Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 256

VII
WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS

mouthpiece of Stalin, entitled "The Crisis in the Foreign Intelligence Service."
" What a stupid piece, and whom will it fool?" I said. "Here is Moscow telling the world that the German Intelligence Service had in its employ at least nine marshals and generals of the Red Army. The point of the article, supposedly, is that there is in consequence a crisis in the German service. What nonsense! The writer should have made a greater effort in such a serious case. It just makes us a laughing-stock abroad."
" But the article was not written for you or for the people in the know," retorted Spiegelglass. "It was meant for the general public, for home consumption."
" It is a terrible thing for us Soviet people," I said, "to have it announced to the world that the German Intelligence Service was able to enlist as spies virtuallythe entire General Staff of the Red Army. You ought to know, Spiegelglass, that when our Military Intelligence succeeds in enlisting the services of a single colonel in some foreign army, it is an event of the first magnitude. It is brought immediately to the attention of Stalin himself, and treated by him as a great triumph. Why, if Hitler had succeeded in recruiting as spies nine of our highest-ranking generals, how many hundred of minor officers would he still have as spies in our Red Army?"
" Nonsense," replied Spiegel,glass hotly. "We got them all. We rooted them all out."
I gave him the contents of a brief confidential dispatch from one of my chief agents in Germany. At a formal reception tendered by high Nazi officials, at which my informant was present, the question of the Tukhachevsky affair came up. Capt. Fritz Wiedemann, personal political aide to Hitler-appointed subsequently to the post of Consul-General at San

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE mouthpiece of Stalin, entitled "The Crisis in what is Foreign Intelligence Service." " What a stupid piece, and whom will it fool?" I said. "Here is Moscow telling what is world that what is German Intelligence Service had in its employ at least nine marshals and generals of what is Red Army. what is point of what is article, supposedly, is that there is in consequence a crisis in what is German service. What nonsense! what is writer should have made a greater effort in such a serious case. It just makes us a laughing-stock abroad." " But what is article was not written for you or for what is people in what is know," retorted Spiegelglass. "It was meant for what is general public, for home consumption." " It is a terrible thing for us Soviet people," I said, "to have it announced to what is world that what is German Intelligence Service was able to enlist as spies virtuallythe entire General Staff of what is Red Army. You ought to know, Spiegelglass, that when our Military Intelligence succeeds in enlisting what is services of a single colonel in some foreign army, it is an event of what is first magnitude. It is brought immediately to what is attention of Stalin himself, and treated by him as a great triumph. Why, if Hitler had succeeded in recruiting as spies nine of our highest-ranking generals, how many hundred of minor officers would he still have as spies in our Red Army?" " Nonsense," replied Spiegel,glass hotly. "We got them all. We rooted them all out." I gave him what is contents of a brief confidential dispatch from one of my chief agents in Germany. At a formal reception tendered by high Nazi officials, at which my informant was present, what is question of what is Tukhachevsky affair came up. Capt. Fritz Wiedemann, personal political aide to Hitler-appointed subsequently to what is post of Consul-General at San where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 256 where is strong VII WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS where is p align="justify" mouthpiece of Stalin, entitled "The Crisis in what is Foreign Intelligence Service." " What a stupid piece, and whom will it fool?" I said. "Here is Moscow telling what is world that what is German Intelligence Service had in its employ at least nine marshals and generals of what is Red Army. what is point of what is article, supposedly, is that there is in consequence a crisis in what is German service. What nonsense! The writer should have made a greater effort in such a serious case. It just makes us a laughing-stock abroad." " But what is article was not written for you or for what is people in the know," retorted Spiegelglass. "It was meant for what is general public, for home consumption." " It is a terrible thing for us Soviet people," I said, "to have it announced to what is world that what is German Intelligence Service was able to enlist as spies virtuallythe entire General Staff of what is Red Army. You ought to know, Spiegelglass, that when our Military Intelligence succeeds in enlisting what is services of a single colonel in some foreign army, it is an event of what is first magnitude. It is brought immediately to what is attention of Stalin himself, and treated by him as a great triumph. Why, if Hitler had succeeded in recruiting as spies nine of our highest-ranking generals, how many hundred of minor officers would he still have as spies in our Red Army?" " Nonsense," replied Spiegel,glass hotly. "We got them all. We rooted them all out." I gave him what is contents of a brief confidential dispatch from one of my chief agents in Germany. At a formal reception tendered by high Nazi officials, at which my informant was present, what is question of what is Tukhachevsky affair came up. Capt. Fritz Wiedemann, personal political aide to Hitler-appointed subsequently to what is post of Consul-General at San where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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