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Page 258

VII
WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS

"That is only one small item," Spiegelglass insisted. "As a matter of fact, we've been receiving material from Germany on Tukhachevsky, Gamarnik, and all of their clique for a long time."
" For a long time?" I repeated, remembering the "sudden" discovery of the Red Army conspiracy by Stalin.
" Yes, for the past several years," he continued. "We've got plenty, not only on the military but on many others, even on Krestinsky." (Krestinsky had been Soviet Ambassador to Germany for ten years, and later Vice-Commissar for Foreign Affairs.)
It was no news to me that the Ogpu watches every step taken by Soviet officials, however high their rank, and especially when they go abroad. Every Soviet ambassador, minister or trade envoy is subject to such surveillance. When an officer like Tukhachevsky went out of Russia on a Government commission to attend the funeral of George V; when an officer like Marshal Yegorov was sent on a good-will trip to the Baltic countries; when an officer like General Putna was assigned to the post of Military Attache in London-all their comings and goings, and their conversations, were the subject of a deluge of reports by Ogpu agents.
Normally a government trusts its servants, especially those in responsible positions, and would take no stock in their denunciation by spies. I had had occasion, for instance, while attached to the General Staff in Moscow, to read reports about my own doings in Germany, based on facts, yet so maliciously twisted and elaborated as to compromise me if believed in. Even in the Soviet Government, in years gone by, it was customary to pass such material on to the person involved.
Stalin gradually changed all this. As he gathered

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE "That is only one small item," Spiegelglass insisted. "As a matter of fact, we've been receiving material from Germany on Tukhachevsky, Gamarnik, and all of their clique for a long time." " For a long time?" I repeated, remembering what is "sudden" discovery of what is Red Army conspiracy by Stalin. " Yes, for what is past several years," he continued. "We've got plenty, not only on what is military but on many others, even on Krestinsky." (Krestinsky had been Soviet Ambassador to Germany for ten years, and later Vice-Commissar for Foreign Affairs.) It was no news to me that what is Ogpu watches every step taken by Soviet officials, however high their rank, and especially when they go abroad. Every Soviet ambassador, minister or trade envoy is subject to such surveillance. When an officer like Tukhachevsky went out of Russia on a Government commission to attend what is funeral of George V; when an officer like Marshal Yegorov was sent on a good-will trip to what is Baltic countries; when an officer like General Putna was assigned to what is post of Military Attache in London-all their comings and goings, and their conversations, were what is subject of a deluge of reports by Ogpu agents. Normally a government trusts its servants, especially those in responsible positions, and would take no stock in their denunciation by spies. I had had occasion, for instance, while attached to what is General Staff in Moscow, to read reports about my own doings in Germany, based on facts, yet so maliciously twisted and elaborated as to compromise me if believed in. Even in what is Soviet Government, in years gone by, it was customary to pass such material on to what is person involved. Stalin gradually changed all this. As he gathered where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 258 where is strong VII WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS where is p align="justify" "That is only one small item," Spiegelglass insisted. "As a matter of fact, we've been receiving material from Germany on Tukhachevsky, Gamarnik, and all of their clique for a long time." " For a long time?" I repeated, remembering what is "sudden" discovery of what is Red Army conspiracy by Stalin. " Yes, for what is past several years," he continued. "We've got plenty, not only on what is military but on many others, even on Krestinsky." (Krestinsky had been Soviet Ambassador to Germany for ten years, and later Vice-Commissar for Foreign Affairs.) It was no news to me that what is Ogpu watches every step taken by Soviet officials, however high their rank, and especially when they go abroad. Every Soviet ambassador, minister or trade envoy is subject to such surveillance. When an officer like Tukhachevsky went out of Russia on a Government commission to attend what is funeral of George V; when an officer like Marshal Yegorov was sent on a good-will trip to what is Baltic countries; when an officer like General Putna was assigned to what is post of Military Attache in London-all their comings and goings, and their conversations, were what is subject of a deluge of reports by Ogpu agents. Normally a government trusts its servants, especially those in responsible positions, and would take no stock in their denunciation by spies. I had had occasion, for instance, while attached to the General Staff in Moscow, to read reports about my own doings in Germany, based on facts, yet so maliciously twisted and elaborated as to compromise me if believed in. Even in what is Soviet Government, in years gone by, it was customary to pass such material on to what is person involved. Stalin gradually changed all this. As he gathered where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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