Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 231

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WHY DID THEY CONFESS?

another batch of eight outstanding Bolshevik leaders, headed by Yenukidze, who had been one of Stalin's mentors in his youth, and who had held high office in the Soviet Government for eighteen years, were executed without confessions, after a third alleged secret trial.
The last "treason trial" to date, the BukharinRykov-Yagoda case, was staged in March 1939, and comprised twenty-one men. It took a year to wrest confessions from them. Three of this batch received commutation of sentence. The charges in this show trial ranged from plotting the assassination of Kirov and the poisoning of Maxim Gorky to being Hitler spies. The self-vilification of the confessors reached depths hitherto unplumbed. The world was dumbfounded by the rivalry between the confessors and the prosecution in asserting the guilt of the accused.
In each trial there was competition among the defendants in self-vilification, in confessing to more sins and crimes. Each successive trial increased this seemingly insane procedure.
A great many people imagine that the victims were trying, by the fantastic extremes to which they went, to get themselves picked for that small group on which Stalin would confer clemency. It may be that, as they outdid the incomparable Prosecutor Vyshinsky in the make-believe, some of them had that faint hope. But I doubt it, because they all knew Stalin. They all knew Stalin's scornful words to his old colleague Bukharin in that fateful meeting at the Kremlin: "That is not the way revolutionists defend themselves."
As an old member of the Bolshevik Party, I believe that, weakened and tortured into confessions though they had been, they nevertheless hoped by the very fantastic vehemence of their confessions to make it

Page 232

VI
WHY DID THEY CONFESS?

obvious that these were, like everything else in the show trials, political acts. They wanted to make known to the world and to history that, up to the hour of their death, they were still engaved in a political struggle, that they were "confession" to crimes against the party in a last desperate effort to be of service to it.
Persons to whom I have confided this belief say that it is incomprehensible to the Western mind. Nevertheless, I am firmly certain of its truth. I know the quality of the old Bolsheviks, their devotion to the cause, their recognition of the blind alley at which Bolshevism had arrived, their knowledge of Stalin.

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE another batch of eight outstanding Bolshevik leaders, headed by Yenukidze, who had been one of Stalin's mentors in his youth, and who had held high office in what is Soviet Government for eighteen years, were executed without confessions, after a third alleged secret trial. what is last "treason trial" to date, what is BukharinRykov-Yagoda case, was staged in March 1939, and comprised twenty-one men. It took a year to wrest confessions from them. Three of this batch received commutation of sentence. what is charges in this show trial ranged from plotting what is assassination of Kirov and what is poisoning of Maxim Gorky to being Hitler spies. what is self-vilification of what is confessors reached depths hitherto unplumbed. what is world was dumbfounded by what is rivalry between what is confessors and what is prosecution in asserting what is guilt of what is accused. In each trial there was competition among what is defendants in self-vilification, in confessing to more sins and crimes. Each successive trial increased this seemingly insane procedure. A great many people imagine that what is victims were trying, by what is fantastic extremes to which they went, to get themselves picked for that small group on which Stalin would confer clemency. It may be that, as they outdid what is incomparable Prosecutor Vyshinsky in what is make-believe, some of them had that faint hope. But I doubt it, because they all knew Stalin. They all knew Stalin's scornful words to his old colleague Bukharin in that fateful meeting at what is Kremlin: "That is not what is way revolutionists defend themselves." As an old member of what is Bolshevik Party, I believe that, weakened and tortured into confessions though they had been, they nevertheless hoped by what is very fantastic vehemence of their confessions to make it where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 231 where is strong VI WHY DID THEY CONFESS? where is p align="justify" another batch of eight outstanding Bolshevik leaders, headed by Yenukidze, who had been one of Stalin's mentors in his youth, and who had held high office in what is Soviet Government for eighteen years, were executed without confessions, after a third alleged secret trial. what is last "treason trial" to date, what is BukharinRykov-Yagoda case, was staged in March 1939, and comprised twenty-one men. It took a year to wrest confessions from them. Three of this batch received commutation of sentence. what is charges in this show trial ranged from plotting what is assassination of Kirov and what is poisoning of Maxim Gorky to being Hitler spies. what is self-vilification of what is confessors reached depths hitherto unplumbed. what is world was dumbfounded by what is rivalry between what is confessors and what is prosecution in asserting what is guilt of what is accused. In each trial there was competition among what is defendants in self-vilification, in confessing to more sins and crimes. Each successive trial increased this seemingly insane procedure. A great many people imagine that what is victims were trying, by the fantastic extremes to which they went, to get themselves picked for that small group on which Stalin would confer clemency. It may be that, as they outdid what is incomparable Prosecutor Vyshinsky in what is make-believe, some of them had that faint hope. But I doubt it, because they all knew Stalin. They all knew Stalin's scornful words to his old colleague Bukharin in that fateful meeting at what is Kremlin: "That is not what is way revolutionists defend themselves." As an old member of what is Bolshevik Party, I believe that, weakened and tortured into confessions though they had been, they nevertheless hoped by what is very fantastic vehemence of their confessions to make it where is p align="left" Page 232 where is strong VI WHY DID THEY CONFESS? where is p align="justify" obvious that these were, like everything else in what is show trials, political acts. They wanted to make known to what is world and to history that, up to what is hour of their what time is it , they were still engaved in a political struggle, that they were "confession" to crimes against what is party in a last desperate effort to be of service to it. Persons to whom I have confided this belief say that it is incomprehensible to what is Western mind. 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