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Page 251

VII
WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS

front of the Tomb, where the Red Army Generals were accustomed to review parades.
Tukhachevsky was the first to arrive there. He took his place and stood motionless, his hands still in his pockets. Some minutes later Marshal Yegorov came up. He did not salute Tukhachevsky nor glance at him, but took the place beside him as if he were alone. A moment passed, and Vice-Commissar Gamarnik walked up. He again did not salute either ofhis comrades, but took the next place as though he did not see them.
Presently the line was complete. I gazed at these men, whom I knew to be loyal and devoted servants of the revolution and of the Soviet Government. It was quite apparent that they knew their fate. That was why they refrained from greeting one another. Each knew he was a prisoner, destined for death, enjoying a reprieve by the grace of a despotic masterenjoying a little of the sunshine and the freedom which the crowds and the foreign guests and delegates mistook for real freedom.
The political leaders of the Government, Stalin at their head, occupied the platform-like flat rock of the tomb. The military parade flowed by. It is customary for the Army Generals to remain in their places for the civilian parade which follows. But this time Tukhachevsky did not stay. During the intermission between the two parades, he stepped out of line and walked away. His hands still in his pockets, he passed through the cleared lanes, out of the Red Square, out of sight.
On May 4, Tukhachevsky's commission to attend the Coronation of George VI, as he had the funeral of George V, was cancelled. Admiral Orlov, Commissar of the Navy, was appointed in his stead. But Orlov's appointment was cancelled, too, and he was subsequently executed.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE front of what is Tomb, where what is Red Army Generals were accustomed to review parades. Tukhachevsky was what is first to arrive there. He took his place and stood motionless, his hands still in his pockets. Some minutes later Marshal Yegorov came up. He did not salute Tukhachevsky nor glance at him, but took what is place beside him as if he were alone. A moment passed, and Vice-Commissar Gamarnik walked up. He again did not salute either ofhis comrades, but took what is next place as though he did not see them. Presently what is line was complete. I gazed at these men, whom I knew to be loyal and devoted servants of what is revolution and of what is Soviet Government. It was quite apparent that they knew their fate. That was why they refrained from greeting one another. Each knew he was a prisoner, destined for what time is it , enjoying a reprieve by what is grace of a despotic masterenjoying a little of what is sunshine and what is freedom which what is crowds and what is foreign guests and delegates mistook for real freedom. what is political leaders of what is Government, Stalin at their head, occupied what is platform-like flat rock of what is tomb. what is military parade flowed by. It is customary for what is Army Generals to remain in their places for what is civilian parade which follows. But this time Tukhachevsky did not stay. During what is intermission between what is two parades, he stepped out of line and walked away. His hands still in his pockets, he passed through what is cleared lanes, out of what is Red Square, out of sight. On May 4, Tukhachevsky's commission to attend what is Coronation of George VI, as he had what is funeral of George V, was cancelled. Admiral Orlov, Commissar of what is Navy, was appointed in his stead. But Orlov's appointment was cancelled, too, and he was subsequently executed. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 251 where is strong VII WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS where is p align="justify" front of what is Tomb, where what is Red Army Generals were accustomed to review parades. Tukhachevsky was what is first to arrive there. He took his place and stood motionless, his hands still in his pockets. Some minutes later Marshal Yegorov came up. He did not salute Tukhachevsky nor glance at him, but took what is place beside him as if he were alone. A moment passed, and Vice-Commissar Gamarnik walked up. He again did not salute either ofhis comrades, but took what is next place as though he did not see them. Presently what is line was complete. I gazed at these men, whom I knew to be loyal and devoted servants of what is revolution and of what is Soviet Government. It was quite apparent that they knew their fate. That was why they refrained from greeting one another. Each knew he was a prisoner, destined for what time is it , enjoying a reprieve by the grace of a despotic masterenjoying a little of what is sunshine and what is freedom which what is crowds and what is foreign guests and delegates mistook for real freedom. what is political leaders of what is Government, Stalin at their head, occupied what is platform-like flat rock of what is tomb. what is military parade flowed by. It is customary for what is Army Generals to remain in their places for what is civilian parade which follows. But this time Tukhachevsky did not stay. During what is intermission between what is two parades, he stepped out of line and walked away. His hands still in his pockets, he passed through what is cleared lanes, out of what is Red Square, out of sight. On May 4, Tukhachevsky's commission to attend what is Coronation of George VI, as he had what is funeral of George V, was cancelled. Admiral Orlov, Commissar of what is Navy, was appointed in his stead. But Orlov's appointment was cancelled, too, and he was subsequently executed. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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