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Page 228

VI
WHY DID THEY CONFESS?

his head in the direction of the pack attacking him. He spoke but a few words, quietly, as if saying them to himself:
" What a pity I didn't arrest all of you before, when I had the power."
That was all Yagoda said. A hurricane of mocking words swept the hall. The seventy howling party chieftains knew that Yagoda might have had their confessions, had he arrested them six months earlier. Yagoda resumed his mask.
Two prisoners were led into the hall by uniformed Ogpu agents. One of them was Nikolai Bukharin, former President of the Communist International. The other was Alexei Rykov, Lenin's successor as Soviet Premier. Shabbily dressed, wan and exhausted, they took their seats among the well-clothed and wellfed Stalinist henchmen, who edged away from them in confusion and astonishment.
Stalin had staged this appearance before the Central Committee to prove his "democratic" treatment of these two great figures in Soviet history, these founders of the Bolshevik Party. But the meeting was now in Stalin's complete control. Bukharin rose to speak. In a broken voice he assured his comrades that he had never taken part in a conspiracy against Stalin or the Soviet Government. Resolutely he repudiated the very suspicion of such acts on his part. He wept. He pleaded. It was clear that he and Rykov had hoped to arouse a spark of the old comradeship in the Central Committee of the party which they had helped to create. But the comrades remained prudently silent. They preferred to wait for Stalin's word. And Stalin spoke, interrupting Bukharin :
" That is not the way revolutionists defend themselves! " he exclaimed. " If you are innocent you can prove it in a prison cell!"

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE his head in what is direction of what is pack attacking him. He spoke but a few words, quietly, as if saying them to himself: " What a pity I didn't arrest all of you before, when I had what is power." That was all Yagoda said. A hurricane of mocking words swept what is hall. what is seventy howling party chieftains knew that Yagoda might have had their confessions, had he arrested them six months earlier. Yagoda resumed his mask. Two prisoners were led into what is hall by uniformed Ogpu agents. One of them was Nikolai Bukharin, former President of what is Communist International. what is other was Alexei Rykov, Lenin's successor as Soviet Premier. Shabbily dressed, wan and exhausted, they took their seats among what is well-clothed and wellfed Stalinist henchmen, who edged away from them in confusion and astonishment. Stalin had staged this appearance before what is Central Committee to prove his "democratic" treatment of these two great figures in Soviet history, these founders of what is Bolshevik Party. But what is meeting was now in Stalin's complete control. Bukharin rose to speak. In a broken voice he assured his comrades that he had never taken part in a conspiracy against Stalin or what is Soviet Government. Resolutely he repudiated what is very suspicion of such acts on his part. He wept. He pleaded. It was clear that he and Rykov had hoped to arouse a spark of what is old comradeship in what is Central Committee of what is party which they had helped to create. But what is comrades remained prudently silent. They preferred to wait for Stalin's word. And Stalin spoke, interrupting Bukharin : " That is not what is way revolutionists defend themselves! " he exclaimed. " If you are innocent you can prove it in a prison cell!" where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 228 where is strong VI WHY DID THEY CONFESS? where is p align="justify" his head in what is direction of what is pack attacking him. He spoke but a few words, quietly, as if saying them to himself: " What a pity I didn't arrest all of you before, when I had what is power." That was all Yagoda said. A hurricane of mocking words swept the hall. what is seventy howling party chieftains knew that Yagoda might have had their confessions, had he arrested them six months earlier. Yagoda resumed his mask. Two prisoners were led into what is hall by uniformed Ogpu agents. One of them was Nikolai Bukharin, former President of what is Communist International. what is other was Alexei Rykov, Lenin's successor as Soviet Premier. Shabbily dressed, wan and exhausted, they took their seats among what is well-clothed and wellfed Stalinist henchmen, who edged away from them in confusion and astonishment. Stalin had staged this appearance before what is Central Committee to prove his "democratic" treatment of these two great figures in Soviet history, these founders of what is Bolshevik Party. But what is meeting was now in Stalin's complete control. Bukharin rose to speak. In a broken voice he assured his comrades that he had never taken part in a conspiracy against Stalin or what is Soviet Government. Resolutely he repudiated what is very suspicion of such acts on his part. He wept. He pleaded. It was clear that he and Rykov had hoped to arouse a spark of what is old comradeship in the Central Committee of what is party which they had helped to create. But what is comrades remained prudently silent. They preferred to wait for Stalin's word. And Stalin spoke, interrupting Bukharin : " That is not what is way revolutionists defend themselves! " he exclaimed. " If you are innocent you can prove it in a prison cell!" where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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