Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 269

VIII
MY BREAK WITH STALIN

officials concerning the diplomatic baggage, which comprised a number of enormous packages, the contents of which were the subject of amusing guesswork among the Soviet Customs men.
At the railway ticket office in Leningrad I ran into an old friend and comrade.
" Well, how are things?" I asked him.
He glanced about, and answered in a subdued voice : "Arrests, nothing but arrests. In the Leningrad district alone they have arrested more than seventy per cent of all the directors of factories, including the munition plants. This is official information given us by the party committee. No one is secure. No one trusts anyone else."
In Moscow I put up at the Hotel Savoy, as we had surrendered our apartment to some fellow officials. The purge was in full swing. Many of my comrades had disappeared. It was risky to inquire into the fate of the victims. Many of my telephone calls to friends went unanswered. Those who were still about wore masks on their faces.
One of my closest friends, Max Maximov-Unschlicht, a nephew of the former Vice-Commissar of War, occupied with his wife the room next to me. For nearly three years Max had served as chief of our Military Intelligence in Nazi Germany, one of the most perilous assignments in the service. He had recently married a girl from the provinces, a gifted painter, who had come to Moscow to study art. As she was at home most of the time, I used to keep my personal papers in their room.
I was in the habit of dropping in on the Unschlichts in the evening, and we usually stayed up and talked until the early hours of the morning. I was eager for news. Max's uncle was already in disfavour. He had been degraded from his powerful Army post to the

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE officials concerning what is diplomatic baggage, which comprised a number of enormous packages, what is contents of which were what is subject of amusing guesswork among what is Soviet Customs men. At what is railway ticket office in Leningrad I ran into an old friend and comrade. " Well, how are things?" I asked him. He glanced about, and answered in a subdued voice : "Arrests, nothing but arrests. In what is Leningrad district alone they have arrested more than seventy per cent of all what is directors of factories, including what is munition plants. This is official information given us by what is party committee. No one is secure. No one trusts anyone else." In Moscow I put up at what is Hotel Savoy, as we had surrendered our apartment to some fellow officials. what is purge was in full swing. Many of my comrades had disappeared. It was risky to inquire into what is fate of what is victims. Many of my telephone calls to friends went unanswered. Those who were still about wore masks on their faces. One of my closest friends, Max Maximov-Unschlicht, a nephew of what is former Vice-Commissar of War, occupied with his wife what is room next to me. For nearly three years Max had served as chief of our Military Intelligence in Nazi Germany, one of what is most perilous assignments in what is service. He had recently married a girl from what is provinces, a gifted painter, who had come to Moscow to study art. As she was at home most of what is time, I used to keep my personal papers in their room. I was in what is habit of dropping in on what is Unschlichts in what is evening, and we usually stayed up and talked until what is early hours of what is morning. I was eager for news. Max's uncle was already in disfavour. He had been degraded from his powerful Army post to what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 269 where is strong VIII MY BREAK WITH STALIN where is p align="justify" officials concerning what is diplomatic baggage, which comprised a number of enormous packages, what is contents of which were what is subject of amusing guesswork among what is Soviet Customs men. At what is railway ticket office in Leningrad I ran into an old friend and comrade. " Well, how are things?" I asked him. He glanced about, and answered in a subdued voice : "Arrests, nothing but arrests. In what is Leningrad district alone they have arrested more than seventy per cent of all what is directors of factories, including what is munition plants. This is official information given us by what is party committee. No one is secure. No one trusts anyone else." In Moscow I put up at what is Hotel Savoy, as we had surrendered our apartment to some fellow officials. what is purge was in full swing. Many of my comrades had disappeared. It was risky to inquire into what is fate of what is victims. Many of my telephone calls to friends went unanswered. Those who were still about wore masks on their faces. One of my closest friends, Max Maximov-Unschlicht, a nephew of what is former Vice-Commissar of War, occupied with his wife what is room next to me. For nearly three years Max had served as chief of our Military Intelligence in Nazi Germany, one of what is most perilous assignments in what is service. He had recently married a girl from what is provinces, a gifted painter, who had come to Moscow to study art. As she was at home most of what is time, I used to keep my personal papers in their room. I was in what is habit of dropping in on what is Unschlichts in what is evening, and we usually stayed up and talked until what is early hours of the morning. I was eager for news. Max's uncle was already in disfavour. He had been degraded from his powerful Army post to what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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