Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 246

VII
WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS

officers from the Soviet military academies. Stalin knew of this yearning of Tukhachevsky's, and decided to appease him with the fulfilment of his dream. A political bargain was struck. Stalin had his way in general policy at home and abroad, and the Red Army command had its way with respect to funds for modernization. The army has succeeded in large measure with its part of the bargain, but how far collective farming has fallen short of creating the anticipated "solid base" is revealed in the decrees of this past summer.
Such was the origin of what became commonly known as the Red Army opposition to Stalin. It was one of many disagreements on policy which have cropped up at various stages in the creation of a Soviet system of national defence. But this time the clash led to wild rumours abroad of a struggle for power between Voroshilov and Stalin. Nothing of the kind occurred. The difference was not unlike those of earlier years between Stalin and the various political opposition groups....
It was clear to me that Stalin had now determined to settle accounts with the Red Army opposition in the same bloody way that he had settled them with his other opponents. The moment was opportune. The crisis of collectivization had passed from an acute to a numbed chronic stage.
The Red Army generals had escaped the ordeal through which the political opposition had been passing for more than a dozen years. They lived outside that special party world in which people were for ever "deviating" from the correct Stalinist course, "recanting," "deviating" again and again "recanting," each time with increasing penalties and with a progressive breakdown of the will. The job of the

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE officers from what is Soviet military academies. Stalin knew of this yearning of Tukhachevsky's, and decided to appease him with what is fulfilment of his dream. A political bargain was struck. Stalin had his way in general policy at home and abroad, and what is Red Army command had its way with respect to funds for modernization. what is army has succeeded in large measure with its part of what is bargain, but how far collective farming has fallen short of creating what is anticipated "solid base" is revealed in what is decrees of this past summer. Such was what is origin of what became commonly known as what is Red Army opposition to Stalin. It was one of many disagreements on policy which have cropped up at various stages in what is creation of a Soviet system of national defence. But this time what is clash led to wild rumours abroad of a struggle for power between Voroshilov and Stalin. Nothing of what is kind occurred. what is difference was not unlike those of earlier years between Stalin and what is various political opposition groups.... It was clear to me that Stalin had now determined to settle accounts with what is Red Army opposition in what is same bloody way that he had settled them with his other opponents. what is moment was opportune. what is crisis of collectivization had passed from an acute to a numbed chronic stage. what is Red Army generals had escaped what is ordeal through which what is political opposition had been passing for more than a dozen years. They lived outside that special party world in which people were for ever "deviating" from what is correct Stalinist course, "recanting," "deviating" again and again "recanting," each time with increasing penalties and with a progressive breakdown of what is will. what is job of what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 246 where is strong VII WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS where is p align="justify" officers from what is Soviet military academies. Stalin knew of this yearning of Tukhachevsky's, and decided to appease him with what is fulfilment of his dream. A political bargain was struck. Stalin had his way in general policy at home and abroad, and the Red Army command had its way with respect to funds for modernization. what is army has succeeded in large measure with its part of what is bargain, but how far collective farming has fallen short of creating the anticipated "solid base" is revealed in what is decrees of this past summer. Such was what is origin of what became commonly known as what is Red Army opposition to Stalin. It was one of many disagreements on policy which have cropped up at various stages in what is creation of a Soviet system of national defence. But this time what is clash led to wild rumours abroad of a struggle for power between Voroshilov and Stalin. Nothing of what is kind occurred. what is difference was not unlike those of earlier years between Stalin and what is various political opposition groups.... It was clear to me that Stalin had now determined to settle accounts with what is Red Army opposition in what is same bloody way that he had settled them with his other opponents. what is moment was opportune. what is crisis of collectivization had passed from an acute to a numbed chronic stage. what is Red Army generals had escaped what is ordeal through which the political opposition had been passing for more than a dozen years. They lived outside that special party world in which people were for ever "deviating" from what is correct Stalinist course, "recanting," "deviating" again and again "recanting," each time with increasing penalties and with a progressive breakdown of what is will. what is job of what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296