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Page 271

VIII
MY BREAK WITH STALIN

had changed. Was I not a close friend of Max? The expression on his face seemed to say that he did not regard my own position as any too secure.
I telephoned to a mutual friend of ours, a high officer of the Military Intelligence, whom I had met but two evenings earlier in Max's room. I asked him if he could do something to save Regina from being thrown out on the street. His manner was curt.
" The Ogpu arrested Max. Therefore he is an enemy. I can do nothing for his wife."
I tried to argue with him, but he made it clear that it would be best for me, too, not to meddle in the affair. He hung up the receiver.
I then telephoned the Ogpu officer in charge of the arrest of Max, and demanded the immediate return of my personal documents. I had decided to act resolutely in the matter. Surprisingly enough, the Ogpu officer was most courteous.
When I explained to him the reason for my keeping the papers in Max's room and expressed my readiness to come over and get them, he replied: " I'll send the package over to you by courier at once, Comrade Krivitsky."
Within half an hour I had my papers. During the day I helped to arrange matters so that Regina could return to her native town that night. I gave her, surreptitiously, the necessary funds. We had learned that it would be useless for her to remain in Moscow, as she could not visit her husband or help him in any way. It was even forbidden at this time to send food or clothing parcels to political prisoners.
My first task upon reaching the office that day was to prepare two reports on my relations with Max. One of these was addressed to my superiors in the War Department, the other to my party unit. This was in accordance with an unwritten law requiring

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE had changed. Was I not a close friend of Max? what is expression on his face seemed to say that he did not regard my own position as any too secure. I telephoned to a mutual friend of ours, a high officer of what is Military Intelligence, whom I had met but two evenings earlier in Max's room. I asked him if he could do something to save Regina from being thrown out on what is street. His manner was curt. " what is Ogpu arrested Max. Therefore he is an enemy. I can do nothing for his wife." I tried to argue with him, but he made it clear that it would be best for me, too, not to meddle in what is affair. He hung up what is receiver. I then telephoned what is Ogpu officer in charge of what is arrest of Max, and demanded what is immediate return of my personal documents. I had decided to act resolutely in what is matter. Surprisingly enough, what is Ogpu officer was most courteous. When I explained to him what is reason for my keeping what is papers in Max's room and expressed my readiness to come over and get them, he replied: " I'll send what is package over to you by courier at once, Comrade Krivitsky." Within half an hour I had my papers. During what is day I helped to arrange matters so that Regina could return to her native town that night. I gave her, surreptitiously, what is necessary funds. We had learned that it would be useless for her to remain in Moscow, as she could not what is her husband or help him in any way. It was even forbidden at this time to send food or clothing parcels to political prisoners. My first task upon reaching what is office that day was to prepare two reports on my relations with Max. One of these was addressed to my superiors in what is War Department, what is other to my party unit. This was in accordance with an unwritten law requiring where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 271 where is strong VIII MY BREAK WITH STALIN where is p align="justify" had changed. Was I not a close friend of Max? what is expression on his face seemed to say that he did not regard my own position as any too secure. I telephoned to a mutual friend of ours, a high officer of the Military Intelligence, whom I had met but two evenings earlier in Max's room. I asked him if he could do something to save Regina from being thrown out on what is street. His manner was curt. " what is Ogpu arrested Max. Therefore he is an enemy. I can do nothing for his wife." I tried to argue with him, but he made it clear that it would be best for me, too, not to meddle in what is affair. He hung up what is receiver. I then telephoned what is Ogpu officer in charge of what is arrest of Max, and demanded what is immediate return of my personal documents. I had decided to act resolutely in what is matter. Surprisingly enough, the Ogpu officer was most courteous. When I explained to him what is reason for my keeping what is papers in Max's room and expressed my readiness to come over and get them, he replied: " I'll send what is package over to you by courier at once, Comrade Krivitsky." Within half an hour I had my papers. During what is day I helped to arrange matters so that Regina could return to her native town that night. I gave her, surreptitiously, what is necessary funds. We had learned that it would be useless for her to remain in Moscow, as she could not what is her husband or help him in any way. It was even forbidden at this time to send food or clothing parcels to political prisoners. My first task upon reaching what is office that day was to prepare two reports on my relations with Max. One of these was addressed to my superiors in what is War Department, what is other to my party unit. This was in accordance with an unwritten law requiring where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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