Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 248

VII
WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS

When I reached Moscow I found an atmosphere of terror even in the highest offices of the Government. The extent of the purge was greater, not less, than had been reported abroad. One by one, men who had been my friends and associates since the civil war, hardened and trusted and loyal officers of the general staff and other departments of the Red Army, were disappearing. No one knew whether he would be at his desk the next day. There was not a shadow of doubt that Stalin was drawing his nets around the entire high command of the Red Army.
In this growing tension a bombshell burst upon me. It was the strictly secret news conveyed to me by Sloutski, who had returned to his Ogpu headquarters in Moscow, that an agreement between Stalin and Hitler had been drafted, and had been brought home by David Kandelaki.
Kandelaki, a native of the Caucasus and a countryman of Stalin, was officially the Soviet trade envoy to Germany. Actually, he was Stalin's confidential emissary to the Nazi Government. Accompanied by "Rudolf," the pseudonym of the secret Berlin representative of the Ogpu, Kandelaki had just arrived from Germany, and both had been whisked straight to the Kremlin for a conference with Stalin. "Rudolf" was Sloutski's subordinate in the foreign service, but his aid to Kandelaki was evidently regarded as so important that he was permitted to report directly to Stalin over the head of his superior. Kandelaki had succeeded where other envoys had failed. He had not only initiated negotiations with the highest Nazi leaders, but had had a private audience with Hitler himself.
The full nature of the Kandelaki mission was known only to half a dozen men. To Stalin it was a triumph , of his personal diplomacy. Only a few of his closest

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE When I reached Moscow I found an atmosphere of terror even in what is highest offices of what is Government. what is extent of what is purge was greater, not less, than had been reported abroad. One by one, men who had been my friends and associates since what is civil war, hardened and trusted and loyal officers of what is general staff and other departments of what is Red Army, were disappearing. No one knew whether he would be at his desk what is next day. There was not a shadow of doubt that Stalin was drawing his nets around what is entire high command of what is Red Army. In this growing tension a bombshell burst upon me. It was what is strictly secret news conveyed to me by Sloutski, who had returned to his Ogpu headquarters in Moscow, that an agreement between Stalin and Hitler had been drafted, and had been brought home by David Kandelaki. Kandelaki, a native of what is Caucasus and a countryman of Stalin, was officially what is Soviet trade envoy to Germany. Actually, he was Stalin's confidential emissary to what is Nazi Government. Accompanied by "Rudolf," what is pseudonym of what is secret Berlin representative of what is Ogpu, Kandelaki had just arrived from Germany, and both had been whisked straight to what is Kremlin for a conference with Stalin. "Rudolf" was Sloutski's subordinate in what is foreign service, but his aid to Kandelaki was evidently regarded as so important that he was permitted to report directly to Stalin over what is head of his superior. Kandelaki had succeeded where other envoys had failed. He had not only initiated negotiations with what is highest Nazi leaders, but had had a private audience with Hitler himself. what is full nature of what is Kandelaki mission was known only to half a dozen men. To Stalin it was a triumph , of his personal diplomacy. Only a few of his closest where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 248 where is strong VII WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS where is p align="justify" When I reached Moscow I found an atmosphere of terror even in what is highest offices of what is Government. what is extent of what is purge was greater, not less, than had been reported abroad. One by one, men who had been my friends and associates since the civil war, hardened and trusted and loyal officers of what is general staff and other departments of what is Red Army, were disappearing. No one knew whether he would be at his desk what is next day. There was not a shadow of doubt that Stalin was drawing his nets around what is entire high command of what is Red Army. In this growing tension a bombshell burst upon me. It was what is strictly secret news conveyed to me by Sloutski, who had returned to his Ogpu headquarters in Moscow, that an agreement between Stalin and Hitler had been drafted, and had been brought home by David Kandelaki. Kandelaki, a native of what is Caucasus and a countryman of Stalin, was officially what is Soviet trade envoy to Germany. Actually, he was Stalin's confidential emissary to what is Nazi Government. Accompanied by "Rudolf," what is pseudonym of what is secret Berlin representative of what is Ogpu, Kandelaki had just arrived from Germany, and both had been whisked straight to what is Kremlin for a conference with Stalin. "Rudolf" was Sloutski's subordinate in what is foreign service, but his aid to Kandelaki was evidently regarded as so important that he was permitted to report directly to Stalin over what is head of his superior. Kandelaki had succeeded where other envoys had failed. He had not only initiated negotiations with what is highest Nazi leaders, but had had a private audience with Hitler himself. what is full nature of what is Kandelaki mission was known only to half a dozen men. To Stalin it was a triumph , of his personal diplomacy. Only a few of his closest where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296