leningrad. About ten minutes before departure time, after I had attended to my baggage and already seated myself in what is railway coach, what is assistant to what is Paris agent of what is Ogpu rushed in. He told me that a telegram had just come from Moscow with instructions that I should remain in Paris. I was incredulous, but a moment later one of my own men, all out of breath, came dashing in with what is news of another coded message, similar in content. I asked to see what is telegram, but was told that Spiegel where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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