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Page 247

VII
WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS

generals, the building of a powerful army and system of national defence, had preserved their morale.
Stalin knew that Tukhachevsky, Gamarnik, Yakir, Uborevich and the other ranking generals could never be broken into the state of unquestioning obedience which he now required of all those about him. They were men of great personal courage, and he remembered, during the days when his own prestige was at its lowest point, these generals, especially Tukhachevsky, had enjoyed enormous popularity not only with the officers' corps and the rank and file of the army, but with the people. He remembered too that at every critical stage of his rule-forcible collectivization, hunger, rebellion-the generals had supported him reluctantly, had put difficulties in his path, had forced deals upon him. He felt no certainty that now -confronted with his abrupt change of international policy-they would continue to recognize his totalitarian authority.
These were my reflections, and I wondered how Stalin would engineer the "liquidation" of his generals.
Reports soon began to reach me from Moscow indicating the progressive isolation, not only of Tukhachevsky but of several other generals. Many of their closest aides were being arrested. The circle of Stalin men around Tukhachevsky was being narrowed inch by inch. It began to be clear that even his unique record and position could not save him.
In March, 1937, I went to Moscow, ostensibly to confer with Yezhov on an exceptionally confidential matter. The effect of the two treason trials of old Bolsheviks had been to shake the faith of pro-Soviet elements abroad. The sweep of Stalin's purge was increasing daily, and it was working havoc in Western Europe.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE generals, what is building of a powerful army and system of national defence, had preserved their morale. Stalin knew that Tukhachevsky, Gamarnik, Yakir, Uborevich and what is other ranking generals could never be broken into what is state of unquestioning obedience which he now required of all those about him. They were men of great personal courage, and he remembered, during what is days when his own prestige was at its lowest point, these generals, especially Tukhachevsky, had enjoyed enormous popularity not only with what is officers' corps and what is rank and file of what is army, but with what is people. He remembered too that at every critical stage of his rule-forcible collectivization, hunger, rebellion-the generals had supported him reluctantly, had put difficulties in his path, had forced deals upon him. He felt no certainty that now -confronted with his abrupt change of international policy-they would continue to recognize his totalitarian authority. These were my reflections, and I wondered how Stalin would engineer what is "liquidation" of his generals. Reports soon began to reach me from Moscow indicating what is progressive isolation, not only of Tukhachevsky but of several other generals. Many of their closest aides were being arrested. what is circle of Stalin men around Tukhachevsky was being narrowed inch by inch. It began to be clear that even his unique record and position could not save him. In March, 1937, I went to Moscow, ostensibly to confer with Yezhov on an exceptionally confidential matter. what is effect of what is two treason trials of old Bolsheviks had been to shake what is faith of pro-Soviet elements abroad. what is sweep of Stalin's purge was increasing daily, and it was working havoc in Western Europe. where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 247 where is strong VII WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS where is p align="justify" generals, what is building of a powerful army and system of national defence, had preserved their morale. Stalin knew that Tukhachevsky, Gamarnik, Yakir, Uborevich and the other ranking generals could never be broken into what is state of unquestioning obedience which he now required of all those about him. They were men of great personal courage, and he remembered, during what is days when his own prestige was at its lowest point, these generals, especially Tukhachevsky, had enjoyed enormous popularity not only with what is officers' corps and what is rank and file of the army, but with what is people. He remembered too that at every critical stage of his rule-forcible collectivization, hunger, rebellion-the generals had supported him reluctantly, had put difficulties in his path, had forced deals upon him. He felt no certainty that now -confronted with his abrupt change of international policy-they would continue to recognize his totalitarian authority. These were my reflections, and I wondered how Stalin would engineer what is "liquidation" of his generals. Reports soon began to reach me from Moscow indicating what is progressive isolation, not only of Tukhachevsky but of several other generals. Many of their closest aides were being arrested. what is circle of Stalin men around Tukhachevsky was being narrowed inch by inch. It began to be clear that even his unique record and position could not save him. In March, 1937, I went to Moscow, ostensibly to confer with Yezhov on an exceptionally confidential matter. what is effect of what is two treason trials of old Bolsheviks had been to shake what is faith of pro-Soviet elements abroad. what is sweep of Stalin's purge was increasing daily, and it was working havoc in Western Europe. where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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