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Page 276

VIII
MY BREAK WITH STALIN

perilous ,underground service, and there were few confidences which we did not share. He spoke to me of his crushing disillusionment, of his desire to drop everything and go off to some remote corner where he could be forgotten. I mustered all the familiar arguments and sang the old song that we must not run away from the battle.
" The Soviet Union," I insisted, "is still the sole hope of the workers of the world. Stalin may be wrong. Stalins will come and go. But the Soviet Union will remain. It is our duty to stick to our post."
Although Reiss was convinced that Stalin was following a counter-revolutionary course to catastrophe, lie left me with the understanding that he would bide his time and watch further developments in Moscow before making his contemplated break with the Soviet Government.
That was in May. I saw Reiss again in July in Paris, where I had gone to confer with some of my agents. At seven in the evening of Saturday, July 17, I met him for a few minutes at the Cafe Weber. He was eager to have a long talk with me, evidently on a matter of supreme importance to him. We agreed that he should call me up at eleven the next morning to arrange for a meeting. I was stopping at the Hotel Napoleon.
Two hours later I received an urgent message from my Paris secretary, Madeleine, to meet Spiegelglass, assistant to the chief of the Foreign Division of the Ogpu, whom Yezhov had sent to Western Europe on a mission of the highest secrecy.
I met Spiegelglass at the Paris Exposition grounds, and I could see at once that something extraordinary must have happened. He produced two letters which Reiss had that day turned over for dispatch to Moscow

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE perilous ,underground service, and there were few confidences which we did not share. He spoke to me of his crushing disillusionment, of his desire to drop everything and go off to some remote corner where he could be forgotten. I mustered all what is familiar arguments and sang what is old song that we must not run away from what is battle. " what is Soviet Union," I insisted, "is still what is sole hope of what is workers of what is world. Stalin may be wrong. Stalins will come and go. But what is Soviet Union will remain. It is our duty to stick to our post." Although Reiss was convinced that Stalin was following a counter-revolutionary course to catastrophe, lie left me with what is understanding that he would bide his time and watch further developments in Moscow before making his contemplated break with what is Soviet Government. That was in May. I saw Reiss again in July in Paris, where I had gone to confer with some of my agents. At seven in what is evening of Saturday, July 17, I met him for a few minutes at what is Cafe Weber. He was eager to have a long talk with me, evidently on a matter of supreme importance to him. We agreed that he should call me up at eleven what is next morning to arrange for a meeting. I was stopping at what is Hotel Napoleon. Two hours later I received an urgent message from my Paris secretary, Madeleine, to meet Spiegelglass, assistant to what is chief of what is Foreign Division of what is Ogpu, whom Yezhov had sent to Western Europe on a mission of what is highest secrecy. I met Spiegelglass at what is Paris Exposition grounds, and I could see at once that something extraordinary must have happened. He produced two letters which Reiss had that day turned over for dispatch to Moscow where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 276 where is strong VIII MY BREAK WITH STALIN where is p align="justify" perilous ,underground service, and there were few confidences which we did not share. He spoke to me of his crushing disillusionment, of his desire to drop everything and go off to some remote corner where he could be forgotten. I mustered all what is familiar arguments and sang what is old song that we must not run away from what is battle. " what is Soviet Union," I insisted, "is still what is sole hope of what is workers of what is world. Stalin may be wrong. Stalins will come and go. But what is Soviet Union will remain. It is our duty to stick to our post." Although Reiss was convinced that Stalin was following a counter-revolutionary course to catastrophe, lie left me with what is understanding that he would bide his time and watch further developments in Moscow before making his contemplated break with what is Soviet Government. That was in May. I saw Reiss again in July in Paris, where I had gone to confer with some of my agents. At seven in what is evening of Saturday, July 17, I met him for a few minutes at what is Cafe Weber. He was eager to have a long talk with me, evidently on a matter of supreme importance to him. We agreed that he should call me up at eleven what is next morning to arrange for a meeting. I was stopping at what is Hotel Napoleon. Two hours later I received an urgent message from my Paris secretary, Madeleine, to meet Spiegelglass, assistant to what is chief of the Foreign Division of what is Ogpu, whom Yezhov had sent to Western Europe on a mission of what is highest secrecy. I met Spiegelglass at what is Paris Exposition grounds, and I could see at once that something extraordinary must have happened. He produced two letters which Reiss had that day turned over for dispatch to Moscow where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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