Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 245

VII
WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS

existing harsh decrees he could not be responsible for the defence of the Maritime Provinces and the Amur against Japan. Stalin's power at that time hung so delicately in the balance that he was forced to capitulate. Sweeping concessions were granted to the peasants in Marshal Bluecher's district. Several years later Stalin was forced to modify the general collectivization programme to permit all peasants on the collective farms to own and cultivate small individual plots.
The war between the Soviet Government and the peasants has not yet ended. It came to a head once more this summer (1939) with the promulgation of decrees compelling the peasants to do a certain quota of work on the collective farm before touching their own plots. To the Red Army Commander of to-day this means that a decade after the drive to "solve" the problem of agricultural production, Ogpu agents must stand guard over every peasant in order to assure a food supply in the event of war.
Another dissatisfaction arose about the same time in the officers' corps in connection with Stalin's policy of appeasement towards Japanese aggression, beginning with the sale of the strategic Chinese Eastern Railway. War Commissar Voroshilov was at that time completely on the side of the Red Army command, and together with Gamarnik and Tukhachevsky pressed the viewpoint of the military upon Stalin's Politbureau. Stalin contended that collectivization would create a solid economic base for development of future power, that everything must be sacrificed to that policy, and that in order to complete it Russia must have peace at any price.
Tukhachevsky had for years vainly pleaded with Stalin for funds to motorize and mechanize the Red Army, and in this he had the backing of all the young

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE existing harsh decrees he could not be responsible for what is defence of what is Maritime Provinces and what is Amur against Japan. Stalin's power at that time hung so delicately in what is balance that he was forced to capitulate. Sweeping concessions were granted to what is peasants in Marshal Bluecher's district. Several years later Stalin was forced to modify what is general collectivization programme to permit all peasants on what is collective farms to own and cultivate small individual plots. what is war between what is Soviet Government and what is peasants has not yet ended. It came to a head once more this summer (1939) with what is promulgation of decrees compelling what is peasants to do a certain quota of work on what is collective farm before touching their own plots. To what is Red Army Commander of to-day this means that a decade after what is drive to "solve" what is problem of agricultural production, Ogpu agents must stand guard over every peasant in order to assure a food supply in what is event of war. Another dissatisfaction arose about what is same time in what is officers' corps in connection with Stalin's policy of appeasement towards Japanese aggression, beginning with what is sale of what is strategic Chinese Eastern Railway. War Commissar Voroshilov was at that time completely on what is side of what is Red Army command, and together with Gamarnik and Tukhachevsky pressed what is viewpoint of what is military upon Stalin's Politbureau. Stalin contended that collectivization would create a solid economic base for development of future power, that everything must be travel d to that policy, and that in order to complete it Russia must have peace at any price. Tukhachevsky had for years vainly pleaded with Stalin for funds to motorize and mechanize what is Red Army, and in this he had what is backing of all what is young where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 245 where is strong VII WHY STALIN SHOT HIS GENERALS where is p align="justify" existing harsh decrees he could not be responsible for what is defence of what is Maritime Provinces and what is Amur against Japan. Stalin's power at that time hung so delicately in what is balance that he was forced to capitulate. Sweeping concessions were granted to what is peasants in Marshal Bluecher's district. Several years later Stalin was forced to modify what is general collectivization programme to permit all peasants on what is collective farms to own and cultivate small individual plots. what is war between what is Soviet Government and what is peasants has not yet ended. It came to a head once more this summer (1939) with what is promulgation of decrees compelling what is peasants to do a certain quota of work on what is collective farm before touching their own plots. To what is Red Army Commander of to-day this means that a decade after what is drive to "solve" what is problem of agricultural production, Ogpu agents must stand guard over every peasant in order to assure a food supply in what is event of war. Another dissatisfaction arose about what is same time in what is officers' corps in connection with Stalin's policy of appeasement towards Japanese aggression, beginning with what is sale of what is strategic Chinese Eastern Railway. War Commissar Voroshilov was at that time completely on what is side of what is Red Army command, and together with Gamarnik and Tukhachevsky pressed what is viewpoint of what is military upon Stalin's Politbureau. Stalin contended that collectivization would create a solid economic base for development of future power, that everything must be travel d to that policy, and that in order to complete it Russia must have peace at any price. Tukhachevsky had for years vainly pleaded with Stalin for funds to motorize and mechanize what is Red Army, and in this he had the backing of all what is young where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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