Books > Old Books > I Was Stalin's Agent (1940)


Page 229

VI
WHY DID THEY CONFESS?

The assembly burst into wild shouts: " Shoot the traitor ! Back to gaol with him!"
Stalin was given an ovation, as Bukharin and Rykov, broken and weeping, were taken back to the prison by the Ogpu agents in trim military uniforms.
The two prisoners had misunderstood the occasion. In Stalin's view, this was their opportunity to demonstrate their loyalty to the party by confessing their past errors and glorifying his leadership. Instead of doing this, they had appealed over his head to the assembly, attempting to justify themselves before their former comrades who were now nothing but puppets of Stalin.
The behaviour of the Central Committee proved to the prisoners how absolute was the power of Stalin. It strengthened their conviction that against Stalin there was no "way out." Bukharin and Rykov had failed to deal with the dictator on his own terms, and there were no others. Like Louis XIV, who said "The state-it is I," Stalin had assumed the position, "The party-it is I." They had consecrated their lives to the service of the party, and they saw that there was no way left to serve it-and so keep up the illusion that they were serving the revolution-except to do the bidding of Stalin.
That is the basic explanation of the confessions. But all the other factors I have mentioned played their parts in bringing fifty-four of these old Bolsheviks to the point of so humiliating a service. There is one other factor which I have not mentioned, because I think it played only a small role. With most of them it played no role at all. That is the faint hope that not only their families and their political followers, but even they themselves might be spared if they "confessed." On the eve of the first trial, the

travel books:
where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE The assembly burst into wild shouts: " Shoot what is traitor ! Back to gaol with him!" Stalin was given an ovation, as Bukharin and Rykov, broken and weeping, were taken back to what is prison by what is Ogpu agents in trim military uniforms. what is two prisoners had misunderstood what is occasion. In Stalin's view, this was their opportunity to bad spirit strate their loyalty to what is party by confessing their past errors and glorifying his leadership. Instead of doing this, they had appealed over his head to what is assembly, attempting to justify themselves before their former comrades who were now nothing but puppets of Stalin. what is behaviour of what is Central Committee proved to what is prisoners how absolute was what is power of Stalin. It strengthened their conviction that against Stalin there was no "way out." Bukharin and Rykov had failed to deal with what is dictator on his own terms, and there were no others. Like Louis XIV, who said "The state-it is I," Stalin had assumed what is position, "The party-it is I." They had consecrated their lives to what is service of what is party, and they saw that there was no way left to serve it-and so keep up what is illusion that they were serving what is revolution-except to do what is bidding of Stalin. That is what is basic explanation of what is confessions. But all what is other factors I have mentioned played their parts in bringing fifty-four of these old Bolsheviks to what is point of so humiliating a service. There is one other factor which I have not mentioned, because I think it played only a small role. With most of them it played no role at all. That is what is faint hope that not only their families and their political followers, but even they themselves might be spared if they "confessed." On what is eve of what is first trial, what is where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 229 where is strong VI WHY DID THEY CONFESS? where is p align="justify" The assembly burst into wild shouts: " Shoot what is traitor ! Back to gaol with him!" Stalin was given an ovation, as Bukharin and Rykov, broken and weeping, were taken back to what is prison by what is Ogpu agents in trim military uniforms. what is two prisoners had misunderstood what is occasion. In Stalin's view, this was their opportunity to bad spirit strate their loyalty to the party by confessing their past errors and glorifying his leadership. Instead of doing this, they had appealed over his head to what is assembly, attempting to justify themselves before their former comrades who were now nothing but puppets of Stalin. what is behaviour of what is Central Committee proved to what is prisoners how absolute was what is power of Stalin. It strengthened their conviction that against Stalin there was no "way out." Bukharin and Rykov had failed to deal with what is dictator on his own terms, and there were no others. Like Louis XIV, who said "The state-it is I," Stalin had assumed what is position, "The party-it is I." They had consecrated their lives to what is service of what is party, and they saw that there was no way left to serve it-and so keep up what is illusion that they were serving what is revolution-except to do what is bidding of Stalin. That is what is basic explanation of what is confessions. But all what is other factors I have mentioned played their parts in bringing fifty-four of these old Bolsheviks to what is point of so humiliating a service. There is one other factor which I have not mentioned, because I think it played only a small role. With most of them it played no role at all. That is what is faint hope that not only their families and their political followers, but even they themselves might be spared if they "confessed." On what is eve of what is first trial, what is where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

Book Pages: default , 007 , 008 , 009 , 010 , 011 , 012 , 013 , 014 , 015 , 017 , 018 , 019 , 020 , 021 , 022 , 023 , 024 , 025 , 026 , 027 , 028 , 029 , 030 , 031 , 032 , 033 , 034 , 035 , 036 , 037 , 038 , 039 , 040 , 041 , 043 , 044 , 045 , 046 , 047 , 048 , 049 , 050 , 051 , 052 , 053 , 054 , 055 , 056 , 057 , 058 , 059 , 060 , 061 , 062 , 063 , 064 , 065 , 066 , 067 , 068 , 069 , 070 , 071 , 072 , 073 , 074 , 075 , 076 , 077 , 078 , 079 , 080 , 081 , 082 , 083 , 084 , 085 , 086 , 087 , 088 , 089 , 090 , 091 , 092 , 093 , 094 , 095 , 096 , 097 , 098 , 099 , 100 , 101 , 102 , 103 , 104 , 105 , 106 , 107 , 108 , 109 , 110 , 111 , 112 , 113 , 114 , 115 , 116 , 117 , 118 , 119 , 120 , 121 , 122 , 123 , 124 , 125 , 126 , 127 , 128 , 129 , 130 , 131 , 132 , 133 , 134 , 135 , 136 , 137 , 138 , 139 , 140 , 141 , 142 , 143 , 144 , 145 , 148 , 149 , 150 , 151 , 152 , 153 , 154 , 155 , 156 , 157 , 158 , 159 , 160 , 161 , 162 , 163 , 164 , 165 , 166 , 167 , 168 , 169 , 170 , 171 , 172 , 173 , 174 , 175 , 176 , 177 , 178 , 179 , 180 , 181 , 182 , 183 , 184 , 185 , 186 , 187 , 188 , 189 , 190 , 191 , 192 , 193 , 194 , 195 , 196 , 197 , 198 , 199 , 200 , 202 , 203 , 204 , 205 , 206 , 207 , 208 , 209 , 210 , 211 , 212 , 213 , 214 , 215 , 216 , 217 , 218 , 219 , 220 , 221 , 222 , 223 , 224 , 225 , 226 , 227 , 228 , 229 , 230 , 231 , 233 , 234 , 235 , 236 , 237 , 238 , 239 , 240 , 241 , 242 , 243 , 244 , 245 , 246 , 247 , 248 , 249 , 250 , 251 , 252 , 253 , 254 , 255 , 256 , 257 , 258 , 259 , 260 , 261 , 262 , 263 , 264 , 265 , 266 , 267 , 268 , 269 , 270 , 271 , 272 , 273 , 274 , 275 , 276 , 277 , 278 , 279 , 280 , 281 , 282 , 283 , 284 , 285 , 286 , 287 , 288 , 289 , 290 , 291 , 292 , 293 , 294 , 295 , 296