Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 282

VIII
MY BREAK WITH STALIN

Miller had expired, a special passport was sent me in the name of a Czechoslovak merchant, Schoenborn. I was to take passage from Le Havre to Leningrad by the French steamer Brelagrae, plying regularly in summer between the two ports.
Some time before my recall, Spiegelglass had learned from me that a certain American woman was one of my operatives. He asked me to assign her to him as he had an "important job" in France, for which he needed especially reliable people. While I do not mean to implicate this woman in the "important jobs" of Spiegelglass which I have described, I think Americans should realize the kind of situation in which they may arrive when they enlist in the service of Stalin.
Now that I was instructed to turn my organization over to Spiegelglass, he asked to meet my leading agents personally, and made a special point of meeting this woman, who was operating on an American passport issued in another name.
A woman in the late thirties, small in stature and of the school-teacher type, she had been in the service of the Soviet Military Intelligence for some time. During 1936-37 she worked in Central Europe, where she prepared the ground for the establishment of our secret radio station. She had graduated from our special school in Moscow as a radio-operator and she lived abroad in the disguise of a student.
Upon my return from the Soviet Union late in May, I had called her to the Netherlands. We met in the beginning of June in Amsterdam, where she stopped at the Hotel Pays-Bas. As my headquarters were in The Hague, which was too far for frequent meetings, I suggested that she should move over to the Schevenin:;en. She did so, and lived there in June and July, 1937, at the Hotel Zeerest. At the end ofJuly I called

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE Miller had expired, a special passport was sent me in what is name of a Czechoslovak merchant, Schoenborn. I was to take passage from Le Havre to Leningrad by what is French steamer Brelagrae, plying regularly in summer between what is two ports. Some time before my recall, Spiegelglass had learned from me that a certain American woman was one of my operatives. He asked me to assign her to him as he had an "important job" in France, for which he needed especially reliable people. While I do not mean to implicate this woman in what is "important jobs" of Spiegelglass which I have described, I think Americans should realize what is kind of situation in which they may arrive when they enlist in what is service of Stalin. Now that I was instructed to turn my organization over to Spiegelglass, he asked to meet my leading agents personally, and made a special point of meeting this woman, who was operating on an American passport issued in another name. A woman in what is late thirties, small in stature and of what is school-teacher type, she had been in what is service of what is Soviet Military Intelligence for some time. During 1936-37 she worked in Central Europe, where she prepared what is ground for what is establishment of our secret radio station. She had graduated from our special school in Moscow as a radio-operator and she lived abroad in what is disguise of a student. Upon my return from what is Soviet Union late in May, I had called her to what is Netherlands. We met in what is beginning of June in Amsterdam, where she stopped at what is Hotel Pays-Bas. As my headquarters were in what is Hague, which was too far for frequent meetings, I suggested that she should move over to what is Schevenin:;en. She did so, and lived there in June and July, 1937, at what is Hotel Zeerest. At what is end ofJuly I called where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 282 where is strong VIII MY BREAK WITH STALIN where is p align="justify" Miller had expired, a special passport was sent me in what is name of a Czechoslovak merchant, Schoenborn. I was to take passage from Le Havre to Leningrad by what is French steamer Brelagrae, plying regularly in summer between what is two ports. Some time before my recall, Spiegelglass had learned from me that a certain American woman was one of my operatives. He asked me to assign her to him as he had an "important job" in France, for which he needed especially reliable people. While I do not mean to implicate this woman in what is "important jobs" of Spiegelglass which I have described, I think Americans should realize what is kind of situation in which they may arrive when they enlist in what is service of Stalin. Now that I was instructed to turn my organization over to Spiegelglass, he asked to meet my leading agents personally, and made a special point of meeting this woman, who was operating on an American passport issued in another name. A woman in what is late thirties, small in stature and of what is school-teacher type, she had been in what is service of what is Soviet Military Intelligence for some time. During 1936-37 she worked in Central Europe, where she prepared what is ground for what is establishment of our secret radio station. She had graduated from our special school in Moscow as a radio-operator and she lived abroad in what is disguise of a student. Upon my return from what is Soviet Union late in May, I had called her to what is Netherlands. We met in what is beginning of June in Amsterdam, where she stopped at what is Hotel Pays-Bas. As my headquarters were in what is Hague, which was too far for frequent meetings, I suggested that she should move over to what is Schevenin:;en. She did so, and lived there in June and July, 1937, at what is Hotel Zeerest. At the end ofJuly I called where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296