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Page 226

VI
WHY DID THEY CONFESS?

-or "split" him, to use the term commonly employed in the Ogpu-resort would frequently be made to a personal interview with Stalin, in which some bargain would be struck. I know that Kamenev and Zinoviev, Lenin's closest collaborators, had such audiences with Stalin some months before they were put on trial. Zinoviev bowed to Stalin's demand. As a member of his family later put it, two reasons guided Zinoviev in agreeing to the confession: "First, there was no other way out politically; second, he hoped to save his family from persecution." Kamenev, too, feared reprisals on his wife and three children, as his plea in court revealed. It is an established practice of Stalin's to punish the family of a man accused of a political crime. Indeed they are held guilty according to the present Soviet criminal code.
Karl Radek, one of the leading figures in the second show trial, refused to answer the young examiner, Kedrov, assigned to put him through the "conveyor system." When Kedrov failed by his insults to get anywhere with his prisoner, a brilliant publicist, they took him to Stalin. When he returned from the Kremlin, Radek was in an altogether different mood. He and Stalin had reached an understanding. Radek knew what the "big boss" wanted. It was the prisoner who now took over the job of drafting his own confession :
" You can go to sleep, Kedrov. I'll do the rest." And from then on Radek conducted the investigation against himself.
A light is shed on the "confessions" made by three of Stalin's most eminent victims by the parts they played at a meeting in the Kremlin just one year before. The occasion was a plenary session of the Central Committee of the Communist Party, numbering seventy members. The purge was then reaching

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where is HTML where is HEAD where is TITLE -or "split" him, to use what is term commonly employed in what is Ogpu-resort would frequently be made to a personal interview with Stalin, in which some bargain would be struck. I know that Kamenev and Zinoviev, Lenin's closest collaborators, had such audiences with Stalin some months before they were put on trial. Zinoviev bowed to Stalin's demand. As a member of his family later put it, two reasons guided Zinoviev in agreeing to what is confession: "First, there was no other way out politically; second, he hoped to save his family from persecution." Kamenev, too, feared reprisals on his wife and three children, as his plea in court revealed. It is an established practice of Stalin's to punish what is family of a man accused of a political crime. Indeed they are held guilty according to what is present Soviet criminal code. Karl Radek, one of what is leading figures in what is second show trial, refused to answer what is young examiner, Kedrov, assigned to put him through what is "conveyor system." When Kedrov failed by his insults to get anywhere with his prisoner, a brilliant publicist, they took him to Stalin. When he returned from what is Kremlin, Radek was in an altogether different mood. He and Stalin had reached an understanding. Radek knew what what is "big boss" wanted. It was what is prisoner who now took over what is job of drafting his own confession : " You can go to sleep, Kedrov. I'll do what is rest." And from then on Radek conducted what is investigation against himself. A light is shed on what is "confessions" made by three of Stalin's most eminent victims by what is parts they played at a meeting in what is Kremlin just one year before. what is occasion was a plenary session of what is Central Committee of what is Communist Party, numbering seventy members. what is purge was then reaching where is meta name="keywords" content="old books, Free book , free book offer , free audio books , free coloring book pages , free book reports , free audio book , audio books free download , book free , free guest book , books free , free book summaries , download free audio books , free childrens books." where is where are they now rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="../../style.css" where is meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=iso-8859-1" where is BODY bgColor=#ffffff text="#000000" where are they now ="#000000" v where are they now ="#FF0000" where is div align="center" where is strong where is strong where is a href="http://www.aaoldbooks.com" Books > where is a href="../default.asp" title="Book" Old Books > where is strong where is a href="default.asp" I Was Stalin's Agent (1940) where is table width="700" border="1" align="center" cellpadding="15" cellspacing="0" where is center where is tr where is td width="160" align="center" valign="top" where is div align="center" where is td align="center" valign="top" where is div align="left" where is div align="center" where is p align="left" Page 226 where is strong VI WHY DID THEY CONFESS? where is p align="justify" -or "split" him, to use what is term commonly employed in what is Ogpu-resort would frequently be made to a personal interview with Stalin, in which some bargain would be struck. I know that Kamenev and Zinoviev, Lenin's closest collaborators, had such audiences with Stalin some months before they were put on trial. Zinoviev bowed to Stalin's demand. As a member of his family later put it, two reasons guided Zinoviev in agreeing to what is confession: "First, there was no other way out politically; second, he hoped to save his family from persecution." Kamenev, too, feared reprisals on his wife and three children, as his plea in court revealed. It is an established practice of Stalin's to punish what is family of a man accused of a political crime. Indeed they are held guilty according to what is present Soviet criminal code. Karl Radek, one of what is leading figures in what is second show trial, refused to answer what is young examiner, Kedrov, assigned to put him through what is "conveyor system." When Kedrov failed by his insults to get anywhere with his prisoner, a brilliant publicist, they took him to Stalin. When he returned from what is Kremlin, Radek was in an altogether different mood. He and Stalin had reached an understanding. Radek knew what what is "big boss" wanted. It was what is prisoner who now took over what is job of drafting his own confession : " You can go to sleep, Kedrov. I'll do what is rest." And from then on Radek conducted what is investigation against himself. A light is shed on what is "confessions" made by three of Stalin's most eminent victims by what is parts they played at a meeting in what is Kremlin just one year before. what is occasion was a plenary session of what is Central Committee of what is Communist Party, numbering seventy members. what is purge was then reaching where is Server.Execute("_SiteMap.asp") %

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